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Curved crown moulding

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Forum topic by rrdesigns posted 469 days ago 1043 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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rrdesigns

491 posts in 1781 days


469 days ago

I am seeking help in how to create curved crown moulding for the top of an armoire. Any ideas? I want to recreate this piece.

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs


6 replies so far

View REO's profile

REO

577 posts in 669 days


#1 posted 469 days ago

we used to use a hussy planer with ground blades for odd mouldings like this. your best bet is most likely a router and several passes of diferent profiles and a pattern to follow. the router wll have to be guided at two points unless you can swing a router bit wide enough to cut in one pass.

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2687 days


#2 posted 469 days ago

1+ on what REO said.

I just saw this on a New Yankee Workshop episode. This is a two part build, and I believe Norm shows the router setup in the second episode. May be worth a look for an idea on setup.

Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usB02xeqwlU

Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cz6dqO7iUO8

-- Nicky

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rrdesigns

491 posts in 1781 days


#3 posted 469 days ago

The links above won’t play. Message says they are private. Any other suggestions on how to find them?

-- Beth, Oklahoma, Rambling Road Designs

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

4827 posts in 1393 days


#4 posted 469 days ago

Hi Beth, I made rounded crowns on my kitchen cabinets at home a few years ago. I used a trick I saw in some magazine FWW I think.
1) Make your straight molding and cut a 1/8” section slice off one end.
2) Cut a block 2x the depth (front to back) of the molding and a couple of inches longer than the molding is high.
3) Make a 1/8” kerf 1/2 way through the block, top to bottom and push the cut off slice(midway along the kerf) in until it bottoms.
4) Chuck the block in a lathe and turn until you just reach the imbedded slice.
5) You can now divide the turning into 4 round corners exactly like the straight molding.

They’re actually a little short of 90 degrees because of saw kerfs but it’s easy to hide. It’s a good idea to mark the molded edge of the slice with a black marker to make it easier to see when turning. I don’t have any construction photos but here’s a finished one.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

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shipwright

4827 posts in 1393 days


#5 posted 469 days ago

Oops! Sorry I should have read more closely. .... :-(

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2687 days


#6 posted 469 days ago

I have a sign in for youtube.

I subscribed to a publisher called digitalPimple who had a lot of New Yankee videos. I watched a few, and the one that I thought could help you with an idea was called “How to build a Queen-Ann highboy.” Norm demonstrated the method that REO mentioned. Norm used multiple router bits to create the profile in a curved molding, similar to your piece.

I just opened another window and I get the same as you. I watched these this past Saturday (really).

-- Nicky

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