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Dust Collection Hose Question

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Forum topic by luvmyfingers10 posted 04-08-2013 06:10 AM 859 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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luvmyfingers10

5 posts in 534 days


04-08-2013 06:10 AM

I recently bought a 3 hp (240 V) dust collection system from Grizzly and also bought 20 feet of heavy duty clear wire reinforced hose. Upon receipt, I noted that the hose really wants to retract so I stretched for several days as I put copper braided wire inside to dissipate static electricity. When I turn on the dust collector, the hose still wants to retract and I am concerned about the braided wire getting ingested by the collector. Any ideas?


17 replies so far

View doyoulikegumwood's profile

doyoulikegumwood

384 posts in 2651 days


#1 posted 04-08-2013 06:28 AM

you will get lots of differing answers to this one I happen to believe running a ground wire inside your collection pipe is allot of whoey. and my guess would be it will eventually end up sucked in to your blower.

-- I buy tools so i can make more money,so ican buy more tools so I can work more, to make more money, so I can buy more tool, so I can work more

View pmayer's profile

pmayer

576 posts in 1724 days


#2 posted 04-08-2013 07:24 AM

Why won’t the wire that is built into the hose serve as a ground?

-- PaulMayer, http://www.vernswoodgoods.com

View ellen35's profile

ellen35

2571 posts in 2091 days


#3 posted 04-08-2013 10:46 AM

I threw mine away and bought a more “friendly” hose. That stuff is impossible!

-- "Don't let the perfect be the enemy of the good." Voltaire

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1796 posts in 1152 days


#4 posted 04-08-2013 11:24 AM

Yep, toss the wire….it’s unneeded.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1254 posts in 607 days


#5 posted 04-08-2013 12:24 PM

Return what you bought and get the strech hose from rockler. I got one and love it. As for the ground it’s unnessary but if you want use the wire in the hose A lose wire is a catch hazard and disaster if the impeller got ahold of it.

View Picklehead's profile

Picklehead

583 posts in 588 days


#6 posted 04-08-2013 01:26 PM

It sounds like you might not be getting enough air FLOW through the hose if it’s trying to retract. Don’t confuse that with not enough suction, as that 3 hp obviously has more than enough. If the hose isn’t connected to a machine, does it try to retract? If you plug the end of the hose while it’s running, it will retract due to the high vacuum pressure and no airflow. My guess is that if you are able to get more air flow through the machine it’s connected to, it might reduce the retraction issue (and also improve dust collection). Someone will be along shortly, no doubt, and either explain this better or point out where I’m mistaken.

That said, all of the above info also sounds spot on!

-- You've got to be smarter than the tree.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3794 posts in 2321 days


#7 posted 04-08-2013 02:03 PM

I wouldn’t suggest putting the ground wire inside the hose … chips & dust could accumulate between the wire and the hose.

The hose’s wire reinforcement can function as a ground, but only if the bare wire is attached to something that is attached to ground. The plastic in the hose is an insulator, and floating grounds don’t do any good.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View gtbuzz's profile

gtbuzz

357 posts in 1100 days


#8 posted 04-08-2013 02:49 PM

Gonna agree with Picklehead. Really sounds like the “problem” is too much suction causing the hose to try to compress. On that note though, I wouldn’t go with the Rockler flex hose to help alleviate that problem. I’ve got both the 4” and 2.5” varieties, and I love using them to clean up around the shop, but because their natural state is in a compressed form, it’s only going to make this problem worse.

View luvmyfingers10's profile

luvmyfingers10

5 posts in 534 days


#9 posted 04-08-2013 04:02 PM

Thanks to all for your input. The wire reinforcement is imbedded into the hose so I cannot see how this can act as a ground as it is insulated from and not exposed to the dust particles traveling through the hose. The literature I have read on this indicates that there is an explosion hazard if there is no mechanism to discharge static electricity which can build inside the hose as the dust travels through. At the same time, I certainly don’t want to suck the braided wire into the collector and damage or destroy it. I am wondering if the length of the hose (I would think greater chance as length gets longer – mine is 20 feet) has much to do with it and if anyone out there has used flex hose of similar lengths for years without going kaboom? I’m not worried about getting killed by an explosion, just what my wife would do to me if I wasn’t mercifully killed by it?

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luvmyfingers10

5 posts in 534 days


#10 posted 04-08-2013 04:05 PM

Also, does anyone know a vendor from whom I can purchase the non expanding/contracting dust collection hose with 4 inch diameter?

View ChuckC's profile

ChuckC

691 posts in 1593 days


#11 posted 04-08-2013 04:30 PM

I was getting really bad shocks from my DC hose, all the time. I opened up the hose on the end to expose the wire that runs through it and grounded it to the DC motor. I haven’t got shocked since. I’m using the Dust Right hose from Rockler.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3794 posts in 2321 days


#12 posted 04-08-2013 04:34 PM

I wouldn’t worry about explosion or fire … this has been beat around a lot on these forums and to the best of my knowledge, there has never been documented case of an explosion or fire caused by static in a small shop dust collection system.

The reason you ground the system is to bleed off ESD (electrostatic discharge). That keeps you from getting zapped by a spark, but more importantly provides some protection for solid-state electronics (e.g. computers, remote controllers, electronic variable speed tools, etc.) that are becoming more commonplace in shops.

To use the wire in the hose, just skin off about an inch of plastic on each end and bend the wire into a loop with a pair of needle-nose pliers. You can then connect the wire to a ground lug, strap, etc.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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luvmyfingers10

5 posts in 534 days


#13 posted 04-08-2013 04:45 PM

Many thanks to “theDane”. I will give that a try and forward your suggestion to my wife so she can contact you and give thanks if I go kaboom :)

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OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 1035 days


#14 posted 04-08-2013 04:59 PM

I believe the Myth Busters had an episode dealing with this issue using pvc pipe for dust collecting. I don’t think they were able to create the scenario that a static shock would make any type of explosion or flash point. Might want to google that in case i’m wrong.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1796 posts in 1152 days


#15 posted 04-08-2013 05:15 PM

It’s one of those urban myths that won’t die. I do agree that if you are having personla discomfort from static shock it may help with that…..but fire/explosion: bah, humbug.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, we sent 'em to Washington.

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