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"YANKEE" Radio Tools store counter display

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Forum topic by jamesicus posted 473 days ago 781 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jamesicus

132 posts in 1289 days


473 days ago

Radio Tools mahogany base store counter display (front view)

Radio Tools mahogany base store counter display (rear view)

(Replica base)

Why did North Bros. even produce Radio Tools? In the days of Radio’s infancy – the 1920s and early 1930s – radio manufacture and rebuild was very much the province of wood workers (including cabinet and furniture makers). The chassis for mounting components and the speaker cabinets were mostly made of wood. I think the No. 105 tool set was by far the one most purchased and used by hobbyists and those doing their own household repairs, while the Yankee No. 106 would have been mostly used by professional component installers and repairmen.

No. 106 boxed Tool Set

The catalog description for the No. 105 Tool Set asserts it is “The handiest set of tools ever made for the man who likes to work on radio, home electic appliances and odd jobs around the house and garage.”

http://jp29.org/wwyankeeradio.htm – my “YANKEE” Radio Tools updated web page[/url]

James


9 replies so far

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jimmyb

172 posts in 489 days


#1 posted 473 days ago

The Yankee screwdriver brings back memories. I was an apprentice IBEW electrician in the 60’s. We learned about the Yankee and found we could “trim out” the switches and receptacles much faster than with a regular screwdriver. The mounting screws were long and took a little while.

Well once the Union found out what we were doing they forbade us from using them on the job :(.

-- Jim, Tinley Park, IL http://jbuda.net

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clieb91

3251 posts in 2532 days


#2 posted 473 days ago

Those are two really nice looking sets of tools. I have a small collection of Yankee Screwdrivers and found them to come in handy every so often.

CtL

-- Chris L. "Don't Dream it, Be it."- PortablePastimes.com (Purveyors of Portable Fun and Fidgets)

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Brit

5107 posts in 1439 days


#3 posted 473 days ago

James – Thanks for posting those two sets. They’re beautiful and useful tools, built to last and you can’t ask for more than that.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

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jamesicus

132 posts in 1289 days


#4 posted 473 days ago

jimmyb wrote:

“The Yankee screwdriver brings back memories. I was an apprentice IBEW electrician in the 60’s. We learned about the Yankee and found we could “trim out” the switches and receptacles much faster than with a regular screwdriver. The mounting screws were long and took a little while.

Well once the Union found out what we were doing they forbade us from using them on the job :(.”

Thank you for that neat anecdote Jimmy.

James

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jamesicus

132 posts in 1289 days


#5 posted 473 days ago

clieb91 wrote:

“Those are two really nice looking sets of tools. I have a small collection of Yankee Screwdrivers and found them to come in handy every so often.”

Thank you, Chris.

James

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jamesicus

132 posts in 1289 days


#6 posted 473 days ago

Brit wrote:

“James – Thanks for posting those two sets. They’re beautiful and useful tools, built to last and you can’t ask for more than that.”

Thanks Andy – I have been using “YANKEE” tools for seventy plus years – none have ever let me down.

James

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Dusty56

11638 posts in 2285 days


#7 posted 473 days ago

Nice to see what used to be “top of the line” tools from the past. : ) How did you end up with them ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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jamesicus

132 posts in 1289 days


#8 posted 472 days ago

Dusty56 wrote:

“Nice to see what used to be “top of the line” tools from the past. : ) How did you end up with them ?”

No. 106 boxed Tool Sets are hard to come by and are pricey. I have found that the best way to assemble one is to search such venues as e-bay, Craig’s List, Etsy, swap meets/flea markets and less common auction houses for “broken” sets – evidently some people would strip the boxed sets of the No. 1431 hand drills and the No. 230 ratchet tool holders following radio tool usage decline after WWII – the individual tool inserts often remain in place in the boxes which are often in very good condition. They are sometimes offered in the $30-$50 range as collectible wooden boxes or “curios” especially in less known venues and at swap meets/flea markets.

To restore “broken” sets to original configuration requires additional expenditures – No. 1431 hand drills are frequently available on e-bay in good condition for $20-$30 – the “toughie” (hard to come by) is the No. 230 ratchet tool holder which requires a lot of searching and patience – ones in good condition go for $40-$70.

So assembling a No. 106 Radio Tool set involves a lot of work and outlay of money. But the rewards can be significant – complete sets are very rare collector items and can bring several hundred dollars at auction.

James

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Dusty56

11638 posts in 2285 days


#9 posted 472 days ago

Thank you for all that info : ) I’ll have to keep an eye out for some of those pieces now.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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