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Woodslicer blade life

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Forum topic by bbasiaga posted 04-05-2013 12:00 AM 1061 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bbasiaga

112 posts in 747 days


04-05-2013 12:00 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw

Hello,

I’ve read a few times around here that the woodslicer resaw blades ‘dull very quickly’. What I’m looking for here is some idea of what ‘quickly’ means. I’m not sure how to quantify that, maybe by board feet or something. A short life for someone resawing all day could be considered a long life for someone that takes years to go through the same amount of lumber.

I am in the market for a new blade and am curious if this will suit my needs, or if there is something I could buy that is maybe more expensive, but would require replacement less frequently.

Thanks,
Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.


15 replies so far

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gfadvm

11542 posts in 1442 days


#1 posted 04-05-2013 01:56 AM

I have been very pleased with Timberwolf’s bi-metal resaw blades. TW says they will outlast ten regular blades and mine haven’t weakened yet. They are more expensive but worth it if they last as long as they say. I have the 1”. 1 TPI and the 3/4”, 2-3 TPI blades. The 1 TPI cuts almost as fast as my TS!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Loren

7826 posts in 2400 days


#2 posted 04-05-2013 02:14 AM

You can buy a coil of blade stock and solder them up yourself.

The soldering is easy.

Here’s a promising deal: http://www.ebay.com/itm/5-8-Shear-Force-Bandsaw-Blade-Coil-100-Resaw-Non-Ferrous-Metal-Wood-Band-Saw-/390446620115?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5ae86e9dd3

Carbide tipped blades are good but really worth it only if you can
run a wider blade than most 14” saws will take.

Because carbide tipped blades have no set to the teeth,
they seem to not have the tendency to lead (twist) in
the cut with more bias one way or the other. Standard
blades will almost inevitably dull a little faster on one side
than the other and this causes leading. Tipped blades
just cut slower as they dull… change in the lead angle
is not as much of an issue.

I run a 3” wide blade on my Hitachi resaw, but knowing
what I know now, if running a standard 18” or 20” band
saw I would buy the widest blade stock the saw would
take and solder them up. Laguna has a lot of people
complaining about them, but they certainly know about
how to spec a resaw blade.

... and the problem with variable pitch blades (woodslicer)
is they are expensive and they dull as fast as any other
untipped blade. When they are new and very sharp
they work great, but as they dull they start to lead
and bow in the cut. Steel blades can be resharpened
by your saw shop, but Woodslicer’s cannot be because
they have variable pitch… thus the option is pretty
much to throw the blade away.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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AandCstyle

1485 posts in 1009 days


#3 posted 04-05-2013 02:20 AM

I have used both the Woodslicer and the TW. They are both good blades and I don’t think you can go wrong with either one. If you want the longest lasting blades, buy those with carbide teeth, but they are VERY pricy and waste more wood. I have been impressed with the customer service from Suffolk Machinery, the makers of the TW blades, but I have never dealt with CS at Highland. Take your pick. FWIW

-- Art

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 790 days


#4 posted 04-05-2013 02:27 AM

It’s impossible to tell you how long the Woodslicer will last you – it depends on what you’re cutting and how much – 3” tall pine or 12” mesquite? I used them for years to resaw the occasional piece of mesquite and they did dull – but they start off so good that “dull” just means they’re only as good as a regular blade, not trash. If you want to just buy one blade and pass it on to your grandkids then a Lenox carbide tipped resaw blade will last a lifetime. I got a 1” wide one in the pile of blades that came with my Rikon and it is still going strong 5 years down the road cutting nothing but hardwoods.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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gfadvm

11542 posts in 1442 days


#5 posted 04-05-2013 02:47 AM

JustJoe- You’re really tempting me with that Lenox carbide. But it’s $200 for my saw. Lifetime? My bi-metals from TW are $70 so maybe that Lenox ain’t so pricy after all! See, now I’ve almost talked myself into one!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Fred Hargis

2045 posts in 1245 days


#6 posted 04-05-2013 11:21 AM

I’ve used the Woodslicer (BTW, the same blade from Iturra is called the Blade Runner, and somewhat cheaper) and really like. I’ve read the comments about “dull quickly” and I don’t make the same judgement. One fellow complained his only lasted 6 months…but he was practically using it 4-5 hours a day. That said, I did recently buy a Lenoxx bi-metal and expect it to last a lot longer…though the cut isn’t nearly as smooth as the Woodslicer.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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JustJoe

1554 posts in 790 days


#7 posted 04-05-2013 05:24 PM

For the carbide-tipped blades – I have to admit that if it hadn’t come with the bandsaw I would never have bought it. I’m just too cheap. But it came with a bunch of other blades and I wanted to try it for resawing one day so I did and I was hooked. Now since I use the bandsaw for pretty much nothing but resaw, it stays on there most of the time. I’ve been keeping my eye open for a really good but extra cheap 14” just to have something I can put a thin blade on for cutting out turning blanks without having to change out the resaw blade on the Rikon. If you don’t do a lot of resawing it’s obviously not worth the money. And the kerf is a bit wider than a normal blade.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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bbasiaga

112 posts in 747 days


#8 posted 04-05-2013 08:24 PM

Thanks guys. I think I’ll probably start out with the Woodslicer, and see how it goes. The Timberwolf was the other I was thinking about, but I think I’ll hold off on that until I see if I’m happy with the life of the woodslicer. I’ll be doing pretty light duty, mainly oak, probably some cherry and potentially hard maple. And its a nights/weekends thing for me, so hopefully it will last a long time under my conditions.

-Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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Surfside

3372 posts in 925 days


#9 posted 04-05-2013 09:21 PM

carbide tipped blade from lenox and haltbar carbon blades for resawing.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View Jim Finn's profile

Jim Finn

1745 posts in 1674 days


#10 posted 04-06-2013 12:16 AM

before buying my carbide blade I was buying woodslicers five at a time. I resaw a lot of 8” cedar.

-- In God We Trust

View Loren's profile

Loren

7826 posts in 2400 days


#11 posted 04-06-2013 01:22 AM

Jim can probably say with authority how long they last then.

I was unimpressed. Maybe I got a lemon – I never bought
another one. I got a stellite tipped blade from Laguna.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View DaleM's profile

DaleM

924 posts in 2136 days


#12 posted 04-06-2013 03:00 AM

My first one was doing great for a few months with light use until I cut through a #6 screw and a small nail within a week. It started to pull towards one side then. I got another and it has lasted me over two years of light to medium use although I sometimes have a 1/4” blade on there, so lets say maybe a year and a half on the Woodslicer. I use it for things it’s not even intended for such as cutting green logs for turning blanks. I also use it on plywood which can be hard on blades and it’s still working well. I’m about to resaw a lot of wood, so I bought some more Woodslicers, except I didn’t. Haha. On someones recommendation on here, I bought what is supposed to be the same blade, but from a different seller. I bought two at only about $19 apiece instead of over $30, but I haven’t tried them yet so I can’t review them yet. I bought them from Woodcraftbands in North Carolina and they do look the same; variable 3 to 4 TPI, 1/2 blades. After I try them I can let you know if they do cut the same.

-- Dale Manning, Carthage, NY

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Jim Finn

1745 posts in 1674 days


#13 posted 04-07-2013 12:23 AM

I think, on average, one of my woodslicer blades lasted about 150 board feet of resawing, mostly cedar. They were still plenty good to rip with but would no longer resaw straight using the fence.

-- In God We Trust

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bannerpond1

279 posts in 650 days


#14 posted 04-08-2013 08:21 PM

I used to use Timber Wolf blades and won’t buy any more now that I’ve tried a Wood Slicer. The difference was dramatic in smoothness and feed rate.

-- --Dale Page

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MrRon

2988 posts in 1995 days


#15 posted 04-08-2013 09:12 PM

I have a Starrett resaw bladethat goes by the name of “Woodpecker”. It cuts fine, but I don’t use it enough to know how long it will last. I bought it because of the Starrett name.

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