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Questions and help with Ebonizing Wood

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Forum topic by Blackie_ posted 04-02-2013 06:42 PM 643 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Blackie_

3507 posts in 1199 days


04-02-2013 06:42 PM

I’ve googled and researched on how to ebonize wood and found that it’s brushed on but what I’m wanting to do is ebonize splines or feathers, will the brush on method work for this? What method works best for this?

Thanks
Randy

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs


12 replies so far

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1519 days


#1 posted 04-02-2013 06:45 PM

Do you mean splines as in G&G furniture? I’d recommend you fuming them with ammonia (with practice on a piece of scrap first to check the color) prior to assembly. Brushing over a finished piece isn’t the way I would go, too much hassle to avoid getting the patina on the other parts… Have you heard about that method?

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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Blackie_

3507 posts in 1199 days


#2 posted 04-02-2013 07:03 PM

Thomas for box splines and I think there’s a method of once you have all the splines cut then soaking them in some sort of solution like denatured alcohol and steel wool, just wasn’t sure about the method in doing this.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1109 posts in 1001 days


#3 posted 04-02-2013 07:08 PM

Hi Randy,
I think you are referancing the wood splines that we use on our mitered corners in box making.
I have used India Ink to dye woods then place the spline, but, there will be ink touch up after sanding.
The soaking method using steel wool and vinigar works a bit better, but sometimes the wood will shrimk after placement (if not dry enough) and again touch up will be needed.
The ammonia meathod does not penitrate deeply into the wood to go all the way through a 1/8” spline … however all three meathods do make a cool shadow effect on the splines … if that is what you are looking for.
I have tried everything from easter egg dye to analin (sp) dye to try to permiate the wood … no luck so far.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1519 days


#4 posted 04-02-2013 07:30 PM

Ah yes wood splines for boxes, geddit. It can work if you cut them flush before glueing them (first cut flush, then fume with ammonia, then glue in place). The problem with the vinegar method is the water in it, as Mike said, the wood will pump it in.

(BTW Mike it’s anilin… :)

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1519 days


#5 posted 04-02-2013 07:32 PM

Uh, you know when you’ve got those “slap in the forehead” moments? I just posted a pen project, I realize that you could well try the printer ink method I use for pens to stain your splines! I put a few drops of the printer ink in a small container with pure alcoohol and brush it over the pens. The alcohool evaporates real quick and the wood doesn’t get much moisture from the process, if need be a quick 10 minute run in the oven at 110°C and call it the day.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1519 days


#6 posted 04-02-2013 07:38 PM

  • revelation of the day number two*: chinese ink turns anything jet black and adds a shine that would certainly match that of ebony. Question is, what kind of a finish do you put atop that thing… did anyone try that?

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11226 posts in 1376 days


#7 posted 04-03-2013 02:21 AM

Randy, It seems to me this is a “no win” situation: if you ebonize them before glueing them in,you’ll sand off some color later; and if you ebonize them after they are glued and sanded, you’ll invariably get some dye bleeding into the adjacent wood. I’ll be following this one to see how it comes out. Personally I’d use some really dark walnut as it looks pretty black on the end grain when finished.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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Blackie_

3507 posts in 1199 days


#8 posted 04-03-2013 02:57 AM

Hey Andy, well I did just yesterday add some wenge to my inventory it’s darker then Walnut but was just looking at other options that is if possible other then purchasing Ebony.

I was hoping to get the 1/8 splines soaked through so as not to sand the color out and I think red oak is the best candidate for this, what I’ll do is experiment then post the outcome with details failure or not.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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Boxguy

1487 posts in 954 days


#9 posted 04-03-2013 04:30 AM

Randy,

Use ebony. It is expensive, but sliced into 1/8 strips a little goes a long way. Andy is right…Black Walnut looks really close.

-- Big Al in IN

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Blackie_

3507 posts in 1199 days


#10 posted 04-03-2013 11:22 AM

Big Al and Andy is Black Walnut the same as Dark Walnut?

Take a look at this Wenge

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

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Sodabowski

2039 posts in 1519 days


#11 posted 04-03-2013 12:20 PM

Al, I don’t know where you get your ebony from, but I’ve seen a few suppliers on the web that provide sliced ebony for inlay strip making that are on the cheap side. One of them happens to have 1/4” thick slabs and some 0,40” for what I find to be very decent prices.

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

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gfadvm

11226 posts in 1376 days


#12 posted 04-03-2013 06:32 PM

Randy, That wenge is beautiful stuff. Your splines are essentially exposed end grain and American Black walnut is pretty dark. Look at some of my boxes with walnut splines and see if they are black enough for your needs. Or buy some ebony!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

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