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Cutting board glue up issue

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Forum topic by Rich L. posted 04-02-2013 08:43 AM 900 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rich L.

14 posts in 1032 days


04-02-2013 08:43 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

Hi all,

Just finished an end grain cutting board and while attaching the feet I noticed some thin hairlines between some pieces. I figure it must be glue? This is my 6th board and the first time I’ve noticed this. I’ve added a photo. Think I should scrap it and start over or does it look like it would survive?

Thanks for your opinions.

Rich L

-- Rich, Southern CA


8 replies so far

View held105mp's profile

held105mp

3 posts in 638 days


#1 posted 04-02-2013 10:28 AM

Glue. I wouldve never noticed ut if u hadnt mentioned it. Ive completed dozens of these. Dont scrap it for goodness sakes. You have the same problem as most other woodworkers… you are too critical of your own work.
Be well…

View scotsman9's profile

scotsman9

134 posts in 643 days


#2 posted 04-02-2013 10:38 AM

I think you should mail me that beautiful work of art. After several years of use in my kitchen I will get back to you on a better method for you to use. LOL

No really, mail it to me, I love it.

-- Just a man and his opinion.

View bannerpond1's profile

bannerpond1

281 posts in 653 days


#3 posted 04-02-2013 11:28 AM

It’s a glue line. I called Tite Bond about it and they told me to switch from III to II since the color is different. If you use cherry, maple, and walnut together for design, as I do, you can’t get away from seeing the glue line somewhere. I’d just forget about it.

That said, be sure you sand the end grain enough to get it down to the thinnest glue line possible. If your blocks have the slightest roundover, that will translate to a wider glue line.

I glue sacrificial blocks to the ends of my end grain glue-ups and run the end grain faces through my 15” planer. The sacrificial ends act as backer boards for the end grain and I get ZERO tear out. There are professionals with web sites who say you can’t put end grain through a planer. It just isn’t so. I take off only about 1/64 at a time and then run the boards through my drum sander over and over with 150 grit. It sure lessens the time with a ROS and I retain the dead flat surface on the boards. Here’s a tip with drum sanders: Run the board through three times on the same setting. It will be better on the third time than the first. The end grain tends to be difficult to get the scratches out. Running it over and over with the same settting is much quicker than half an hour of ROS work.

-- --Dale Page

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Rich L.

14 posts in 1032 days


#4 posted 04-03-2013 06:33 AM

Thanks for the reply. I was worried that the visible glue line might make for a weak joint. I’m feeling better about it now.

Dale, gonna try using the sacrificial blocks with the planer next time. I get severe snipe with my planer. Never thought to try that.

-- Rich, Southern CA

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15337 posts in 1943 days


#5 posted 04-06-2013 04:57 PM

Some good advice was given above,,, I have used my planer on alot of boards as well. Problems come with taking too much off in one pass… Keep up the good work.

One thing to watch is grain orientation….. If you look at the to two (what I assume is cherry) in the middle right, the pieces got flip as the grain is in a different direction than the others on the left. I was taught this by a fellow Lumberjocks. Just a helpful tip no offense.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Rich L.'s profile

Rich L.

14 posts in 1032 days


#6 posted 04-06-2013 07:20 PM

Good spot on the grain direction Ken. I noticed my mistake as soon as I started clamping. It was basicaly a case of “glue up panic”. I was moving way too slow, started to rush and fumpled some of the pieces. By the time I noticed it was too late. Thanks for the input.

-- Rich, Southern CA

View bannerpond1's profile

bannerpond1

281 posts in 653 days


#7 posted 04-08-2013 08:34 PM

Rich, if you’re getting snipe, you can glue some “skis” to the edges of the board, long enough that the “real” board will be out of the planer before the snipe kicks in.

When I took a one-day course at Marc Adams, I saw a planer modification which I immediately built at home. I now have a four-foot melamine-covered MDF board which lays on top of the infeed rollers, through the planer, and out over the outfeed rollers. Cleats on each end prevent the board from traveling in or out of the planer. My snipe problems are virtually gone.

I’ve made that mistake in grain direction over and over. I try hard to make the grain part of the design, just like the color is part of it. You can flip the pieces end for end, roll them 180 degrees, or both. You can make cathedral arches by bookmatching two pieces over and over.

-- --Dale Page

View Rich L.'s profile

Rich L.

14 posts in 1032 days


#8 posted 04-09-2013 06:52 PM

I’m going to try both of your suggestions Dale. Thanks

-- Rich, Southern CA

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