LumberJocks

Beadboard Cabinet Door Panels

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by BentheViking posted 477 days ago 1297 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1160 days


477 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question beadboard cabinet door panel tablesaw joining milling

So we bought our house last summer and now I finally am getting to tackle our nasty kitchen cabinet doors. The stiles and rails are ok with just a nice cove molding on the inside and outside. The panels on the other hand are a completely different story. Fortunately the paneling pops out. It was originally inset with little swinging clasp (think of the back of a picture frame). So we got the idea to take the giant stack of beadboard (1/2” MDF) that someone gave us and use that as new panels.

So this morning I started prototyping the panels (now taking a hot dog and red sox opening day break), but haven’t been in love with the results so far.

I like it how its shown, but I’m struggling to square up the beadboard to begin with and then to properly inset the panel at the base of the cove so that its a tight fit around the whole door. The doors are most likely not all square so I figure I am going to have to trace things (I think there will end up being a lot of screwed up panels.)

So my other thought was to try and cheat so that the panel sits behind the cove molding.

This will be a certainly easier way to go about the project (1/2 the number of rabbets), but I don’t think I will like how much the board will stick out on the backside of the door asthetically and since I think the raw MDF will be difficult to finish.

Could I run the back side of the panels through my planer?

Surely someone here has had a similar issue and I know plent of people have made beadboard cabinet doors, so help me out (hopefully before SWMBO comes home from work)! Thanks

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson


16 replies so far

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10365 posts in 1602 days


#1 posted 477 days ago

I think from an aesthetic point of view the first picture makes a lot of sense put it will be a lot of work like you said. The second itteration is obviously less work. Could you find a 1/4 strip to fill in the behind the stile so that you have, essentially, a flat panel when looking at the back side of the door?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1160 days


#2 posted 477 days ago

I’ve got no issue with additional work that #1 would take. I thought about adding something but worry how that would mess things up with the hinges and drawers and things. It seems like that would take a lot of additional work even if it didn’t cause an issue.

My biggest concern with option #1 is the precision at which to cut the panels. I’m wondering if I am going at it wrong and trying to work in a way that I can’t see. What if I try a router and straight edges?

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10365 posts in 1602 days


#3 posted 477 days ago

So you are concerned that the original openings of the cabinet doors arent square. I gotcha now. I think youd have to lay the doors over the beadboard panels and scribe each one so they match without any gaps.

FWIW – weve also been pondering replacing our cabinet doors and im pretty sure weve found them with hinges installed for like $40 a piece. Possibly less. Id have to check with the wife.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View DrDirt's profile

DrDirt

2353 posts in 2338 days


#4 posted 477 days ago

The second photo will look better in practice, as it is always a challenge to have the panel flush with the cove all the way around, and any deviation will draw both dirt and you eye to it.

Another thing to keep an eye on, is with the beadboard, to make sure your vertical lines are lined up for upper versus lower cabinets so that you don’t have a bead running 1/2 inch from the stile on the bottom and 1 inch on the top.
Just have to plan for it.

-- "If we did all the things we are capable of doing, we would literally astonish ourselves." Edison

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1160 days


#5 posted 477 days ago

Thats what I tried doing but I didn’t get it great. Maybe it will take more practice and honing my technique, but I’m trying to see if there is another way to do it. So far my only guess has been a router and straight edge

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10365 posts in 1602 days


#6 posted 477 days ago

Im with Dirt …. its gonna be tough. Lots of visual stimulation goin on with beadboard. If you have uppers and lowers above one another id take them both and lay them over the beadboard together so your bead grooves line up.

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1160 days


#7 posted 477 days ago

I wasn’t necessarily going to have them line up but they would have been pretty close.

I don’t have any real areas in the kitchen where you have uppers above lowers. My bigger issue would be a cabinet with multiple drawers or a drawer and door.

If I go with #2 should I edge band it so at least I have wood and not mdf on the edge?

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1160 days


#8 posted 473 days ago

So I’ve been thinking about this more this week and I think I am going to run with option #2.

Still hate the idea of the exposed MDF edges. I saw some iron on edge banding material at lowes. How will that hold onto the MDF long term?

Would I be better off using cutting thin strips of something like pine and glue and tack it on?

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1446 days


#9 posted 472 days ago

It seems like the beadboard is driving the anxiety about how this will work and look.

Let’s do a what if: What if you didn’t have the beadboard? What would you put in the frames? How much would it cost? Could you sell the BB on CL and get close to what you really want?

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1160 days


#10 posted 472 days ago

Lee I thank you for your response, but beadboard is what i really want just a matter of figuring out exactly how i want to do it so that I am happy with the results. I figured rather than screwing around with things that may not work, I’d ask the experts here who may have some experience.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10365 posts in 1602 days


#11 posted 472 days ago

Where are the exposed mdf edges? On the cove molding or on the inside of the cabinet?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2163 posts in 1446 days


#12 posted 472 days ago

Thanks for straightening me out, Ben. I misread!

Ok, so you’re doing option #2. How about a chamfer on the perimeter on the backside? It would soften the bulk of the protrusion and it is only a quarter inch.

In any event: edgebanding that teeny edge would be a bonkers-inducing practice. It’d just going to take a couple coats of primer, some sanding and then careful finish work. I think it will be fine!

And I do enjoy beadboard—there’s nothing close to the vintage air it exhales.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1160 days


#13 posted 472 days ago

The exposed mdf would be on backside of the panel so the inside of the door.

I like the idea of chamfering the edges. Probably be a little better in terms of not chipping long term, but will leave a larger amount of MDF exposed.

I am hoping to get 10 years out of this renovation so i just want to make sure things are done right and built to last.

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View BentheViking's profile

BentheViking

1746 posts in 1160 days


#14 posted 471 days ago

Decided that the edges weren’t as big of a deal as I thought. Only got a couple done today. Hopefully knock out a bunch more tomorrow

-- It's made of wood. Real sturdy.--Chubbs Peterson

View chrisstef's profile

chrisstef

10365 posts in 1602 days


#15 posted 471 days ago

Yea buddy! Those are gonna look sharp. Quintessential new england. They getting a fresh coat of paint?

-- "there aren’t many hand tools as awe-inspiring as the #8 jointer. I mean, it just reeks of cast iron heft and hubris" - Smitty

showing 1 through 15 of 16 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase