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Paste Wax Swirl Marks in my Shiny New CI Saw Top

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Forum topic by gtbuzz posted 03-31-2013 10:56 PM 1335 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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gtbuzz

385 posts in 1185 days


03-31-2013 10:56 PM

Trying to protect the cast iron top on my new saw and I did the following process:

- mineral spirits to remove all the cosmoline; very shiny mirror like finish
- applied a coat of Boeshield T9 and rubbed it in, let it dry overnight. used a clean ran to clean off the excess and remove some of the tackiness. Not as shiny as before, but still a nice looking finish
- applied a coat of Johnson’s paste wax, let it sit for a few minutes, then try to buff it out

Problem is now, that there are swirl marks everywhere and no matter how hard I try buffing, it doesn’t seem to do anything. Any tips on how to get it back to a nice looking surface again? Wood seems to slide across it nicely, so it’s doing what it’s supposed to, but it’s just a little irritating that a brand new table saw top doesn’t look so hot already. Do I need to use some mineral spirits to take everything off and start over again?


9 replies so far

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Charlie

1064 posts in 1030 days


#1 posted 03-31-2013 11:02 PM

Try rubbing some more wax into it. I did 3 coats on mine to get it to look even. :)

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gtbuzz

385 posts in 1185 days


#2 posted 03-31-2013 11:05 PM

Will the swirl marks from previous layers not show through? Also, should I be waiting a few minutes before buffing it out? I noticed it goes on pretty easily but after letting it sit, it’s awfully tacky.

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Charlie

1064 posts in 1030 days


#3 posted 03-31-2013 11:11 PM

It should dry to a haze. Then you need clean rags to buff it out. And keep flippin’ ‘em.

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hotbyte

192 posts in 1719 days


#4 posted 03-31-2013 11:20 PM

This mean you got all the parts in and saw setup? Bet you’re having fun with that :)

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SteveKnnn

66 posts in 632 days


#5 posted 03-31-2013 11:51 PM

The additional wax, don’t overdue it, will dissolve the previous wax. Maybe you waited TOO long before buffing?

-- Steve in Richmond, VA

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kdc68

2068 posts in 1021 days


#6 posted 04-01-2013 02:31 AM

I know what you mean…. Apply a light second coat and wrap a rag around a 1/4 sheet palm sander…unless you have a car buffer….make multiple passes until the swirls are gone….worked for me

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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MT_Stringer

2100 posts in 1975 days


#7 posted 04-01-2013 03:22 AM

Run a couple of hundred board feet of lumber over the top. That ought to work! :-)

-- Handcrafted by Mike Henderson - Channelview, Texas

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gtbuzz

385 posts in 1185 days


#8 posted 04-02-2013 03:54 AM

Thanks for all the suggestions. A couple extra coats of wax really helped even things out. Did things a little differently the subsequent times though. I didn’t wait nearly as long to buff off the wax and instead of using a rag I used a disposable shop towel. That allowed me to switch out a lot more often and it really seemed to make a difference. There’s still an area or two that are a little swirly, but it’s hardly noticable. As MT_Stringer says, a few hundred bf of lumber should even that right out.

I did this same process to my lathe bed (which unfortuantely has some scars from where finishes splattered on it), and wow, what a difference. Tool rest and tailstock glide on there like I never thought possible. Really wish I had done this long ago.

As far as maintenance goes, do I just wax every month or so (I live in Georgia so it’s pretty humit) and do the whole T9 treatment maybe twice a year? Also, before reapplying the T9, should I take some mineral spirits to the top or can I just go straight over what’s there (assuming there’s no rust)?

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kdc68

2068 posts in 1021 days


#9 posted 04-02-2013 11:21 AM

IMO applying T9 and paste wax on your table saw top might be redundant. Both will provide rust protection. I’m no expert because I have only owned two table saws in 20+ years. But on my old Craftsman I would apply wax on the top about 4 times a year or whenever I notice a dramatic lose in slickness. I would re-wax over the top without using mineral spirits, unless there was something that needed removed prior. I would apply T9 or a similar product on the mechanisms underneath (cleaning with mineral spirits if there is pitch build up) at the times I do the top. When I sold the Craftsman, the gentleman complimented on the care I had given it and asked me how I keep it rust free for all those years. So I guess I was doing something right and have been doing the same maintenance schedule with the new saw I bought the first of the year. And I follow a similar maintenance schedule with all the other tools I own…works for me. I do everything at once, it doesn’t take too long because I do it often enough that there isn’t issues. My workshop is in the basement of the house and is relatively climate controlled. Your situation may differ of course, but stick to a program that suits you needs. With proper care your tools will last many years

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

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