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Refurbishing Question on a Panel Gauge

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Forum topic by Dave posted 03-30-2013 04:02 AM 938 views 0 times favorited 44 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dave

11168 posts in 1491 days


03-30-2013 04:02 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I have come across a nice gauge. The plates are made of steel and the screws are brass.
My question is what do you guys use to break the corrosion between the steel and brass while they are attached to the wood body of the tool? Hopefully not damaging the wood.
I would like to try my best to save the screws and not have to tap them out.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com


44 replies so far

View Joe Lyddon's profile

Joe Lyddon

7710 posts in 2703 days


#1 posted 03-30-2013 04:38 AM

Some kind of penetrating oil?

Electrolysis… watched very carefully as to not overdo it…
... when it looks like it has done something, pull it, clean it off, oil it down, & try to get them out…
... if no luck, wash down with soap & water & try it some more… etc. (??)
... That’s what I would try… no guarantees…

What is it & how is it used?

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1491 days


#2 posted 03-30-2013 05:07 AM

Thanks Joe.
Its a panel gauge.
It works just like a marking gauge.
Just a lot bigger.
It is real handy when you need to mark a panel then rip it by hand. It will give you a great straight line.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

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Joe Lyddon

7710 posts in 2703 days


#3 posted 03-30-2013 05:24 AM

OK, so there is small CUTTER in there somewhere… Makes sense…

-- Have Fun! Joe Lyddon - Alta Loma, CA USA - Home: http://www.WoodworkStuff.net ... My Small Gallery: http://www.ncwoodworker.net/pp/showgallery.php?ppuser=1389&cat=500"

View boxcarmarty's profile

boxcarmarty

9284 posts in 1011 days


#4 posted 03-30-2013 11:16 AM

Maybe clean and oil the wood first to help protect it against whatever else???

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

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boxcarmarty

9284 posts in 1011 days


#5 posted 03-30-2013 11:20 AM

Could steaming the wood help loosen the screw like heat on steal???

Perhaps not. I think dry wood would be best in this case. Anything would swell the wood and make the screw tighter…..

-- My mind is like lighting, one brilliant flash, then its gone.....

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

13506 posts in 1326 days


#6 posted 03-30-2013 11:21 AM

Dave,
Wouldn’t it be easier to leave it as is…..
& hang it in Marty’s Museum???

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

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paratrooper34

760 posts in 1603 days


#7 posted 03-30-2013 11:41 AM

I would try heating it up with a heat gun. They should come loose with heat.

-- Mike

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stefang

13017 posts in 1985 days


#8 posted 03-30-2013 12:02 PM

Interesting problem Dave. I haven’t a clue what to do except for searching the net. I did find something that suggested placing plastic between the brass and steel parts to prevent corrosion, but nothing on getting stuff apart.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Dave's profile

Dave

11168 posts in 1491 days


#9 posted 03-30-2013 12:39 PM

Thank you gentlemen. It looks like I have got a good one.
Two of you have suggested heat.

I thank you for your time and efforts.
You to Randy.
I will post results when I try.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View Brit's profile

Brit

5146 posts in 1493 days


#10 posted 03-30-2013 12:50 PM

Dave – nice find. I would apply some penetrating oil and let it sit for 24 hours, then take a metal rod about 6” long, rest one end on each screw and give the other end of the rod a couple of taps with a metal hammer. This works wonders at breaking the seal. When you do eventually try to loosen the screws, make sure the screwdriver is a good fit in the slot to reduce the risk of it camming out. You might need to clean the slots out first with your little pointy tool. Everyone has a littly pointy tool don’t they?

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

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Brit

5146 posts in 1493 days


#11 posted 03-30-2013 12:52 PM

By the way Dave, any chance you can post a photo that shows the shape of the handle. It looks interesting.

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9887 posts in 1269 days


#12 posted 03-30-2013 12:56 PM

I need to catch up on this one – Am I correct in thinking it doesn’t function at all, and that’s why you’re wanting to disassemble?

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

1821 posts in 841 days


#13 posted 03-30-2013 01:46 PM

Dave,

First and foremost, I would not try to remove any screws that weren’t necessary, to avoid any possible damage to the gauge not required for restoration. That means the wear plate, and adjustment screw plate. These can be polished up in place.
As for the scribe screw (assuming there is one, not shown in the photos) and the width adjustment screw, I would take great care to remove these without imposing any forces that could impart any damage, by proceeding as follows:
Very carefully use a sharp device like a large carpet needle to scratch all around the base of the screw in an attempt to remove the rust attached to the screw & plate junction, hopefully to create a small void or opening into which penetrating oil can be puddled. Then, as with soldering copper pipe, apply heat to draw the oil into the hidden threads.
This heat needs to be controlled, obviously, so I would use an electric soldering iron applied to the head of the screw. I would use a low wattage iron, maybe something like a cheep 30 watt iron.
This may do the trick, maybe not, but it won’t do any additional damage to the scribe.

Good luck, post the final results

Oldtool

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

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sikrap

1015 posts in 2010 days


#14 posted 03-30-2013 09:19 PM

I would use Kroil. I have found Kroil will free rusted nuts/bolts when products like PB Blaster, 3 in 1 oil and others won’t have any affect.

-- Dave, Colonie, NY

View Don W's profile

Don W

15017 posts in 1218 days


#15 posted 03-30-2013 10:13 PM

and either an impact driver or a screw drive with some solid taps as you turn it.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

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