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Forum topic by Hammerthumb posted 03-29-2013 02:43 PM 977 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hammerthumb

1497 posts in 718 days


03-29-2013 02:43 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer electricity current

Some of you might have read in a prior post that I was given a Powermatic 209HH 20” planer. I downloaded the manual yesterday and reviewed the specifications. It is a 5hp single phase. The manual indicates the electrical service requirements to be 60 amps. Does this seem a little high? My TS is 3hp and runs on a 20amp service. I have not had a chance to look at the markings on the motor yet, but will try to get to that later today. Any electricians out there that could help me with this? I do have a background in electronics, so I have a basic understanding of electricity, but this has me stumped.

-- Paul, Las Vegas


13 replies so far

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1149 posts in 2222 days


#1 posted 03-29-2013 03:01 PM

The amps should be shown on the motor. 60 amps does seem high to me, my 5hp Powermatic saw is 21 amps and I am running 10/2 to a 30 amp breaker.

Grab a users manual from the PM site, it should have this info in there.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 692 days


#2 posted 04-01-2013 12:13 AM

check the name plate that seem crazy high. The 5HP on my old 912 bellsaw was 25 amps, and the 5HP on my 60 Gal comp is 23 amps. heck my neighbor has 2 leasson 10HP sitting on a shelf and they are rated at 40 amps.

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Hammerthumb

1497 posts in 718 days


#3 posted 04-01-2013 12:20 AM

The motor plate says 28 amps. I know that on start up it will draw a lot more but 60 seems crazy high. I’m havering it wire with a 50 amp service with wire that will handle 60. If it trips the breaker to often, I’ll replace the breaker with a 60.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

4429 posts in 1072 days


#4 posted 04-01-2013 12:29 AM

I’d contact PM tech. support…..

You could wire up a sub panel for what that’s going to cost you.

30 amp with 10-2 wire should do a 5 HP motor.

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15058 posts in 2419 days


#5 posted 04-01-2013 02:37 AM

Sq D motor calculation says full load current 28 amps at 230-240 v, # 8 Cu wire and 60 amp breaker.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View jumbojack's profile

jumbojack

1221 posts in 1367 days


#6 posted 04-01-2013 03:08 AM

Dear Mr Hammerthumb;

We request you cease from firing your planer up after dark. It causes the top eight floors of our hotel to go dark.

Thank you in advance
D Trump

-- Made in America, with American made tools....Shopsmith

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Hammerthumb

1497 posts in 718 days


#7 posted 04-01-2013 04:27 AM

Thanks Topomax Survivor. That is what my electrician suggested. Jumbo Jack – I can see Trump Tower here in Las Vegas from my driveway. I’ll make sure to check it out when I fire it up. Don’t want to p-off The Donald. “Your Fired!!!l

-- Paul, Las Vegas

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TopamaxSurvivor

15058 posts in 2419 days


#8 posted 04-01-2013 04:33 AM

U R welcome. The D is the only guy to ever go broke in the casino business. No wonder he wants to fire every one ;-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Shawn Masterson's profile

Shawn Masterson

1262 posts in 692 days


#9 posted 04-01-2013 08:58 AM

#10 and a 30 amp breaker will do fine. My DC is a 3HP rated @ 18 amps, it draws 70-80 on start up. and I have never had any trouble. The name plate is telling you the maximum safe full load amps, if you check the draw while being fed it probably isn’t near that. I am not saying to undersize the wire, but #8 seems excessive to me my planer and compressor are both 5HP and they are on #10, the only thing in my shop that is larger than #10 is the welder/ROC plug, It’s 50 amps with #6 (what I had).

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15058 posts in 2419 days


#10 posted 04-02-2013 01:19 AM

There is a minor issue with the National Electrical Code. Just because it works, doesn’t mean it is safe.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

1228 posts in 768 days


#11 posted 04-02-2013 02:06 AM

You can get a $15 clamp meter from HF that will give you a good idea how many amps the motor is really drawing, both at startup and while under load.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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Hammerthumb

1497 posts in 718 days


#12 posted 04-02-2013 03:02 AM

I agree Topamax Survivor. Got to do it by the book. Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2098 posts in 932 days


#13 posted 04-03-2013 12:45 AM

If you invest in a decent clamp meter, eg a Fluke meter, you can get all kinds of info like this on all your machines. Manufacturers often state misleading requirements.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

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