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Forum topic by widdle posted 03-28-2013 10:32 PM 782 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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widdle

1399 posts in 1636 days


03-28-2013 10:32 PM

Hi…Looking for a jig or some sort of carriage , to create 1 1/2” by 12” +- octagon( rip) on the table saw….Router not an option…thanks


10 replies so far

View rkober's profile

rkober

127 posts in 930 days


#1 posted 03-28-2013 11:03 PM

I just made some hexagon material for a project but the steps are similar. Start with stock wider than 1.5” (say 3”). Cut the 45’s on one side with the blade just high enough to clear the cut (ie knock the corners off). Flip the piece end for end, readjust the fence to make the remaining 45 deg cuts. Lastly cut the hexagon loose with a 90 deg cut. I don’t really think you need a jig unless I’m misunderstanding your question.

-- Ray - Spokane, WA - “Most people don’t recognize opportunity because it’s usually disguised as hard work.” - Unknown

View stnich's profile

stnich

108 posts in 1562 days


#2 posted 03-28-2013 11:14 PM

If I’m understanding what you want you might try to make a jig similar to what you would make a Pencil Post Bed Post with. Take your 1 1/2×1`12” blank and mount it on a jig similar to a lathe. Find the center of the 1 1/2 dimension and attach it with screws on both sides. Then just rotate the blank around in 22 1/2 degree increments. Check out MikeDe’s project http://lumberjocks.com/projects/56002 He has a jig for a tapered Pencil Post Post. Just make one smaller and not for a taper.

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widdle

1399 posts in 1636 days


#3 posted 03-28-2013 11:16 PM

Thanks Ray..My stock is already 1 5/8”, soo not alot of extra material…I mentioned jig or carriage because a bunch of 22 1/2 dgree rips…felt a bit sketchy

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widdle

1399 posts in 1636 days


#4 posted 03-28-2013 11:19 PM

Thanks stnich, But not understanding that set up…thanks

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 676 days


#5 posted 03-28-2013 11:21 PM

If you google: No-hassle octagon cutting
One of the first results will be a google book link to a preview of a FWW article on how to do it with pictures and diagrams.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

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widdle

1399 posts in 1636 days


#6 posted 03-28-2013 11:29 PM

Thanks Joe..and google…Still not alot of support on that technique…mabye..

View DaveinCA's profile

DaveinCA

13 posts in 1652 days


#7 posted 03-29-2013 01:22 AM

You could make a jig similar to this

If I understand your description you want the finished result to be an octagon approx. 12” across. If you use the dimensions in the sketch, start with the fence about 18-1/2” away from the blade, put your squared work piece in the V-notch and clip off all four corners. The rotate the work piece 1/8 turn and repeat the process. I may be over thinking this, but that’s how I would do it if I only had a tablesaw.

-- Dave, Clovis CA

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widdle

1399 posts in 1636 days


#8 posted 03-29-2013 05:42 AM

Thanks Dave,,cali boy..right on…Actually i was doing more of a rip cut..Sort if like a chisel handle with octagonal sides… thanks..

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DaveinCA

13 posts in 1652 days


#9 posted 03-29-2013 07:55 PM

Sorry for the confusion, I must have looked beyond the rip cut description earlier. In that case I wouldn’t use a jig at all. Just square up the stock and then tilt your tablesaw blade to 45 degrees (away from the fence). Set the fence 1-1/16” away from the blade at the table (base of the cut) and proceed to make your first rip. Rotate 1/4 turn and repeat … After ripping off all four corners, rotate 1/8 of a turn and dress the four existing faces if within reach of the blade. If the blade is just beyond the existing faces, then move the fence in a few thou and repeat the process. This should work if your stock is square, and I would suggest using a feather board to keep it tight to the fence.

-- Dave, Clovis CA

View Dan Lyke's profile

Dan Lyke

1473 posts in 2763 days


#10 posted 03-29-2013 08:16 PM

For my dodecagonal plate frame, I cut the ends of my pieces to as close to 15° as I could, glued up two halves, clamped those halves together and ran a saw down the remaining joint to make sure the remaining edges were as parallel as possible. It’s possible that it’s just a little out of round, but some judicious sanding took care of that.

(Luckily, the plate isn’t exactly round either… grin)

Next time I’ll consider adding a half a sawblade width to the pieces that end up on the ends to be joined together, on the other hand that’s also in the range where sanding can take care of it.

-- Dan Lyke, Petaluma California, http://www.flutterby.net/User:DanLyke

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