LumberJocks

Any machinists out there ever made their own hand plane parts?

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Emma Walker posted 03-27-2013 11:03 PM 1254 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Emma Walker's profile

Emma Walker

560 posts in 762 days


03-27-2013 11:03 PM

Is it worth the time and effort to set up the tooling and to buy tapes and dies to make brass adjustment knobs, knob and tote bolts and nuts, frog bolts, so on & so on?

After Becca’s schooling is done we’ll be moving back to Wisconsin where my dad has a metal lathe that almost never gets used.

-- I'm a twisted 2x4 in a pile of straight lumber.


19 replies so far

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 689 days


#1 posted 03-27-2013 11:19 PM

I’ve made rods for the Stanley #46 (they’re threaded) and for the 45. Stanley didn’t use a normal size-TPI so regular cheap taps/dies aren’t available – you’ve got to cut them on the lathe and deal with the whole rolled vs cut threads. I haven’t had the need to make brass knobs, tote bolts etc because I’ve still got a couple dozen of each size ready to go. If your dad’s lathe is available cheap, it’s always a good thing to have. Equip it with a milling attachment and you can make rods for the combo planes, lever caps, parts for other tools like miter boxes etc. It takes a little jig work but you can also set it up to cut wooden threads in any size you want.

-- This Ad Space For Sale! Your Ad Here! Reach a targeted audience! Affordable Rates, easy financing! Contact an ad represenative today at JustJoe's Advertising Consortium.

View Emma Walker's profile

Emma Walker

560 posts in 762 days


#2 posted 03-27-2013 11:32 PM

JustJoe,

So what you’re saying is that Stanley threads are not a standard tap and die set size? THOSE BASTARDS!

I know nothing about combo planes… I graduated block planes with a C- and I’m now working on #4 and #5 smoother planes.

I love getting ahead of myself… I have tons of time on my hands for the couple of months.

-- I'm a twisted 2x4 in a pile of straight lumber.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1649 days


#3 posted 03-27-2013 11:44 PM

Depends on how much time and effort you want to put in. These are some adjusters I made the other night.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Emma Walker's profile

Emma Walker

560 posts in 762 days


#4 posted 03-28-2013 12:43 AM

David how do you do the (knerel) without it repeating over it’s self until it’s like 800 grit sand paper?

-- I'm a twisted 2x4 in a pile of straight lumber.

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1649 days


#5 posted 03-28-2013 12:53 AM

There are some really complicated calculations to set the repeating of the knurling. It goes by the diameter of the piece, the pitch of the teeth on the knurl, the depth of the pattern, and the speed of the carriage advance.

I don’t pay attention to any of them. I just do it and how it comes out is what I take. It has worked fine so far.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View Don W's profile

Don W

15018 posts in 1219 days


#6 posted 03-28-2013 12:55 AM

who wants a mass produced looking knurl anyhow!!

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

472 posts in 1412 days


#7 posted 03-28-2013 01:00 AM

For knurling buy a knurling tool like this one at Grizzly http://www.grizzly.com/products/Floating-Knurling-Tool/H7571.
I believe you will find one arranged like this one to be preferable to other designs.

Planeman

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1649 days


#8 posted 03-28-2013 01:03 AM

Yes, it is almost a guarantee that you need that type when you do little stuff. I use a similar one:

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View David Kirtley's profile

David Kirtley

1281 posts in 1649 days


#9 posted 03-28-2013 01:21 AM

Also, as far as I know, it is not that Stanley chose a size that was non-standard. They were making them before the standards were adopted and didn’t choose to retool to match the standard. Not that big of a deal as you can still get them from Stanley last I heard. You could get some custom ones made but it would end up costing more than just replacing the plane or buying a donor for parts.

Personally, for a user, I would just drill it out and tap to a standard size. For a collectible, a frankenplane isn’t worth that much on the market. But then again, few Stanley planes are of exceptional rarity to be that valuable anyway.

If you are going to go that kind of trouble, it is more fun to make a plane from scratch.

-- Woodworking shouldn't cost a fortune: http://lowbudgetwoodworker.blogspot.com/

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

544 posts in 1933 days


#10 posted 03-28-2013 02:05 AM

We make a lot of parts, plane irons, and much of the tooling we use.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14118 posts in 989 days


#11 posted 03-28-2013 02:25 AM

When I worked in the machine shop it wouldn’t have been a problem. Like everything else, if you have the right tools.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Emma Walker's profile

Emma Walker

560 posts in 762 days


#12 posted 03-28-2013 04:11 AM

Not really interested but just as a question… would it be a patten crime to mass produce Stanley frog bolts, adjusting knobs and nuts in order to sell them?

-- I'm a twisted 2x4 in a pile of straight lumber.

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1376 posts in 835 days


#13 posted 03-28-2013 04:24 AM

No, patents wouldn’t be the issue. It’d be tough to make it financially worthwhile with the Stanley replacement kits, which are $15.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View Don W's profile

Don W

15018 posts in 1219 days


#14 posted 03-28-2013 11:42 AM

A knurling tool will be in my near future, but a file can make a decent looking knob.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View anneb3's profile

anneb3

35 posts in 205 days


#15 posted 02-25-2014 10:33 PM

fifty dollars plus shipping will get you a 12-20 die-if he has any on EBAY
My brother is the lathe guy using an old Southbend. If he would get his act together and set up the tooling we would not have to search for junkers. Lathe work is not my specialty. I don’t even know if you can cut out of date sizes.

My brother checks all the yard sales so I told him to buy old planes, rusted or not- missing parts, missing handles just as long as the rods are there and the price is right. 2 or 3 days and lots of oil will usually break the rod free.

My used tool store gets around 20.00 apiece for real junkers. I think one of the fellows who works there grabs the good Stanly one, cause I did not see any of them in the junker pile.

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase