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I just bought a new INCRA 1000SE miter so now I need to square my Unisaw

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Forum topic by Airspeed posted 03-27-2013 10:35 PM 1088 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Airspeed

425 posts in 591 days


03-27-2013 10:35 PM

I’ve been wanting to replace the four Delta miters I use with an INCRA miter for a long time so I finally ordered a 1000SE that will be here tomorrow. I’ve been using the four miters I have for years, I set each one at angles I use most often and cranked them down so they wouldn’t move and still had to mess with them all the time. Anyway I am thinking this would be a good time to square up my Unisaw so the new miter will actually make a difference! My saw is what I would consider close but I know it’s out a little (maybe a lot in some opinions!) and have been compensating for it for a few years. I’ve looked up several threads on the subject and each goes about it a little different, is there a thread or link to a method that most would agree is the proper or best method? Thanks!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/


14 replies so far

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1141 posts in 2168 days


#1 posted 03-27-2013 11:17 PM

First set the blade parallel to the miter slot, them calibrate the 1000se to the blade.

I have essentially the same Incra miter and this is how I did it.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View Kwit's profile

Kwit

90 posts in 648 days


#2 posted 03-28-2013 12:16 AM

If it’s in your budget – Incra has the Alignment tools to help align all your shop tools

I just did the same – but I had an older version of the Incra mitre fence; I was using a combi-square that was slightly (very slightly) off. So I was running into problems with projects – even though I was checking every cut (however – it was a faulty square)

After the alignment with the Incra A-line it tool – everything is puppies and roses…. perfectly square cuts and no blade burns on my rips

-- don't talk about it - be about it

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1141 posts in 2168 days


#3 posted 03-28-2013 12:20 AM

I used the A line it to set the blade then an artist triangle to set the miter.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View mdawson2's profile

mdawson2

35 posts in 662 days


#4 posted 03-28-2013 02:03 AM

I just aligned my saw last night. I bought a used Grizzly G1023SL and it came with a woodhaven miter gauge. I bought a dial indicator for $15 at harbor freight, took a scrap block wood, drilled a hole on the side of the block and screwed the dial indicator into it. Next I clamped the block to the miter gauge and checked the blade parallel to the miter slot, first by checking the front, then rotating the saw blade back to check the same tooth. Got it perfectly aligned in no time. Next I used the same miter slot to align the fence. It went even quicker.

There are several videos on YouTube that show the process. I found most of them helpful.

View darthford's profile

darthford

532 posts in 613 days


#5 posted 03-28-2013 02:30 AM

Another vote for A-line-it, I set/checked 90 and 45 with a Starrett combo square and confirmed with an electronic angle meter, the Starrett still has its stuff the electronic angle meter reported 89.8 degrees and 45.1 degrees both within the meters margin of error.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1769 posts in 1318 days


#6 posted 03-28-2013 02:49 PM

once the incra gets to you try this:

adjust the incra’s miter bar to eliminate as much slop as possible. square the miter gauge to the blade. adjust table until .000” @ front of blade is .000” with the same blade tooth rotated to the rear of the throat plate. a $10 dial gauge form harbor freight and a bolt with a couple of nuts are all that’s needed in conjunction with your incra 1000 (which is the same miter gauge i use occasionally). redirect the money that would be wasted on the align-it to useful accessories, like good blades. just my $.02.

BTW, that first pic is the front of the thoat plate. here’s the same blade tooth rotated to the rear of the throat plate (on a 40YO emerson electric built c-man contractor saw with the dreaded table mounted trunions):

perfect alignment is really pretty simple and can be accomplished without additional expense.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 591 days


#7 posted 03-28-2013 03:11 PM

I want to align my miter slot to the blade and I’m wondering more about which bolt to pivot the table on, the process of loosening the cast iron table of my unisaw. Is there a certain sequence I should follow thats specific to the unisaw? Thanks!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1539 days


#8 posted 03-28-2013 03:16 PM

No preferred sequence. Just loosen them all and get the lid where you want it and snug it down, checking as you go. Pretty straightforward.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View dahenley's profile

dahenley

127 posts in 782 days


#9 posted 03-28-2013 03:20 PM

if you go to grizzly.com, they have videos and have one that shows how to align a table saw. they show a cabinet saw which will help you with your unisaw. and it describes which bolts and how to do it.

-- David Henley

View RockyTopScott's profile

RockyTopScott

1141 posts in 2168 days


#10 posted 03-28-2013 03:58 PM

I loosen all but one bolt on the front of the saw then bump the table in place and tighten them all down.

-- “When you want to help people, you tell them the truth. When you want to help yourself, you tell them what they want to hear.” ― Thomas Sowell

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1848 days


#11 posted 03-28-2013 04:04 PM

Yep, like Scott said. Leave one bolt tight. Knock it with a hammer (on scrap board) or a mallet.This helps to assure that you don’t over knock it. That’s the cool thing with cabinet mounted trunnions…it’s really quite painless.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View toolie's profile

toolie

1769 posts in 1318 days


#12 posted 03-28-2013 08:03 PM

try the procedure used by marc spagnuolo:

http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/videos/tablesaw-setup-tuneup-pt-1/

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 591 days


#13 posted 03-29-2013 08:29 PM

I finally got my table square, took awhile because I tried pivoting the table on the front left bolt, I couldn’t get the back of the table to move, it would move about a 32nd but that’s it and I beat on it hard with a dead blow mallet. I finally gave up and tried pivoting it on the left rear bolt and it finally moved. I got the Incra squared and was pleasantly surprised how much nicer my cuts are! Not just square but much cleaner, I had no idea that the tiny bit of play in the miter slot using my old miters was causing such a problem, I always held the miter tight against the blade side of the slot. I’m sure squaring the table helped a lot as well. I did find one issue about the Incra I don’t like, the protractor flexes making the fence move very slightly back, other than that I’m very happy with it. Thanks again for the help!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2866 posts in 1933 days


#14 posted 03-29-2013 09:31 PM

While making sure the blade is parallel to the miter slot and 90° to the top, you need to go the extra step and check the blade itself and the arbor. If the arbor has any play or runout what-so-ever, the blade will not cut perfectly straight. A blade can get distorted because of overtightening the nut or from overheating. If the blade is not sharpened correctly, it can cut more on one side than the other. The more care you take in making sure all parts of the saw are working and aligned as they should, the better will be your results.

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