LumberJocks

Designing a Woodworking Project

  • Advertise with us

« back to Designing Woodworking Projects forum

Forum topic by MrRon posted 03-26-2013 10:17 PM 869 views 0 times favorited 23 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2880 posts in 1940 days


03-26-2013 10:17 PM

I design projects all the time and I am currently working on one that may be of interest to others on this forum. My shop has all the power tools to build almost anything. That includes woodworking and metalworking machines and welding equipment. With that capability, my designs can incorporate machined and welded parts in addition to wood parts. Since this is a woodworking forum, I don’t expect many to have metal working or welding equipment or skills. I know there probably are a few who do, but not many.

My question comes down to; would a project presented to this forum that requires some machined parts be restrictive? In my designs, I try to use hardware and fasteners that are readily available off-the-shelf. Some of these items are fairly expensive and that is why I try to make them myself. Some items for example cost $8.00 apiece and I need 8 of them. I can make them for the cost of one item as the machining is very simple and easy, but you need a lathe to make it. One option is to provide a kit of parts for the project. Naturally there would be a charge for this. A complete list of materials would be provided with the drawings plus sourcing for off-the-shelf parts.

Currently, I have a design for an adjustable height workbench. I’m starting to build a prototype to make sure it works. During this startup, I will be making changes to try and keep costs down. There is an adjustable bench drawing set on the internet. My bench is an original design. I humbly believe mine is better.


23 replies so far

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

813 posts in 1762 days


#1 posted 03-27-2013 01:27 AM

Ron, this sounds like a very interesting idea can’t wait to hear and see more.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

1046 posts in 722 days


#2 posted 03-27-2013 04:12 AM

I do some metal work, though I don’t have a lathe or mill. But I weld and fabricate quite a bit of stuff, sometimes in conjunction with a woodworking project. Often it has to do with a jig or fitting or modification of a tool. For example, I built a true rack and pinion fence system for my Unisaw. The rails telescope, which gives me added capacity when I need it, but can stay compact the rest of the time in my crowded shop. I even gained more than the usual capacity to the left of the blade.

I’d like to see your ideas too.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2590 days


#3 posted 03-27-2013 04:29 AM

too much of my working life involves steel, to which some claim isnt structural and the voices of those with an opinion rise up, due to the fact that it raises the ire of their paycheque, versus those who claim its aesthetically pleasing where the end result is suddenly faded by facts.

Steel, whether we like or not, is part of the world to which “joinery” and “woodworking”and “steel” meld.

Like ying and yang, they need each other.

Everything in between is subjective

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1561 days


#4 posted 03-27-2013 05:55 AM

If it has to do with woodworking its relevant. Many have a keen interest in the metal side of things, but as you say are likely not set up to do any significant fabrication. Willl be interested in seeing this adjustable height work bench you are talking about.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2590 days


#5 posted 03-27-2013 06:13 AM

first test to my right hand man

make a bench starting now

you have one hour to make it work, a 200 dollar budget which includes your wages, it has to hold 1,000 pounds and last 12 months

only then will I entertain a stupid idea

so how would yours hold up as the best invented bench yet ?

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2880 posts in 1940 days


#6 posted 03-27-2013 09:38 PM

I made a quick sketch to give you some idea of what my bench will look like and do. Casters in the legs will retract automatically as the bench is elevated. They have a capacity of over 1000# per set. The height of the top will be 31” above the floor and elevate to 41”. The range of operating heights can be adjusted by changing some of the parts dimensions. Drive will be by (2) trailer jacks operating from a common shaft. The shaft can be driven by a cordless drill. The clamping devices will operate simultaneously on all legs once the desired height is obtained. The controls have been purposely located to eliminate having to stoop or kneel. This feature should help people with bad backs, like mine. The top is left to the users preference. Solid wood, plywood, MDF or a torsion box can be used.
I also have a similar bench design that uses (2) scissors jacks with a better operating height range, but right now my preference is for the trailer jacks. I welcome any comments and concerns you may have. As I stated originally, I’m trying to keep the cost down by using off-the-shelf parts where needed. I estimate the cost to build this bench, less the finished top to be under $200.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

1046 posts in 722 days


#7 posted 03-27-2013 09:53 PM

You’ll be raising all 4 legs with 2 jacks? I’m curious how that will work. Or will you just raise the bench top?

I have built a work support with roller top using a trailer jack. It is heavy, and far more solid than any commercially available work support. I bought another jack (different style crank, though) to make another one.

Good luck with your project. I can see the usefulness of being able to adjust height for different phases of a project—making components vs. assembly, for example.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2880 posts in 1940 days


#8 posted 03-27-2013 10:18 PM

The jacks will be mounted along the long centerline and will raise only the top. The legs are essentially columns that ride inside another column.

View mbs's profile

mbs

1462 posts in 1637 days


#9 posted 03-28-2013 02:33 AM

I like mixing metal and wood. One of my current benches is made with a metal frame and inset cabinet. It’s served me well. With the metal cross members on the back and ends it doesn’t move whatsoever. It’s so heavy that it takes 3 men to slide it a foot at a time.

I also made a computer desk out of metal and wood.

-- Sorry the reply is so long. I didn't have time to write a short reply.

View Dark_Lightning's profile

Dark_Lightning

1773 posts in 1806 days


#10 posted 03-28-2013 02:59 AM

I’d love to see whatever you come up with. I have all the woodworking tools I need, an oxyacetylene rig, and access to a metal machining mill and lathe. I also do copper smithing, and patination of my projects. Bring it! The worst that could happen is maybe someone comes up with a workaround for your metal feature using wood. I personally would like your creativity to be presented.

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 599 days


#11 posted 03-28-2013 03:24 AM

I’ve been designing a chair in my head for some time that incorporates cast aluminum, I built a foundry and learned to cast aluminum just for this project, I also set up an anodizing system to anodize these parts. I think wood and metal definately have a place together!

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2880 posts in 1940 days


#12 posted 03-28-2013 04:20 PM

Airspeed, [I think wood and metal definately have a place together!] Not saying they don’t, but I doubt people are going to go buy a lathe or milling machine just to make a part for a woodworking project.

View Airspeed's profile

Airspeed

425 posts in 599 days


#13 posted 03-28-2013 04:27 PM

Why would you need a mill to include metal in a woodworking project?

-- http://smg.photobucket.com/albums/v655/aaronhero/

View JayT's profile

JayT

2445 posts in 908 days


#14 posted 03-28-2013 04:36 PM

I don’t do metal work, so I may not be able to make your exact project. If I want to build something similar, my options are to either find another way to build the same thing with the tools and abilities I have, buy the appropriate tools or purchase those parts I cannot create myself.

How is this any different than many other projects posted? There are great projects that involve the use of a scroll saw or lathe, which I do not have. If I want to build one of those, the options are the same as above.

My question comes down to; would a project presented to this forum that requires some machined parts be restrictive?

So with the above in mind, my answer is that yes, the project is restrictive in some ways, but no more so than projects that are made of only wood. If you are doing woodwork as part of the project, it is appropriate and I would love to see it.

-- "The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public's money." Alexis de Tocqueville, 1835

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

2880 posts in 1940 days


#15 posted 03-29-2013 09:02 PM

Airspeed, Most metal parts I use can be made on a lathe. I just happen to own a lathe, so any metal parts that I need, I can make, although I try not to. One metalworking job as an example, involves making (8) 1/2” diameter pins x 7” long with one end turned and threaded 3/8”-16. The material to make them would cost around $6.00. An alternative would be to use 1/2” x 7” hex or square head bolts, but they cost about $7.00 each. That is why I need to machine them. Wood would not be a suitable substitute. Metal is used only where it is necessary. It’s hard to escape “crossover” projects.

showing 1 through 15 of 23 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase