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Tool Find: Not a mysterious function, but a question remains

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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 03-26-2013 03:07 PM 1537 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1604 days


03-26-2013 03:07 PM

Purchased at a second hand store yesterday. 7 5/8” long overall. Shown with a 6” rule for clarity.

I have found a few references on the web, including a vintage blurb in Popular Science or Mechanics, can’t remember which, and there’s one currently listed on ebay. (Same company, but different address, be it noted.)

So we know what it does, but what in the furshlugginer world do the fractions mean?

I’m counting on LJ here. One sleepless night is enough, thank you very much.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


15 replies so far

View Tim's profile

Tim

1394 posts in 715 days


#1 posted 03-26-2013 04:24 PM

Looks like you have a center finder there. Ok, kidding. It also looks like that center pin is reversible and can come in from the other side, thus referencing off the other side’s posts. Are the posts offset by 1/2” and 3/8” inch from the center of that reversible pin? Or at least differ by 1/8”? Links to what you did find might be helpful.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3572 posts in 1567 days


#2 posted 03-26-2013 04:35 PM

Are the 1/2” and 3/8” simply the diameters of the pins used in this model?

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

2145 posts in 1005 days


#3 posted 03-26-2013 04:40 PM

I looked on line for information about Ring Masters, Inc. or Bulls Eye Center Finder. No luck there. Maybe the 1/2” and 3/8” pins are for finding the center of rabbeted stock—just a guess though.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1604 days


#4 posted 03-26-2013 04:44 PM

We’ve got some momentum here.

The center pin is indeed reversible, held by an eentsy (tech term) spring loaded ball. Tug it out and put it in the other way for use with the larger span pins.

The four pins are .25 and are firmly seated and centered in the bar.

The pins are symmetrically located from the center.

The section of the bar is 1/2×3/4.

The magazine blurb was just a description and a picture, much as you see in woodworking mags today and then, mysteriously, a few pages later there’s a paid ad for the very same product.

The mystery remains unsolved but I’m feeling a little better.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Loren's profile

Loren

7826 posts in 2401 days


#5 posted 03-26-2013 04:48 PM

Just to muddy the waters a bit…

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Chris Matthews's profile

Chris Matthews

21 posts in 1534 days


#6 posted 03-26-2013 04:54 PM

Lee,
what is the spacing between the pins on each side

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BinghamtonEd

1593 posts in 1123 days


#7 posted 03-26-2013 05:05 PM

Maybe that’s why it says patent pending. The patent office is still trying to figure it out, too.

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1604 days


#8 posted 03-26-2013 05:05 PM

2.751 between the nearers which would be 3.01 o.c.

Looks to be 6.5 between the farthers

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View upinflames's profile

upinflames

96 posts in 915 days


#9 posted 03-27-2013 12:57 AM

Hey Lee, It should work on the same line as this one http://lumberjocks.com/projects/40510. Handy little tools.

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1604 days


#10 posted 04-02-2013 03:16 PM

Well I took the thang to the meeting last night of the Central Oregon Woodworkers and we are closer to the answer.

At least we know what the fractions refer to.
Referring to the outer pins, one is 3/8” from the end of the bar to the pin, the other, no surprise now, 1/2”.

What exactly is the value of having these two absolutes aboard a device which finds centers? That’s the remaining question. But I find comfort in knowing THAT they’re there and where they are.

My thanks to Jeff F. and those around him who figured this much out. Smart folks, all of them.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View upinflames's profile

upinflames

96 posts in 915 days


#11 posted 04-02-2013 04:07 PM

Lee, I found this, http://www.salespider.com/b-5633658/portanails-inc seems PNI makes them now. The web site didn’t show the tool but they do have a phone number.

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15817 posts in 2972 days


#12 posted 04-02-2013 05:37 PM

Lee, on the pins that are farthest apart: Are they both equidistant from the center pin?

If they are not, I was thinking there might be a 1/8” offset to account for finding the usable center of rough lumber that has only been straight line ripped on one edge.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View John Ormsby's profile

John Ormsby

1281 posts in 2490 days


#13 posted 04-02-2013 06:10 PM

I am willing to bet this is part of the Ringmaster bowl company. It is a center finder for bowl blanks. They are located in North Carolina. The one on Ebay is from the same town.

-- Oldworld, Fair Oaks, Ca

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1604 days


#14 posted 04-03-2013 03:05 PM

Charlie, yes, everything, pinwise and centerwise, is symmetrical. Very creative thought though!

It’s easy to think that the 3/8 and 1/2 ends are just for some kind of convenience, but if one were doing that, wouldn’t you make those two distances 3/8 and 5/8 since the bar itself is 1/2×3/4?

I’m curious to hear more about the Ringmaster and how this might be a part of using it. Perhaps that will up the wattage shining on this delightful conundrum.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View holzkopf's profile

holzkopf

3 posts in 351 days


#15 posted 01-10-2014 09:33 PM

I picked up one of these center finders in an auction sale this last summer and I too was wondering what those two fractional numbers were used for. I believe I have the definitive answer.
My center finder is a smaller model (320) with pins on one side only instead of that larger model 365 shown but the same rules would apply.

If you measure from the outside of either of the ¼” pins, it will measure exactly ½” or ⅜” to its respective edge of the tool. This could be used to quickly mark a line ⅜” from an edge for lets say, to mark where you may want to drive some screws or nails to fasten another piece.

It looks like one handy little tool.

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