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Corrugated Fastener vs Pin Nailer

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Forum topic by RonInOhio posted 03-26-2013 05:24 AM 1753 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RonInOhio

720 posts in 1549 days


03-26-2013 05:24 AM

Just was wondering if a corrugated fastener gun is needed or advantageous for face frames if one
already owns a pin nailer.

I can see some advantages with the corrugated fastener.
Strength being one. Also seems the ease of applying the fastener
on a back face as opposed to a nail on the edge would make
corrugated fasteners easier to use.

Anyone have both and which one do you prefer ?


8 replies so far

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Loren

7714 posts in 2333 days


#1 posted 03-26-2013 05:25 AM

Are you a pro?

Are you looking at joining mitered face frames? Are
you looking at joining standard face frames?

A pin nailer is nice, but in face frame work, it is
usually used, if at all, for nailing the frame to the
carcase.

Pocket holes and dowels are most common among
lower volume shops for face frame joinery. Personally
I think both are overkill unless you can save sanding
time by using them. An old cabinet guy who used
staples asked me, “what are you trying to prove?
nobody will look and most clients don’t know
enough to care.”

Attachment to the carcase strengthens a face frame
considerably. In cabinets screwed to studs, butted
and stapled joints are adequate, if inelegant.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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RonInOhio

720 posts in 1549 days


#2 posted 03-26-2013 05:27 AM

No Loren, not a pro. Might do kitchen cabinets down the road. Would entail a lot of face frame
work I would think. As well as some cabinets for shop.

Actually, I don’t even own a compressor or pin nailer yet .

Thanks for your fast reply.

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Loren

7714 posts in 2333 days


#3 posted 03-26-2013 05:39 AM

If you are tooling up for furniture and built-ins, a modern
dowel jig like a Dowelmax or Jessem is a nice investment.
They deliver flush frame surfaces well.

Pocket hole jigs are a popular solution but I’m kind of
soured on the appearance and alignment issues.
Holes can be plugged, but it takes time and fussing
and alignment issues can be solved but not
easily without more investment.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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RonInOhio

720 posts in 1549 days


#4 posted 03-26-2013 05:39 AM

Yeah, the pin nailer is the way I’m leaning as I see where I would likely get a lot
more use out of it. I have a Kreg pocket hole jig.

While on the subject, I was researching the different joining methods. Obviously
pocketholes aren’t really practically or the best solution in many applications.

I was looking at the BeadLock System but have got the impression that
the dowel systems seem to be favored. For me Festool biscuits are out of the
question.

Yes I have heard very good things about the DowelMax. Its nice to not have to
buy a new power tool for every application.

Also am looking at the router mortise and tendon jigs.

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Loren

7714 posts in 2333 days


#5 posted 03-26-2013 05:41 AM

I use dowels. I can do everything but Dominos. Dowels
are my go-to because the alignment saves a lot
of sanding labor.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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RonInOhio

720 posts in 1549 days


#6 posted 03-26-2013 05:43 AM

So in your opinion pin nails and dowels are overkill for most miter and face frames ?

And if I read correctly a simple staple or two of the joint and nailed or screwed to the backing support
is sufficient in most applications ?

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Loren

7714 posts in 2333 days


#7 posted 03-26-2013 05:50 AM

It depends how craftsmanlike you want to get about
woodworking. When a piece is a 3-dimensional form
like a cabinet, all the joints are made stronger. Staples
are ok for picture frames but they aren’t meant for
strain. Nail a picture frame to the front of a plywood
cabinet box, with glue, and the frame keeps the
box square while the box prevents the frame from
torquing.

What is adequate (stapling and nailing with glue) is
not the same as what is satisfying… and when building
freestanding pieces stapling and nailing is not the
route to durable work.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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RonInOhio

720 posts in 1549 days


#8 posted 03-26-2013 05:56 AM

”What is adequate (stapling and nailing with glue) is
not the same as what is satisfying… and when building
freestanding pieces stapling and nailing is not the
route to durable work.”

Yes. I can see where different projects will always call for different
joining techniques both asthetically as well as strength.

For example, splines would likely be more asthetic and add strength as opposed
to nails/staples for a picture frame.

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