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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 386 days ago 563 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

2894 posts in 785 days


386 days ago

I’d like to make some very delicate finials for my bowls but mounting a piece on the lathe is my greatest challenge. I dont want poke marks so I’ve been gluing an old tenon on to the drive end and just using another tenon on the tail end, but nothing seems to hold through the entire turning process.

I am ordering a hot glue gun now and I’d lilke to know if there are any special glue sticks I should order to go along with it for this purpose.

I’ve tried Titebond, and CA and nothing seems to hold.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


15 replies so far

View Kreegan's profile

Kreegan

1452 posts in 645 days


#1 posted 386 days ago

Do you have a collet chuck? That seems to be the most common way to hold finials that I’ve seen. PSI sells a nice one for around 80.

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RussellAP

2894 posts in 785 days


#2 posted 386 days ago

Rich, one of the things I want to avoid is not being able to use the entire blank. Most pen blanks are only about 4” long so by the time you chuck it, you’ve lost an inch. Ideally I want to extend the blank on both ends and that way I can turn the entire thing.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Mip's profile

Mip

294 posts in 576 days


#3 posted 386 days ago

You can always make your own collet chuck. Take your smallest face plate, mount a 3×3” block about 3 or 4 inches long to it, turn the block round, drill a hole in the end opposite the faceplate, take this assembly to the bandsaw and saw some kerfs through the hole and put on a small hose clamp on that end. Now when you turn the rough lumber for the spires, turn one end into a tenon the same size as the hole in your chuck, mount it in the chuck and tighten down the hose clamp to hold the wood. Now you can turn the spires whatever design you want.

View Wildwood's profile

Wildwood

849 posts in 633 days


#4 posted 386 days ago

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2894 posts in 785 days


#5 posted 386 days ago

Bill, yes, finials. The word escapes me.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3421 posts in 2161 days


#6 posted 386 days ago

Russell … I have had good luck gluing small finial blanks to a waste block using Weldbond … http://www.weldbond.com .

I use waste blocks screwed to face plates, but it is just as easy to cut a tenon and use them in a chuck.

I support the other end with the tailstock until I need to turn the tip. Note that Weldbond is not a fast-drying glue

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View REO's profile

REO

541 posts in 572 days


#7 posted 386 days ago

the end grain will always make a weak glue joint. back drill the stock for a dowel and glue the dowel in place. chuck up the dowel portion and do your turning. part off the dowel and if you want to back drill again, using the shavings as a filler to fill the hole and hide the dowell. very delicate finials are usualy progressively turned from the tailstock end and never use the tailstock for support except for initial rounding of the blank.

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Wildwood

849 posts in 633 days


#8 posted 386 days ago

Learning to turn finals lot easier practicing on scrap wood turning between centers whether want short or long finials. You can get basic shape including tenon with tailstock support. Mark off waste allowance with pencil lines on left and right of finial. Turn your finial leaving enough wood to support as you go. I work from tip back to bead or onion, tenon, then sand. Will take a parting tool and part half way on tenon end so can saw off later. Then take a skew and finish tip. Apply finish off lathe.

Do about the same when blank mounted in my chuck. Only difference except once get basic shape remove tailstock support and continue turning, sanding, finishing.

Use thin parting, Bedan, ½ “ skew, and 3/8 “ spindle gouge to turn finials. One old spindle gouge been modified into detail gouge.

Wish had a ¼” round skew. Thought about getting a step center but my 2 prong drive center works so will save my money. Besides chuck with right jaws makes live easier.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=packard&Product_Code=110601&Category_Code=lathes-acc-cent-steb

-- Bill

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bondogaposis

2222 posts in 849 days


#9 posted 386 days ago

A collet chuck is the way to go. Watch this video, very little waste.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Kreegan's profile

Kreegan

1452 posts in 645 days


#10 posted 386 days ago

Jinx, Bondo! I was just about to post a link to that. :-D

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2894 posts in 785 days


#11 posted 386 days ago

@Bondo, I’m going to work on this today, I think my drill collet might work in the drive side. So all I need is to make a tenon that will fit it.
I need a poster of Capt Eddie in my shop.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3421 posts in 2161 days


#12 posted 386 days ago

Russell—Capt Eddie will probably have the posters available in the Fall Catalog. :>}

Seriously … if you have a Jacobs chuck, you can make that work, too. But the colletts available from http://www.littlemachineshop.com too.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2894 posts in 785 days


#13 posted 386 days ago

Gerry, I just turned my first finial. Forget the type of wood, but it was pretty soft.

I used my regular chuck, but held the 3/4×3/4 piece inside where the jaws have about 4mm grab. It’s just enough with the tail stock to get a tenon out of before it goes flying, and fly it does.

After the tenon I chuck in my drill chuck on the drive side and using the tail stock I can turn it out.

I finished up on the grind wheel that I use to sharpen tools. I think it came out pretty well. I’ll post it in forums.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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jtriggs

57 posts in 2315 days


#14 posted 384 days ago

Loved that video from Capt. Eddie. Went right to the littlemachineshop.com website and ordered 3 #2 MT collets. Only $33. Got a 1/4”, 3/8” and 1/2”. That should cover anything I want to make.

Now I just need the skill to turn those fine, delicate parts. I’m more of a table-leg-turning guy.

Glad to see this woodturning forum on LJs. A good place for sharing info. Believe me I’m getting more information than I can give at this time. Thanks to all who contribute.
Jon

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RussellAP

2894 posts in 785 days


#15 posted 384 days ago

JOn, you’re right, there is a lot to learn about turning finials. I most likely don’t have the right tools so I’m looking into bulk HSS so I can mill my own.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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