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Forum topic by RussellAP posted 03-25-2013 06:05 PM 739 views 1 time favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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RussellAP

2950 posts in 942 days


03-25-2013 06:05 PM

I turn a lot of bowls and drying them has been a problem. So I built this in order to dry several at a time. There are 6 items in it now and they look comfy. It’s completely air tight and draws cigarette smoke in at a good rate. I want the air to heat and dry and circulate at around 80 – 85 degree F till they dry. These have been treated for the last several days with a wood conditioner.

Pardon the shop, I actually work here everyday and I kind of like it messy.

This is where air enters the light/heat box.

This is the light/heat box with both lights on, as you can see the electric is done up proper and the lights are well away from anything and there is a metal shield which directs the air to the kiln with a generous opening.

Top shelf.

middle shelf.

bottom shelf.

Fan assembly in rear.

So lets hope it works without tweaking it.
Im using tape to keep the doors shut until I can think of a better way. I think I’ll probably just keep it with tape because it holds that flimsy door in place well. I just didnt’ want to spring for a 50$ piece of 1/4.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.


16 replies so far

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4330 posts in 1704 days


#1 posted 03-25-2013 06:27 PM

“Pardon the shop, I actually work here everyday and I kind of like it messy”
I am very surprised when I read that, I am exactly the opposite , mess drive nuts and I cannot stand it.
I clean my shop every night.

-- Bert

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3249 posts in 662 days


#2 posted 03-25-2013 06:38 PM

Since 9th grade science taught us that “heat rises”, I’m wondering why you put the light (the heat source) in the top instead of the bottom of the cabinet? If the heat source was at the bottom, you might could have done without the fan, and simply put a few vent holes in the top to let the excess heat escape.
(Not being critical of your kiln, just curious.)

And dont apologize for your mess. Mine is usually worse :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2747 days


#3 posted 03-25-2013 06:43 PM

Should the pics be part of original post? I don’t see any pictures.

Bert, I sweep each night when I work in the shop as I hate getting a lecture from my wife (tracking sawdust and shavings through the house). When I’m working, I do tend to leave tools around and won’t put them away till I’m done with the current project with the exception of my workbench.

-- Nicky

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2950 posts in 942 days


#4 posted 03-25-2013 06:59 PM

Joe, you’re not actually pulling the hot air down, in fact you don’t want to do that. You want the hot air in the chamber to dry the air and then it mixes with the air in the kiln to help the bowls evaporate slowly. I’ve had it on for two hours and the heat inside the middle cabinet is about 65 which is about 5 degree’s higher than the shop at the moment. I plan to take this into my PC room where the air is controlled better. I have the capability in that room to make it hot or cold fast in winter. Not much control in summer. I keep the windows open and have a fan drawing air out because I smoke in that room. Over the years I’ve come up with creative ways to keep it comfortable in there so the kiln will go there. It should be about 80-85 then which is pretty good for drying bowls slowly and by slowly I mean about 4 days on the outside, some take less.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

2950 posts in 942 days


#5 posted 03-25-2013 07:04 PM

Bert, I like the idea of waiting till a nice day and taking my air gun and blowing everything outside then I sweep and blow more out of the corners. It’s an all day project but I can find things when I need them. Problem is I track the lathe stuff all over. I need a sand box to put that thing in. I’m going to build me another bench for it with wheels so I can run it outside and work there. It’s just too messy and I’m too tired and or have too much to do to keep cleaning all the time. I make on average about 5 pieces a week, so cleaning would be a full time job for some kid. Too bad mine is in college.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

2950 posts in 942 days


#6 posted 03-25-2013 07:04 PM

Nicky, I think you have a PC problem. The pics are there.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2747 days


#7 posted 03-25-2013 07:10 PM

Russell, I’m at work, using Firefox. Can’t wait to see these pics when I get home.

-- Nicky

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RussellAP

2950 posts in 942 days


#8 posted 03-25-2013 07:12 PM

Nicky, It’s not pretty by any means, and I could probably have found a contaner or even bought one that would look better, but if it’s functional I really don’t care.

If it was pretty I’d list it in projects but I’m too embarrassed. lol

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3249 posts in 662 days


#9 posted 03-25-2013 10:26 PM

I say It aint gotta be pretty, so long as it functional! :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Nicky's profile

Nicky

636 posts in 2747 days


#10 posted 03-25-2013 11:49 PM

Russ, i can see the pics.

Its pretty cool! if it does the trick, well then, its beautiful.

-- Nicky

View David Dean's profile

David Dean

521 posts in 1554 days


#11 posted 03-26-2013 12:41 AM

sweet a mimi kiln

View NGK's profile

NGK

93 posts in 566 days


#12 posted 03-26-2013 02:51 AM

Before reading the other posts, my mind immediately went back to junior high science, like JoeIn10asee’s did. Put your heat source in the bottom chamber. Then the “rising heat”—the old chimney effect known as convection currents—will waffle up through your vent holes through all chambers. Once the system is loaded and stabilizes for 24 hours or so, move the thermometer from chamber to chamber to read the differences in temperature. There might be an advantage to move pieces UP or DOWN, so certain pieces could have a different “climate” for their early or late period in the drying cycle. OR have multiple sockets for light bulbs (heat source) to vary the drying rates. Remember that objects (blanks) in the same chamber as the heat source will also heat up and dry from radiant energy, too. And it looks like the outer walls of your box could use a layer of rigid insulation.

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2950 posts in 942 days


#13 posted 03-26-2013 03:05 AM

NGK, You are right and if I was drying these bowls via heat, that’s what I would have done, however I did it this way for two reasons.
1, bowl dry best with dry air flow. Heat causes them to crack and warp because the moisture exits too quickly causing the fibers to draw together. If you do it at a slow enough rate the fibers will dry before they draw down preventing the disfigurement. Some woods are better than others for this, like maple, box elder, are excellent woods to dry, but red elm is a challenge. I only buy red elm dry anymore.

2, A kiln with the heat source on the bottom will be much harder to control the temp in. The heat wants to rise as you say, so you’d have to have some thermostat in it. With the heat box on the top, I draw some into the first chamber, which is standing at about 78 F at the moment, and the second is much cooler at about 66 and the third is about 62. So when a bowl goes in it starts at the bottom and works its way up.

It’s the air flow that does the drying, so with my design the heat box raises the temperature which lowers the humidity and then the air is drawn into the drying chamber. I’m considering installing a small PC fan in each shelf floor to help with the air flow if needed. It might become necessary in the summer but not now.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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RussellAP

2950 posts in 942 days


#14 posted 03-26-2013 01:47 PM

Thank you David. It was fun to build. I finally got rid of all that pressed wood that used to be mom and dad’s entertainment center.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4330 posts in 1704 days


#15 posted 03-26-2013 02:37 PM

Rusell, Thank you for you reply.
Do you make bowls just for the fun of it or do you sale them? ( I guess that you might do both)

-- Bert

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