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How to inlay this mopani strip into this oak slot?

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Forum topic by Prizen posted 03-24-2013 10:40 PM 1371 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Prizen

18 posts in 1382 days


03-24-2013 10:40 PM

Hi guys,

A few questions that I hope you can help me with.
I have a slot made in some oak moulding. Into this slot I wish to fit some mopani inlay.Please see photo attached.

I have cut the mopani inlay, and it is slightly too wide to fit the slot.
Q1. How best can I size the mopani? Sand it down by hand, plane it, some other way??

When I do get the mopani to fit the slot, it will be about 2mm proud of the oak.

Q2. Is sanding it down by hand the best way to bring it flush?

The oak moulding is a long continuous piece, but the mopani is in much smaller sections of length.Therefore I will have to joint pieces of mopani together. I’m afaid that these joint will look at little rough.

Q3. What is the best way to join the mopani pieces together?

r


12 replies so far

View Marcus's profile

Marcus

1149 posts in 1481 days


#1 posted 03-24-2013 10:46 PM

1. A quick swipe or two with a block plane and you should be good.
2. See #1
3. If you have nice square cuts, you probably won’t notice it too much. You could sand over the joints while the glue is a tiny bit tacky still and let the glue and saw dust fill the crack.

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Prizen

18 posts in 1382 days


#2 posted 03-24-2013 10:51 PM

Thanks Marcus – i am going to order a block plane, but there are many different number block planes.
What number do you think would be best for this application?

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4024 posts in 1813 days


#3 posted 03-24-2013 11:18 PM

If you are going to buy a new plane the Veritas low angle block is probably the best deal out there. Otherwise and older Stanley 601/2 would be a cheaper option if you know how restore one, they can be found on ebay frequently.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Prizen's profile

Prizen

18 posts in 1382 days


#4 posted 03-24-2013 11:33 PM

Thanks guys, I will go for a veritas la block – i hope i am not now on a slippery slope of hand planes!

View richardwootton's profile

richardwootton

1699 posts in 1417 days


#5 posted 03-25-2013 12:01 AM

You are. I’m going tomorrow to look at a fairly large collection of planes from an old retired woodworker. I’m not telling my girlfriend where I’m going.

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

7167 posts in 2260 days


#6 posted 03-25-2013 12:06 AM

Gluing your pieces end to end into one long strip first using scarfs of at least 4:1 will make the joints just about disappear. You can scarf first and glue as you go too but I’d rather do it first if it were me.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

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Prizen

18 posts in 1382 days


#7 posted 03-25-2013 12:27 AM

thanks Shipwirght – how would I cut the scraft joints? Would a Veritas 16 tpi crosscut saw in a mitre box do the job nicely?

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shipwright

7167 posts in 2260 days


#8 posted 03-25-2013 01:15 AM

That would work. You could tune them with a stationary disc or belt sander if they needed it.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fibreglass trees. http://thecanadianschooloffrenchmarquetry.com/

View Prizen's profile

Prizen

18 posts in 1382 days


#9 posted 03-29-2013 09:28 PM

Hey guys,

Well my Veritas LA block plane has arrived. Forgive me as I am a complete newbie here but I am having trouble with this task. Maybe I am trying something that is too advanced for my experience level. Anywho, I am where I am now. The main problems I am having are as follows:

1. When I try to plane the sides of the mopani, sometimes the wood tears out and ruins my strip beyond repair.

2. Sometimes when I plane an edge, I end up taking too much off (as a result, when I put the inlay strip into the slot, there is a noticeable gap).

I guess that it doesnt help that my mopani strips are not quite all of identical thickness and width. I install and piece, and some sections of the strip are ok, and others are too thin and leave a gap.

Are there any step-by-step guides available for this type of work?

Thanks,
Prizen

View oltexasboy1's profile

oltexasboy1

240 posts in 1166 days


#10 posted 01-02-2015 12:54 AM

You are probably doing what I do every once in awhile and that’s get the grain direction wrong. Past that your plane is probably good to go out of the box and don’t need honing but you maybe taking too big a bite. You need to learn how to adjust the plane for the best, thinnest cut you can make and still be taking off some material. Take a look at DonW’s(http://www.timetestedtools.com/) webpage or at least look around to see the best way to adjust and tune a hand plane. It takes awhile to learn ,so be patient. Start on a piece that has no value instead of your good stuff.

-- "The pursuit of perfection often yields excellence"

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2183 posts in 1487 days


#11 posted 01-02-2015 11:34 PM

I would have suggested a drum sander for getting the right thickness, but it appears I’m too late.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View Prizen's profile

Prizen

18 posts in 1382 days


#12 posted 01-03-2015 12:38 AM

Thanks for the replies all. I’ve had to park this project for a whole but will update once I get back on track with it. I have scarfed and glued the strips in. There are lots of undulations etc but may try a drum sander as suggested to see if it will improve things.

Thanks Again

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