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Best Stone for Removing Chips?

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Forum topic by DavidNJ posted 517 days ago 682 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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DavidNJ

384 posts in 620 days


517 days ago

When removing metal after chip on plane is a 220 grit best? If so, is the best solution a water stone, diamond plate, or sandpaper? Wouldn’t a water stone still need a diamond plate or other mechanism for flattening? The diamond stone in the course grit isn’t that expensive and could also be used to flatten waters stones. At this time I’m using 3M micro abrasive lapping paper on a granite slab.


7 replies so far

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Don W

14845 posts in 1195 days


#1 posted 517 days ago

When removing metal after chip on plane is a 220 grit best?
Depends on the size of the chip. If its a good size chip, I would start with 80.

If so, is the best solution a water stone, diamond plate, or sandpaper?
In my opinion, the best solution is a grinder. After that, its a matter of personal preference. I prefer DMT’s, but any quality stone works well.

Wouldn’t a water stone still need a diamond plate or other mechanism for flattening?
Absolutely.

The diamond stone in the course grit isn’t that expensive and could also be used to flatten waters stones.
If that’s a question, the answer is Yes. If its a statement, I agree.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View JustJoe's profile

JustJoe

1554 posts in 665 days


#2 posted 517 days ago

I second the grinder. Stones are for sharpening. Even a coarse one will take forever to remove enough metal to clean up a chip. You can do it – coarse stone of your choosing, or rough grit sandpaper. But you will go through a lot of sandpaper, wear out your stone early, and/or drive yourself crazy with hours of monotonous work.

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bondogaposis

2480 posts in 978 days


#3 posted 517 days ago

If the back is already flat it shouldn’t need re-flattening. Grinding on bench grinder, honing on diamond stone, sharpening on water stones, those are the steps I go through.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1173 posts in 924 days


#4 posted 517 days ago

I’ve had good luck with a belt sander to do that. I find it easier than a grinder as I don’t have any kind of jig and the belt is much wider than a grinder stone, easier for me to get a flat uniform surface.

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RussellAP

2944 posts in 914 days


#5 posted 517 days ago

I use some 40g on my belt sander till the blade is smooth, then work it on a TS surface with paper to about 600g
I wouldn’t use a grinder that can heat the blade up. If you use a grinder use a light touch and don’t heat it up. Have a glass of cold water when you do it to keep it cool. If you get it red hot in only certain parts of the blade and not evenly across the whole blade you’ll end up with different hardness which could cause it to cut weird or be wavy especially as the blade wears.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

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DavidNJ

384 posts in 620 days


#6 posted 517 days ago

I have had bad experience trying to use a belt sander or grinder: I can’t maintain the angle. A tool stand on the grinder may help, but it would need other stuff also and as Russell said heat can anneal the metal. Some of the new blades are have been cryogenically treated; that creates a more complete and more uniform martensite transformation (http://www.substech.com/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=cryogenic_treatment_of_steel)

I use the Lee Valley Veritas Mark II honing guide and like it. It lets be set the base angle and add the micro bevel. Yes, it took a while to take out the chips (I used 220 grit paper). DMT sells the diamond plates with 120 micron / 120 mesh, 60 micron / 220, and 45 micron / 325 mesh. The describe them as extreme removal of material and edge repair, significant removal of material is needed for damaged edges, quickly restore a neglected edge. That isn’t enough of a description for me to understand the differences.

I’m guessing the 325 would be best for flattening stones and the 120 would be to aggressive for that purpose. Is the 220 as good at both? One site recommended using a flat steel plate with diamond paste, the coarsest they sell is 40 micron.

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Deycart

380 posts in 885 days


#7 posted 516 days ago

I use a 30×1 belt sander with a 60 grit zirconium aluminum belts. To maintain a proper angle I bought the tormex bgm-100 and the plane blade jig se-76. It’s a little pricey, but it will take the worst blade and put the correct primary angle on it and then its to the stones for a secondary micro bevel.
http://www.tormek.com/en/accessories/bgm100/index.php
http://www.tormek.com/en/jigs/se76/index.php
The belts are fairly cheap at around 2.00 each for Norton brand on amazon and they last quite a while and are aggressive almost too aggressive. The plus side is that the belt will not heat the blade up very quickly. That’s not to say that you can just go crazy and grind a way, but you would have to be pretty careless to burn an edge.

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