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dry time for 8/4 maple

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Forum topic by Lsmart posted 390 days ago 594 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lsmart

128 posts in 837 days


390 days ago

Hi All,

I do not own a moisture meter.

I have a stack of dry 8/4 maple that was bought about 2 weeks ago, it has been sitting in my very dry (woodstove) kitchen for that time, wondering if anyone has any idea how long I need to leave it before I can work with it.

Thanks

Luke


15 replies so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

10780 posts in 838 days


#1 posted 390 days ago

You bought it a couple weeks ago. More importantly, when was it cut? If you place your hand on them, do they feel cooler than room temperature? If so they are too wet to use.

Moisture meters are sold at most home improvement stores fairly cheap.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View Bill Davis's profile

Bill Davis

226 posts in 2424 days


#2 posted 390 days ago

“Ideas” would only be that – ideas without more information.

To provide an answer that has some validity need to know:

1. What was the original moisture content of the wood? (Too late to get that now but a meter would have given an approximation.)
2. What is the relative humidity where the wood is stored? (A simple inexpensive RH meter would be a valuable thing to have around and would get you close enough.)
3. What final moisture content do you want. (You didn’t say what you will use the wood for hence where the final destination of your project is but my guess is inside the house, yours or someone elses. How dry you want it depends on the average RH of its final resting place.)

Or without a meter you could use the ‘oven dry’ method and measure the actual MC. But you would still need the an accurate scale to weigh a test piece to know your location RH.

Maybe someone would offer a guess.

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

724 posts in 1643 days


#3 posted 390 days ago

Harbor Freight sells a cheap moisture meter that seems to work pretty well.

View Lsmart's profile

Lsmart

128 posts in 837 days


#4 posted 390 days ago

Thanks for your responses guys… I have ordered a MM… seems like the best solution.

The wood was milled quite some time ago I believe, bought from a reputable dealer in vancouver.

The wood will be used to make a table, dry environment.

View woodworker59's profile

woodworker59

558 posts in 701 days


#5 posted 387 days ago

The general rule of thumb is one year of drying time for every inch of thickness.. so a 1 inch board cut and stickered properly would be dry enough to use for furniture in one year.. Most try to get it down to 10% or less moisture content, but sometimes that’s not a possibility.. Where I live in lovely New England, boards that have been stored in my shop for over a year after being dried for a year are never below 12%.. that’s just the relative moisture level in my shop.. unless I want to talk the wife into storing lumber in the living room, I have to deal with 12%.. so far no problems.. just saying.. I own a MM and anyone looking to build much furniture should own one.. there are a lot of wood dealers who will swear its dry enough for furniture when its 18% or higher..SO I don’t buy lumber from anyone without putting my meter on it.. better safe than spit or warped.. Papa

-- Papa@papaswoodworking.com

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2393 days


#6 posted 387 days ago

I always error on the side of caution and encourage being proactive instead of reactive

I like 1 year per inch of thickness + a year so if its an inch thick is 2 years, 2 inches = 3 years

Every year it sits and ages, like fine wine and old cheese…….it only gets better

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Lsmart's profile

Lsmart

128 posts in 837 days


#7 posted 387 days ago

The wood is pretty dry already, moisture meter coming tomorrow.

Thanks Guys

View djwong's profile

djwong

120 posts in 1720 days


#8 posted 387 days ago

One trick I use with wet construction lumber to tell if it is dry, is to weigh it and keep weighing it every few months or so. When the weight stabilizes, I know that it has reached equilibrium with the shop environment. I just write the weight on the board to keep track.

-- David W. Cupertino, CA

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2393 days


#9 posted 387 days ago

I’m always somewhat perplexed at people, how they think that the stamp they buy to put on an envelope to mail to a friend,and include the cost of a birthday card, think they can suddenly buy the same “Wal Mart” moisture meter for a few bucks more, then the price of a stamp and birthday card, and think…………”wow”…….she’s ready ?…cause the moisture meter said so

For some insane reason

I dont think so ?

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2393 days


#10 posted 387 days ago

like a fine wine and old cheese

wood gains patience with time and like a fine wine, either loosing its anger and tension or releasing its propensity to steel thus calming its nerves, either way,

it eventually teaches patience

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

329 posts in 733 days


#11 posted 387 days ago

Weight does work well if you have an accurate scale. Read the instructions on your moisture meter, you may have to apply a correction factor depending on the type of wood being measured.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2393 days


#12 posted 387 days ago

High school math

memories of

C’s and D’s for 9 years in 1st grade

weigh it

before it goes into the oven

and when it leaves

the rest is simple math and observation of reaction over time

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View RonInOhio's profile

RonInOhio

720 posts in 1364 days


#13 posted 387 days ago

”One trick I use with wet construction lumber to tell if it is dry, is to weigh it and keep weighing it every few months or so. When the weight stabilizes, I know that it has reached equilibrium with the shop environment. I just write the weight on the board to keep track.”

Thanks djwong. That really does make a lot sense.

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2393 days


#14 posted 387 days ago

math

coming to Ohio soon

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Loren's profile

Loren

6746 posts in 2148 days


#15 posted 387 days ago

A guy showed me how you can lay the soft skin of your
forearm against a piece of skip planed lumber. If it
feels chilly, it’s not dry enough for furniture.

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