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What bit would I use to create this edge?

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Forum topic by skeemer posted 492 days ago 971 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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skeemer

94 posts in 965 days


492 days ago

I’m trying to make an edge like the one on top. It looks like it is part of a large radius curve (maybe 3-4”?) but the largest radius bit I’m coming across is 3/4” which seems to bee too sharp of a curve. Any help is appreciated!

FWIW the board I will be using will be 1” thick.


14 replies so far

View ShaneA's profile

ShaneA

5256 posts in 1199 days


#1 posted 492 days ago

Just a guess, but it looks like a round over has been used on both top and bottom (3/8”?) then a cove molding beneath it. Hopefully you get additional feedback.

View Wdwerker's profile

Wdwerker

331 posts in 834 days


#2 posted 492 days ago

I have used a portion of a large radius bit, the straighter section of a 1” radius bit set up in a router table might do the trick. You have to run the board twice and turn it over in-between passes.

-- Fine Custom Woodwork since 1978

View SamuraiSaw's profile

SamuraiSaw

439 posts in 565 days


#3 posted 492 days ago

The lower cove is a seperate molding. The edge detail is done with a bull nose bit on either a shaper or router table.

-- Artisan Woodworks of Texas.... www.awwtx.com

View MNgary's profile

MNgary

235 posts in 1018 days


#4 posted 492 days ago

I agree with using a bullnose, but am guessing it was oversized. Eg, a one inch or one and a quarter inch shaper cutter on a three quarter inch thick board. Then a cove mold below.

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

View skeemer's profile

skeemer

94 posts in 965 days


#5 posted 492 days ago

View SamuraiSaw's profile

SamuraiSaw

439 posts in 565 days


#6 posted 492 days ago

That is a good choice.

-- Artisan Woodworks of Texas.... www.awwtx.com

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 878 days


#7 posted 492 days ago

Agreed with all that say it is bullnose and a cove molding

Correct me if I am wrong but to create the bullnose profile without buying a new bit and assuming you have a 1/2 roundover and a router table is to:

1.) Set up 1/2 roundover in your router table so just the full roundover portion of the cutter is exposed
2.) Set the fence flush with bearing or bearing slightly behind the fence
3.) Make one pass
4.) Flip top and make a second pass
5.) Maybe light sanding to smooth any minor flat areas to sweeten the bullnose

I suggest a router table with the bearing flush with or slightly behind the fence because hand routing would work with one pass but wouldn’t with the second pass because the bearing wouldn’t have enough surface area to ride on

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10580 posts in 1291 days


#8 posted 492 days ago

I do these like kdc68 suggested. That bullnose bit is pretty pricey unless you plan on doing these often.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 878 days


#9 posted 492 days ago

James101...GOOD EYE…I looked at his link he posted and you are correct

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View skeemer's profile

skeemer

94 posts in 965 days


#10 posted 492 days ago

If I were to go the roundover bit route (pun intended), any suggestions on doing this without a router table? I do have a fence for my PC router, but it will not reach the opposite side of the top I am making. I suppose I could clamp a straightedge to the top and then run the fence against that, as long as I get it carefully squared up.

View SamuraiSaw's profile

SamuraiSaw

439 posts in 565 days


#11 posted 492 days ago

Honestly, I wouldn’t attempt it without a router table. Too difficult to control the router freehand.

What router do you have? Properly set up, the fence on a PC router can be a real benefit.

-- Artisan Woodworks of Texas.... www.awwtx.com

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 878 days


#12 posted 492 days ago

skeemer- agreed with Samurai. Freehanding one side, no problem. But fliping the top over and trying to freehand the other side is the problem. The bearing would ride along the profile and ruin your piece. The fence idea you have sounds good I think (trying to picture it in my mind).
1.) Try it on scrap that is exactly the same thickness of your top (1”).
2.) Rout one side freehand and pencil in a line where your baseplate edge is on the top.
3.) Measure that distance and use it as reference for where to clamp a straight edge on the opposite side.
4.) Clamp a fence to the opposite side (not on but close to the measurement). Sneak up on the cut with multiple passes adjusting the fence as needed until the bullnose profile is symmetrical
5.) Once satisfied measure the new fence location to use on the top
That’s how I can picture it, but in theory. It may not work, but trying it on scrap first is the key

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View GT350's profile

GT350

265 posts in 583 days


#13 posted 492 days ago

I enlarged the photo and it looks like there may be a flat spot in the center. If that is true my guess is this was created with a round over bit with a bearing. If it were me I would just use my router and do one side then flip it over and do the other side. If there isn’t a flat spot for the bearing to ride then the only way I would attempt it would be on the router or shaper table.

Mike

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2494 days


#14 posted 492 days ago

The bull nose bit is how this is done, or two passes on a 1/2 round over. Skip the bearing and use a router table.

The part beneath the bull nosing is done by adding a piece of trim.

I suppose you could use the bearing and then thickness plane the wood to remove the offset but that would be a waste of money and wood

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

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