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220V 10gauge Dryer outlet

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Forum topic by babybuda posted 03-22-2013 08:41 AM 1254 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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babybuda

7 posts in 778 days


03-22-2013 08:41 AM

After reading through LJs many excellent comments, suggestions & reviews regarding 220V current, required gauges of wire & connecting of power tools of all shapes, makes & sizes – I have found that my situation leaves a few questions unanswered. I know you L-jocks will pull through for me with some good feedback.

Recently I’ve purchased a dedicated 220V DC with 2HP TEFC motor running 12A full load with a recommended 20A circuit and wired with what appears to be 14gauge?? from the motor to a dinky 220 plug.

My workshop is a small sunroom facing south with alot of sliding glass doors – great for lighting & sunshine. However being originally built as a sunroom it comes equipped with only very limited 110V outlets. Adjacent to the shop is our laundry room with the electric dryer and its dedicated 220V. My first thought is to purchase a dryer type plug to match the 220V wall outlet – which is 10 gauge & on a 30A circuit – and plug the other end with a more conventional 220 F-plug and make like an extension cord. Then rewire the electric motor with 12 gauge and plug the end with a M-conventional 220. The dryer & the DC will not be running at the same time – this goes without saying! Switching the dryers wall circuit to a 20A is not an option either – this requires no further explanation, as the wife has at least some say in this.

So my first question is – Is it safe practice to plug a 12 gauge cord rated for 20A into a 10 gauge cord rated at 30A? Oh, and at the same time, not burn the motor out or fry my laundry room.

My second thought to approach this scenario is with the multiple 110V outlets in our laundry room – take one of the duplex outlets and convert it to a 20A 220V dedicated outlet for the DC.

I have good handyman status, but have limited electrical wiring experience. I am an Audio-Video Tech by trade so am very familiar with cables, wiring, connectors etc.

Any thoughts & suggestions are much appreciated. Steve


12 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

2057 posts in 1247 days


#1 posted 03-22-2013 11:58 AM

I wouldn’t bother changing the wire, the one on the DC is plenty for the current it pulls (remember this is 240v, so the amps on each leg is 1/2 of the total). It is plenty safe to run the DC on the 30 amp circuit, and you can do what you want with the extension….but my choice would be to install a 240V/20A circuit dedicated to the DC. You find the switching between the dryer and dc to get old after a while.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3703 posts in 761 days


#2 posted 03-22-2013 12:27 PM

I did something similar back when we lived in GA. In my garage I had a 220v stick welder and a 220v air compressor. I only had room in my electrical box for one 220v outlet and I since used the welder about once a month, I added a 2nd box & outlet with an A-B switch in-line between the outlets. When I needed to use the welder I simply threw the switch to the “B” side, otherwise I left it on the “A” side for the compressor. Which ever side of the switch was chosen was the “live” side, the other side went dead when the switch was thrown.

I’m not an electrician so I must confess that I had one of the electricians at the manufacturing plant I worked at figure out how to wire the switch. Took him all of 10 minutes to wire it up once I had everything installed the way he told me to. He even “donated” the parts I needed from his supplies at work :-)

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View twelvepoint's profile

twelvepoint

38 posts in 717 days


#3 posted 03-22-2013 12:31 PM

May I piggyback onto this thread?

I’m installing a Clear Vue 1800 and I have a 240v 30A receptacle, along with a corresponding plug (that goes directly to the motor). Specifically I’m using the “L6-30” type.

I have 2 questions:

First is: what kind of junction box would be good for the receptacle? I noticed with a single-gang, it’s very tight, and I wonder if it’s even legal, or I should use something larger. Is plastic ok for this, or does it need to be metal?

Second: what’s a good source for a flexible jacket wire to make a cord for the motor to the plug? I could probably use a clothes dryer cable, but they’re $20 and I was wondering if there’s something cheaper.

Thanks, and I hope this wasn’t too far off-topic.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1774 posts in 1383 days


#4 posted 03-22-2013 01:57 PM

Is it safe practice to plug a 12 gauge cord rated for 20A into a 10 gauge cord rated at 30A?

yes, provided the 30A circuitis th eline (supplying electricity) and the 12 gauge is on the load (using electricity). having 30A available for use by your DC is fine. the other way around could be a problem.

take one of the duplex outlets and convert it to a 20A 220V dedicated outlet for the DC.

that’s what i did in my shop. worked perfectly. as has been noted, plugging and unplugging will get old in a hurry. but is that 12A draw by your new DC it’s 110v or it’s 220v rating? 12A for a 2 hp motor @ 220v seems a little high.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View toolie's profile

toolie

1774 posts in 1383 days


#5 posted 03-22-2013 02:02 PM

with a single-gang, it’s very tight, and I wonder if it’s even legal, or I should use something larger.

use a double gang. more room usually isn’t problem. insufficient room can be a problem.

Is plastic ok for this, or does it need to be metal?

plastic is acceptable in my municipality and generally under the national code. but i’d check with the municipality having jurisdiction in your area.

what’s a good source for a flexible jacket wire to make a cord for the motor to the plug?

i’ve always used SJ cord from the BORG.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1288 posts in 1051 days


#6 posted 03-22-2013 02:15 PM

If you have a 20 amp outlet by itself on a circuit served with 12 gauge wire I would go ahead and change out the breaker to the double pole and change the receptacle – that seems like the easiest and cheapest way to do what you need. Just be sure no other fixtures or outlets are on that circuit. All you are doing is moving the neutral leg to one leg of the new double pole breaker making it hot, and making sure the ground wire is attached to the ground bar – NOT the neutral bus bar. I don’t think adding a switch to redirect power is kosher as far as national code is concerned. Do it once and do it right.

View babybuda's profile

babybuda

7 posts in 778 days


#7 posted 03-22-2013 02:34 PM

Great responses here – probably ‘cause it’s what I wanted to hear! The DC is only new to me and like I mentioned is a dedicated 220V. The unit is about a year old – the guy went out & upgraded to a cyclone unit. After speaking with the ‘big bear’ tech support people they did concur with Fred that the 14gauge wire is adequate for the 12A full load draw. The 10gauge 30A is the dryer side of things.

I appreciate the feedback about the switching between dryer & dc getting old after awhile, but isn’t it funny how in the beginning you figure it’s not going to be such a big deal?

In my lucky find, the guy included a 1 micron canister filter, alot of Oak 3/4in plywood used to construct a stand, a very nice set of swivel locking wheels, some reducers & tubing. After seeing his garage & set up, the guy spares no expense on his tools & equipment.

View twelvepoint's profile

twelvepoint

38 posts in 717 days


#8 posted 03-22-2013 05:48 PM

Thanks toolie!

I also didn’t know what BORG stood for until today, too! Great term.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1288 posts in 1051 days


#9 posted 03-22-2013 06:06 PM

Yes, 14/2 with ground (essentially what you are making) is adequate for a 12 amp load, but I would NOT use a 20 amp breaker with 14 gauge wire – 14 is for lighting, 12 is for a 20 amp outlet/breaker. If that’s the wire you have put a 15 amp double pole breaker in. You may trip it repeatedly when the motor starts up however. Only one way to find out.

View verdesardog's profile

verdesardog

105 posts in 1365 days


#10 posted 03-22-2013 09:25 PM

#14 wire…only use a 15 amp breaker. 20 amps requires #12 wire

-- .. heyoka ..

View darthford's profile

darthford

532 posts in 678 days


#11 posted 03-23-2013 12:32 AM

What verdesardog said, #14 wire on a 20amp breaker is a bad idea.

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1288 posts in 1051 days


#12 posted 03-23-2013 10:05 PM

Uh, yeah – I didn’t say that.

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