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Forum topic by NGK posted 03-19-2013 10:31 AM 1582 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NGK

93 posts in 597 days


03-19-2013 10:31 AM

I recently read an article about various woodturning finishes. The author or poster mentioned one I had never heard of, let alone have an opportunity to try. It’s CRYSTAL CLEAR PASTE WAX manufactured by H. F Staples & Co. in Merrimack, New Hampshire. Allegedly it contains carnauba wax which is supposed to be the hardest was in the world. Carnauba is the third and final step in the Beale Buffing System.

The author stated he had compared it to Liberon, Renaissance, and BriWax and found Staples Crystal Clear to be superior to those three. Are there any users out there on this site who might shed light on this subject?


12 replies so far

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Cliff De Witt

129 posts in 1379 days


#1 posted 03-19-2013 12:15 PM

A quick Google search gave 500+ replies.

It seems to be available all over. their label looks familiar, but I have never use it.

-- Trying to find an answer to my son’s question: “…and forming organic cellulose by spinning it on its axis is interesting, why?”

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Kreegan

1452 posts in 833 days


#2 posted 03-19-2013 12:32 PM

One of my favorite Youtube turners, Carl Jacobson, use a mix of that paste wax with a little mineral oil to finish almost everything he turns. Check him out.

http://www.youtube.com/user/haydenHD?feature=g-user-u

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Wildwood

1093 posts in 821 days


#3 posted 03-19-2013 05:31 PM

If apply wax over a film finish usually use Johnsons or Minwax paste wax. Also been told neutral shoe polish wax as good as those you mentioned but have not tried it.

Wax is a decoration not really a finish to me.
.

-- Bill

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Jack Gaskins

42 posts in 1700 days


#4 posted 03-20-2013 11:50 AM

Well, only one way to find out if it is any good or not. Try it out and let us know.

-- USAF Ret. 2006

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gtbuzz

362 posts in 1128 days


#5 posted 03-20-2013 01:22 PM

I’ve tried it before and I don’t really like the paste wax alone, but when you add some oil like Carl Jacobson suggests, it gives a nice balance of shininess and a natural look. It’s a very easy finish to apply so I do tend to use it a bit.

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Kenbu

19 posts in 567 days


#6 posted 04-02-2013 08:03 PM

Carl Jacobson has a lot of very informative videos. Here is the one where he talks specifically about his mineral oil/wax mix, which he uses for reducing airborne dust while sanding: http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=LRqmdOYsXXI

Ken

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Ripthorn

768 posts in 1671 days


#7 posted 04-02-2013 08:06 PM

I use the crystal clear wax, but haven’t put it on turnings yet. I like it a lot, though it can be a lot of work to buff out because it is quite hard. Enough friction should soften it up enough to buff, though. I got mine from craft supplies usa a few years ago.

-- Brian T. - Exact science is not an exact science

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NGK

93 posts in 597 days


#8 posted 04-02-2013 09:19 PM

Yes, I enjoy Carl Jacobsen…..He has a can of Crystal Clear Wax sitting on the shelf behind in the video where he primarily shows his shop. I purchased mine online from one of those universally popular sales places. $7 plus per can. So It got one for a friend, too and we split the shipping to make it $12 per can. By contrast BriWax locally in stores is $15 pus tax.

One of the “magic” ingredients in Crystal Clear is Carnauba wax, allegedly the hardest wax in the world—from some South American plant. One guy in our club says carnauba is also in Kiwi Shoe Polish.

I also like Allan Stratton, who comes out with a video every couple of weeks. By the way, carnauba is the third of three stick in the Beall Buffin System which is very good and very popular with our club guys. We’re Lincoln Land WoodTurners out of central ILLINOIS, Springfield, in case any reader here is close enough to join. Other clubs operate out of Decatur, IL, Bloomington, IL, and the St. Louis area, in case anyone is close enough to consider joining. LLW membership is $25 per year plus membership in AAW around $50 for insurance purposes, but then you get an excellent magazine 6 times per year included.

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TheDane

3857 posts in 2349 days


#9 posted 04-02-2013 11:01 PM

You can actually buy the Staples wax through Carl Jacobson’s website … http://thewoodshop.tv/ ... you get a good product at a fair price and support a first-rate guy all at the same time!

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Rick M.

4123 posts in 1066 days


#10 posted 04-05-2013 05:03 AM

You can buy raw carnauba wax cheaper and just mix it with mineral oil.

-- |Statistics show that 100% of people bitten by a snake were close to it.|

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twd42

2 posts in 9 days


#11 posted 10-12-2014 06:30 AM

NGK I was going to send you a message to get more information about the Bloomington Lincoln Land WoodTurners, as I am in Bloomington, but am unable to do so until I make 5 posts. Would you mind sending me a private message? Thanks. I’m also looking for someone who knows how to apply veneer to a table I am working on. I think I burned through the original veneer when I was sanding and could use some help.

Thanks,

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twd42

2 posts in 9 days


#12 posted 10-12-2014 06:30 AM

Maybe someone else could send a message to him for me just in case he does not see my post.

Thanks,

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