LumberJocks

Entry Doors Panel Question

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by GuitDave posted 397 days ago 623 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View GuitDave's profile

GuitDave

6 posts in 441 days


397 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: entry carriage doors panels

Hi, so I’m new to woodworking and new to this forum. I’ve read posts for several years now just have never posted anything. So I have a question. I’m building some doors for my shop that are about 4ft x 7ft each made from African Mahogany. I’ve got the frames done (not glued together) and wondering how the tongue and groove panel is detailed. A company sent me their details and I guess I just don’t understand. I imagine the panels float in the bottom half of the door but what is this “continuous spline glued top and bottom” talk? What is that and what does it do? I’ve seen Norm do something like it when he built his doors but this is a little different. Can the panels not slide into the top just like it does on the sides? Maybe its for rain? Can someone explain to me whats going on? Thanks! Any tips would help – I’m sweating over the window muntins, too.

Here’s what Im sort of imitating:

Here’s the detail:

Here’s my frame (tongue & groove panels on bottom, windows on top):


8 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile (online now)

pintodeluxe

3030 posts in 1314 days


#1 posted 397 days ago

I have used foam weatherstripping on an exterior door, and it works well. The same concepts apply with doors as any floating panel, you need to let the panel move. I glue the panel top and bottom, but only at the center of the door. This lets expansion and contraction happen, but keeps the panel centered in the frame. You could glue one board centrally, and let the others float.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View GuitDave's profile

GuitDave

6 posts in 441 days


#2 posted 397 days ago

Hey thats a good idea, Willie and I will do that. But what about expansion in the up/down direction? As you can see in the detail, there is a 3/4”WD x 1/2”DP slot the panel sits in on the sides – but what happens at top/bottom? Do you recess the panels in the same manner or do they butt up against the rails attached by a spline? I see two problems with that: 1) it wouldn’t allow movement in that direction and 2) you would potentially see a gap if the two don’t butt perfectly. Im just having trouble picturing how that works. And I feel like if you just cut a slot in the bottom rail and recessed the panels in there, water would seep in. So maybe a spline at bottom rail and recessed in the middle rails…

Thanks for your comment

-Dave

View teejk's profile

teejk

1186 posts in 1185 days


#3 posted 397 days ago

I don’t think wood expands/contracts much lengthwise (proof is that your common 2×4 does not get appreciably longer/shorter. The continuous spline appears to be akin to a biscuit that keeps the panel in line with the top and bottom. My guess is there is no glue on the panel to frame. The foam is to stop rattling I think (some cabinet makers use something called “space balls”).

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1073 posts in 1331 days


#4 posted 397 days ago

I assume they are showing glueing the spline into the rails. Then cutting a slot/dado into the top & bottom of the T&G paneling allowing the panels to move freely on the spline. Basically a long loose tenon, but only glued on one side.
Is your frame dry fitted or already glued?

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View teejk's profile

teejk

1186 posts in 1185 days


#5 posted 397 days ago

Gary…I think the design is to mount the panels into grooves in the stiles (no glue but a compressible material to allow for the side to side expansion/contraction). Tops and bottoms sounds like only the spline. Not so sure that is needed on the top but anybody in a freeze/thaw climate that has have ever had a wood garage door of stile/rail construction will be able to attest to the rot on the bottom rail. Caulk works for a while but sooner or later you are going to have a water pocket in the rail. With the spline you keep the rails solid and water should shed off. It all makes sense to me.

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1073 posts in 1331 days


#6 posted 396 days ago

teejk…we’re on the same line of thought. The top could be a spline or setting the panels into a groove.

”With the spline you keep the rails solid and water should shed off. It all makes sense to me.”

This is what I was thinking with the spline glued in with a waterproof glue it would shed the water out. Putting a chamfer on the rail would also help in keeping water out.


-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View GuitDave's profile

GuitDave

6 posts in 441 days


#7 posted 396 days ago

Thanks I really appreciate the advice. I understand now. I haven’t glued anything together yet. I think I am going to spline the bottom and recesses the top – and a chamfer at the bottom rail is a good idea, too. Thanks!

View MNgary's profile

MNgary

231 posts in 917 days


#8 posted 396 days ago

I agree with GaryL

-- I dream of the world where a duck can cross the road and no one asks why.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase