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2 Questions for Experienced Dye Users

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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 03-14-2013 05:39 PM 450 views 0 times favorited 4 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1604 days


03-14-2013 05:39 PM

The project: Embellishing a dilapidated oak library chair, specifically the seat. It is glued up, probably white oak.

The dye: Lockwood’s ebony, water.

The question: How long do I wait before either spray (rattle can) lacquer or poly? Function is not the issue, time is. I am free to use either.

And, in general, have you ever wetsanded with dye? Just curious on this one.

Thanks kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


4 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

2054 posts in 1247 days


#1 posted 03-14-2013 05:45 PM

All you are waiting for is the water to evaporate, at that point it’s dry. So you can usually start yor top cpats fairly quickly. I usually put on one or two coats of the topcoat and then sand the “whiskers” (from the raised grain). This allows the finish to lock them in, and one sanding and your done with the raised grain problem. I’ve never wet sanded with dye, can’t think of a reason I would do so…not to say there isn’t one, it’s just one I haven’t encountered.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1115 days


#2 posted 03-15-2013 09:00 PM

Because I pre-wet with plain water before staining, I usually wait overnight to allow for complete drying. Then rub down with maroon scotchbrite before the first coat of lacquer, followed by another rub down if there’s any grain raised. Then it’s a s many coats as necessary to get the build I’m happy with, completing with a rubbing out with 0000 steel wool lubed with Butcher’s or Johnson paste wax, and a rag polishing.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1604 days


#3 posted 03-15-2013 10:12 PM

Thanks for the help. You can see the results of the dyed chair seat here.

I put a fan on the piece to dry it and started the lacquer about 30 minutes after dyeing. Worked beautifully. 4 coats of lacquer and it was done.

Kindly,

Lee

Clint, you said “staining” and I wonder if you mean dyeing as well as staining?

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1479 posts in 1115 days


#4 posted 03-15-2013 11:50 PM

Lee, I was referring to water soluble dye stain.

-- Clint Searl....Ya can no more do what ya don't know how than ya can git back from where ya ain't been

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