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Slipping rollers on DeWalt 13" planer

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Forum topic by Elizabeth posted 03-13-2013 09:03 PM 5054 views 1 time favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


03-13-2013 09:03 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question planer slipping rollers

Recently, after a long period of not being used (nearly a year?) I had occasion to use my planer and I encountered difficulties. The rollers seemed to not be grabbing the wood properly, and the board would stop partway through the planer, several times. I had to push it to keep it going. When the board came out, I would find black lines on it (across the grain) that appeared to coincide with the number and frequency of grab-failures. These lines appeared to be rubber marks from the planer rollers – they would sand out.

I cranked the planer all the way up and found some small wood shavings and dust adhered to the rollers, so I carefully got a clean cloth in there and rubbed them clean. The next few passes were fine…then it happened again. This time I lived with it as I was partway through a delicate procedure and didn’t want to crank the machine all the way up again, and then have trouble finding the spot I was at previously.

What can I do to stop this from happening? Does it happen often to others? It’s not a particularly old planer – I got it in 2011 I think – and I have used it fairly heavily in the past without any problems. Is it because my shop has been a little on the cold side lately? (40-50 degrees f, I turn on some electric heat when I go in but I don’t take it much past 60) I have waxed the bed in the past but I don’t think I’ve done it recently.


29 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#1 posted 03-13-2013 09:08 PM

Dull blades is the most common culprit. After a new set of blades, try waxing the tables and planer bed with silicone-free wax. It helps a great deal.
Getting new blades on is the main thing. The rollers are good, but they will have trouble pushing lumber into dull blades. In my own experience, I don’t have to clean the rollers very often.
Good luck!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View lew's profile

lew

11335 posts in 3216 days


#2 posted 03-13-2013 09:11 PM

+1 for waxing the planer bed. Works for me every time. I use Johnson’s paste furniture wax.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#3 posted 03-13-2013 09:11 PM

Ah, hm. Yeah, it’s still the same set of blades. Guess it’s time for me to learn how to change them. I think I read that the DW blades are not sharpenable but are double sided and can be flipped over (once, obviously) for a new set – is that right?

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pintodeluxe

4853 posts in 2274 days


#4 posted 03-13-2013 09:13 PM

Yes, that is correct. It is an easy 10 minute job with the included allen wrench.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View lew's profile

lew

11335 posts in 3216 days


#5 posted 03-13-2013 09:13 PM

Yes, you can flip them. I would also get a tube of anti-seize. Put a little on the threads of each screw when you put them back in. It will help prevent the blade screws from seizing in the head.

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11806 posts in 3148 days


#6 posted 03-13-2013 09:14 PM

Depends on which model you’re referring too : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Mark Davisson's profile

Mark Davisson

597 posts in 2778 days


#7 posted 03-13-2013 09:14 PM

Elizabeth, don’t discount the impact cold rollers will have. I bet if your shop was kept at 70 degrees your experience would be different.

-- I'm selfless because it feels so good!

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1533 days


#8 posted 03-13-2013 09:43 PM

+1 on waxing the bed. Lots of experience with this loud puppy. If you don’t keep that bed slick, the rollers will slip. I have also had this happen with pitchy woods, as the oils and such build up while opening new pores. The friction from dull blades can contribute, but more likely the bed, especially after that long storage. BTW you will technically be spinning, not flipping the blades.:)

-- Who is John Galt?

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#9 posted 03-13-2013 09:46 PM

Thanks all, lots of ideas to try here. I’ll try the wax and the heat first, since the blades still give a very smooth finish so maybe they’re not that dull yet.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1533 days


#10 posted 03-13-2013 09:54 PM

Another thing came to mind. on one of my older 735’s the thickness of cut indicator got off. I rely on that so much I didn’t realize I was taking 1/8 when I thought i was taking 1/32 I got a lot of slippage on that one. Just to cover all the bases.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Craftsman on the lake's profile

Craftsman on the lake

2521 posts in 2898 days


#11 posted 03-13-2013 10:09 PM

My vote for dull blades. My dewalt 734 was still cutting smoothly but started to not pull the wood through. And you noticed that when it does that it leaves burn marks in the place it stops. I removed the blades and spun turned them to the good side (a tedious with all the screws but easy job) After that the wood went through like the day I bought it. 10 to 1 it’s the blades.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#12 posted 03-13-2013 10:10 PM

Hm, that’s interesting Joey – what did you do about it, anything?

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1294 posts in 1533 days


#13 posted 03-13-2013 10:30 PM

No, I never diagnosed how the gauge got off or how long it had been that way. That was number one of three 735’s I have run. It had close to 1,000,000 board feet on it, and was quite old. Had been maintained and had only routine repairs. Shortly after I discovered the problem I broke the shaft on the in feed roller (maybe from the stress of taking waaaaay too big of cuts for I don’t know how long) My time being worth what it is, I decided it was too close to a wash on opportunity cost, so I had the service center do a max repair on it ($280 here in texas) basically it is a rebuilt machine now so I may not know what happened (or which of my workers is responsible) The whole gauge system is all steel parts and such, so I imagine one of the apprentices wedges a board in there and bent it. The other two are still in service and working great. So I don’t have any info on tuning it or a repairing the gauge, but I will mention that I am a fan of this machine, and would be happy to answer any other questions you have on it. BTW you also have the option of sliding each blade left or right. i start mine all to the left, with the little triangle shaped arrow the factory puts on the blade pointing left, so I know if I have slid or spun the blade. If you get a small nick just slide one blade over, You can do this three times before you have to “spin” the blades, and can do it three more times before you have to buy new blades.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Elizabeth's profile

Elizabeth

814 posts in 2604 days


#14 posted 03-13-2013 10:41 PM

That’s a useful tip, Joey, thanks. I do have a nick in the blades so I may try that in the interim!

View sixstring's profile

sixstring

296 posts in 1704 days


#15 posted 03-13-2013 10:42 PM

I’ve got the same problem right now with a less than 1 yr old 735. I’ve put through about 500 feet of reclaimed douglas fir and there was a noticeable amount of pitch from many of the boards. I’ve also run 50feet of hardwood which had an oak veneer and some crazy thick poly or something on top. Instead of stripping or sanding, I just went for it with the planer thinking my blades were going dull anyway so I may as well take it all the way.

Now I’m at point where I have to push through just about everything and it seems noisier. Time to change the blades… waxing the bed sounds like a good idea too. Have you seen all the screws on each blade? Intimidating but they actually come off pretty easily. Just dont lose the screws!!!

Good luck to both of us.

-- JC Garcia, Concord, CA : "It's easier to ask forgiveness than permission..."

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