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Need help with re-sawing

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Forum topic by Mark posted 03-12-2013 08:04 PM 728 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mark

486 posts in 718 days


03-12-2013 08:04 PM

I’m the proud owner of a new Rikon 10-325 band saw. I’ll post a review when I’ve got a few miles on it. In the mean time I’m having grief with the re-sawing. I’m using the stock blade ( I did get a new 1/2” 3TPI Viking/Timber Wolf blade) and the stock guides. My last 2 cuts are the best yet. I’m feeding quite slow, tight to the fence but I still get the wave action. The pics aren’t the best but I hope you get the idea.

The first pic is probably the best. The piece at the bottom was not bad for the first 2”, then it started to wave. I’m using 1×2 1/2” Maple. I tried to set up the saw as per the Alex Snodgrass You tube Video. I realize the stock blade isn’t the best, but I was hoping to get some practice in with it before I installed the new one. Any thoughts would be more than welcome. Thanks

-- Mark


12 replies so far

View crank49's profile

crank49

3506 posts in 1715 days


#1 posted 03-12-2013 08:31 PM

I’m not an expert by any stretch of the imagination, but I wouldn’t be critiquing the performance of a process when I was not using the correct tool for the process. In this case, evaluating re-saw without using a re-saw specific blade.

From everything I have read, and my own limited experience tells me what you are getting is what you should expect from a stock standard blade. That’s why manufacturers determined the need to design re-saw specific blades.

I think maple will dull the blade rather quickly as well. I would practice on something like poplar.

-- Michael :-{| “If you tell a big enough lie and tell it frequently enough, it will be believed.” ― A H

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1696 days


#2 posted 03-12-2013 10:30 PM

Mark, get rid of the stock blade. Put the new blade on and give it a try. The stock blade has too many teeth and can’t carry away the waste fast enough which will cause the blade to drift side to side. The 3 t.p.i. blade won’t have that problem.

I just purchased a Craftsman model which is the knock-off of the 10-325 built by Rikon for Craftsman. As soon as I got it put together, the stock blade came off and a new 3 t.p.i. blade went on. Never even made a cut on the stock one. It resaws very nicely.

Good Luck!

-- Mike

View Mark's profile

Mark

486 posts in 718 days


#3 posted 03-13-2013 07:50 PM

The saw came with a 5/8 X 5 TPI. I trashed it this A.M. and installed the Viking. What a difference. I tensioned it as per the blade package instructions ( the flutter method ). The cuts came out not to bad at all. Still a wee bit of wave, but I think that will improve with practice.

-- Mark

View LeChuck's profile

LeChuck

419 posts in 1806 days


#4 posted 03-13-2013 08:14 PM

I had terrible waving with the stock blade on the same bandsaw, not just when resawing but also ripping thick stock. I replaced it with a 3/8 3tpi blade and my cuts are (very) straight with no wave, a lot easier, and also quite a bit smoother despite the lower tpi count. So the stock blade is junk. This is my third bandsaw. The previous ones were a Craftsman, and a clone of a Laguna LTE16. I remember the stock blades on those being much better.

-- David - Tucson, AZ

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3549 posts in 1557 days


#5 posted 03-13-2013 08:23 PM

A 3 tpi hook or skip tooth blade should work just fine. Like you mentioned, a slow feed rate is critical. I use magnetic featherboards to hold the work tight to the fence. Set a fair amount of tension on your blade, and make sure the guide blocks (or guide rollers) are set correctly above and below the fence.
Lower the blade guide assembly as low as you can, while still clearing the workpiece. As long as the workpiece has uniform thickness, you are doing great.
Don’t expect a glass smooth cut with a bandsaw. As long as my thickness is within 1/16” or so, I don’t worry too much. It will always need to be run through the planer after bandsawing.
Good luck with the new toy!

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

811 posts in 854 days


#6 posted 03-13-2013 08:25 PM

A steady feed rate will improve the cut. Even with a Timber Wolf .75” blade I still have to sand about 1/64th off after resaw.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View Mark's profile

Mark

486 posts in 718 days


#7 posted 03-14-2013 02:50 PM

Thanks for the tips gents. I guess if ya don’t have a planer yer in for a wee bot of sanding, or is there a more gooder idea?

-- Mark

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#8 posted 03-14-2013 03:02 PM

The first thing you do with a new band saw is cuss the stock blade while tossing it.

I use a shop made band saw. I am running the Wood Slicer resaw blades from highland wood working. I resaw material usually a quarter inch thick for my scroll working. While I do sometimes run the resawed material through the planer just to speed things up, it comes off good enough that you could very well have it ready to use quickly with a sander.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Mark's profile

Mark

486 posts in 718 days


#9 posted 03-14-2013 07:45 PM

William. I went to your site. Absolutely killer. Ya make me feel bad for buying a saw. What size of motor are you running? I was at Wandel”s web site along time back (like last year) and I thought that was a very cool project. But like so many others I never took the next step. Well done.

-- Mark

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3549 posts in 1557 days


#10 posted 03-14-2013 07:48 PM

Hand plane, then sand if you don’t have a planer.
That would get old very quickly I’m afraid.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#11 posted 03-14-2013 10:35 PM

Mark, actually I now have two of those saws. I built another so I could have one for resawing and another for scrolling type work without having to change blades. Blade changes aren’y too difficult on them, but I’m kind of lazy on that sort of thing.
The one I use for scroll type work has a 1/2 HP motor on it. I have used it though to cut eight inch thick material in curves while preparing bowl blanks for my lathe.
The other one, the one with the resaw blade on it, I have a 1 1/2 HP motor on it. This is really more than I actually need, but I just happened to have one, so I put it on it. It will resaw wood up to 11 1/2”, and I have done the maximum on it on more than one occasion. With the 1 1/2 HP motor, it never even bogs down no matter how fast you go. This is good and bad at the same time. Because of that, you may think you can go faster. However you have to remember to cut slow because cutting too fast leaves a rougher finish.
I think a nice compromise would be about a three quarter horse motor. That would give enough power for thick wood, but would not tempt you to try resawing at too fast a rate.

By the way, if you ever do decide to build it, it is my opinion that the one I’ve built does a better all around job than anything I could possibly buy. A comparable saw with it’s capacity and features would run over a thousand if bought new. I have about $100 in mine.
It was sort of intimidating when I began building it. Once I got started though, it was not a hard project at all. It was time consuming though. The only issue I had while building it was with the wheels, and that was my fault. You see, a buddy and I who were building these together had this bright idea that we could improve even further on Matthius’s design. If we had stuck to his original design to start with, we would have had no issues what so ever.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View William's profile

William

9263 posts in 1586 days


#12 posted 03-14-2013 10:38 PM

If you would like to read it, there is a seven part blog on the build up of the band saw. You can start with the first entry here.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

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