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Saw dust logs

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Forum topic by David Dean posted 03-11-2013 10:27 AM 1989 views 1 time favorited 26 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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David Dean

524 posts in 1566 days


03-11-2013 10:27 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I was just wonding I plan a lot of oak and there is aways lots of saw dust so is there a way to trun it in to logs than throw it away?


26 replies so far

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4338 posts in 1715 days


#1 posted 03-11-2013 10:37 AM

Did you hear about Eco brick? http://ecobrick.net/
I use it in my wood stove when I run out of scrap.
This is what it is ,compressed wood chips and saw dust.
The process is German, but I am not sure , except for using a press, how it is made.
I do not know if they add an additive to keep the whole thing “glued” together.
The place where I buy mine, is a mill where they make all kind of molding out of oak only.
Their price went up about 20% in one year, the told me that they cannot keep up with the demand

-- Bert

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 665 days


#2 posted 03-11-2013 11:16 AM

I have no trouble getting rid of sawdust and shavings. It makes great bedding for farm animals and we live in a rural area. Bagged shavings at the farm supply are around $5/bag I see folks on craigs list selling contractor bags of shop shavings for from 3-5 dollars. I give mine to a friend who has a collection of various livestock and he gives me fresh eggs. Much simpler than making sawdust logs.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

View pendledad's profile

pendledad

189 posts in 757 days


#3 posted 03-11-2013 12:51 PM

Work up a deal like sprucegum. Trading by products of our hobby for tangible goods is an awesome idea.

Those envi bricks and eco bricks aren’t possible without a 50 ton press and a mold. They compress the sawdust under so much pressure that the wood fibers actually regrip themselves and hold the log shape…. crazy.

View camps764's profile

camps764

796 posts in 1027 days


#4 posted 03-11-2013 12:53 PM

I think Spruce Gum just solved my problem as well!

FYI – I have heard through the grapevine that Walnut shavings are bad for animal bedding – particularly horses. Something about it making them go lame. Not sure how much truth there is to it or not – since I don’t own horses. But something to consider I suppose.

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

View IrreverentJack's profile

IrreverentJack

724 posts in 1510 days


#5 posted 03-11-2013 01:04 PM

Making bricks or even pellets out of “waste” (saw dust, leaves, grass, paper etc.) to heat your house interests me too. The problem, aside from a lack of objective info, is the cost in equipment and energy to produce them. If you search Youtube you’ll find all kinds of pellet or briquette makers for sale as well as homemade contraptions of varying practicality. This kind of stove might be the easiest to use. You could burn saw dust as well as scrap and fire wood. Matthias Wandel’s Woodgears.com had good article on a sawdust/heat solution. -Jack

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4138 posts in 1619 days


#6 posted 03-11-2013 01:09 PM

Steve, I’d just be sure to clearly disclose whether your shavings/dust include walnut.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View camps764's profile

camps764

796 posts in 1027 days


#7 posted 03-11-2013 01:11 PM

Definitely a good idea.

I think…if I remember right…which i probably don’t…but walnut saw dust also works as a herbicide.

-- Steve. Visit my website http://www.campbellwoodworking.com

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 665 days


#8 posted 03-11-2013 01:32 PM

I don’t worry too much about my shavings being toxic as most of the wood I use is wood that is milled local and those mills are selling sawdust as bedding also. If there were a problem I think I would have heard about it by now, walnut does not grow here I have used a little for gunstocks but that does not make a very big pile.
One word of caution be sure to compost sawdust before you use it on your garden because the process of the wood decaying will tie up most of the nitrogen in the soil and your plants will be yellow and sickly looking.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

View IrreverentJack's profile

IrreverentJack

724 posts in 1510 days


#9 posted 03-11-2013 01:43 PM

Walnuts, walnut roots, leaves and sawdust contain a substance called juglone. which is used as an herbicide. For a few years I produced $100 tomatoes until I discovered this. Some people are allergic to walnut saw dust some aren’t. If you are sensitive, it can be very serious. I suspect it’s the same with horses. Some owners say stepping on walnut sawdust will poison a horse, some say their horse eats walnut leaves with no problems. Everyone agrees it would really suck to give your sawdust away and have it kill a horse. -Jack

View David Dean's profile

David Dean

524 posts in 1566 days


#10 posted 03-11-2013 08:23 PM

Well all my saw dust is oak striaght from the sawmill no walnut here. I was thanking 4” steel pipe water and hyd jack and keep presser on it I got time.

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 665 days


#11 posted 03-11-2013 11:01 PM

Let us know if it works.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

970 posts in 692 days


#12 posted 03-12-2013 06:40 PM

I sometimes just stuff sawdust into an ordinary paper bag, and feed an already existing fire with it in my trash burner. Seems to burn fine, and even though the bag burns away, it keeps its shape pretty well and doesn’t collapse and smother the fire.

View rustynails's profile

rustynails

463 posts in 1196 days


#13 posted 03-12-2013 11:57 PM

I wonder if somthing like this would work if you put paper on the out side and saw dust on the inside?

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iv26VAWTsiE

Let me know if it works..

Richard

View SebringDon's profile

SebringDon

95 posts in 607 days


#14 posted 03-13-2013 12:05 AM

Mine goes straight into the compost pile. It really seems to help keep the leaves churning. No walnut, though.

-- Don

View AandCstyle's profile

AandCstyle

1337 posts in 924 days


#15 posted 03-13-2013 12:11 AM

According to Wikipedia:

“The roots, nut husks, and leaves secrete a substance into the soil called juglone that is a respiratory inhibitor to some plants. A number of other plants (most notably white birch) are also poisoned by juglone, and should not be planted in close proximity to a black walnut. The plant can cause contact dermatitis in humans.[19] Horses are susceptible to laminitis from exposure to black walnut wood in bedding.”

Relative to horses, it is more likely to be an issue if they have had their hooves trimmed recently.

-- Art

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