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What is Safest Way? --- 1/2in Roundover Bits on Totes

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Forum topic by HorizontalMike posted 538 days ago 1399 views 0 times favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1549 days


538 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: routing router hand plane tote round-over safety safe

I have started making my own hand plane totes and knobs and am wondering about what other LJs feel is the safest method for routing a 1/2in round-over on a new tote? I am not talking about rounding completely by hand. Even Lee Valley references using a router to do this task of rounding over these complex curves on a tote.

Please feel free include pictures showing your particular method and feel free to explain why and how, etc. to best do this. You know the old adage, ‘A picture is worth a thousand words’... ;-)

Instructions from http://www.leevalley.com/us/html/16j4010k.pdf
”...Final shaping can be done with a combination of
round-over router bits, rasps, carving tools, sandpaper,
etc. Proceed carefully, testing the grip often to ensure
a comfortable handle. Sand the final shape smooth and
finish as desired…”

How can the below image/method be improved upon?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."


41 replies so far

View Jeff in Huntersville's profile

Jeff in Huntersville

399 posts in 1829 days


#1 posted 538 days ago

In the past when I had to rout small items and I felt my fingers were too close to the bit I’d make a jig to hold the piece. Gives you a lot more control too. From your picture I’d say that was too close for my comfort.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1549 days


#2 posted 538 days ago

Thanks Jeff. That is exactly why I ask the question above about safety. I am looking to see what kinds of jigs others may have made for this particular task in making HP totes safer to round over.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View LukieB's profile

LukieB

921 posts in 965 days


#3 posted 538 days ago

Mike, I use a 12” wooden hand screw clamp. I have to loosen it/tighten it 4 times on each one, but it keeps my fingers the hell away from that spinning finger eater….

-- Lucas, "Someday woodworks will be my real job, until then, there's this http://www.melbrownfarmsupply.com"

View shampeon's profile

shampeon

1355 posts in 818 days


#4 posted 538 days ago

Use a clamp. The best are wooden clamps, as they’ve got some mass and sit square to the bit.

-- ian | "You can't stop what's coming. It ain't all waiting on you. That's vanity."

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112020 posts in 2212 days


#5 posted 538 days ago

you can do what Jeff said of just use a wooden screw clamps to hold the tote or buy a small adjustable small part clamp.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Scott's profile

Scott

101 posts in 859 days


#6 posted 538 days ago

Interesting, I cut out a tote the other day, but haven’t rounded it yet. I considered doing it by hand, but the router method seems quicker and more accurate. I think I might try with just a push paddle.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1549 days


#7 posted 538 days ago

Bam! There goes my first ”Gee, I coulda’ had a V8” moment! Great idea, and simple too! Thanks.

BRAINSTORMING: Anyone using a bolted rod through the tote, in any way? Maybe to hold a wedge to square up the top of the tote for the clamp?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Don W's profile

Don W

14899 posts in 1202 days


#8 posted 538 days ago

Mike, I could have sworn I had a picture like a1Jim shows on my blog, but its not there. But to be honest though, I free hand it like you show, and sneak up on the cut.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112020 posts in 2212 days


#9 posted 538 days ago

Kinda slow typing on my first response. You could also just attach a couple sticks with hot glue ,route then remove the sticks, not sure about using a bolt through the tote.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1549 days


#10 posted 538 days ago

Scott, I am thinking that the ‘push stick’ would not be enough. I did a couple totes as posted in the OP and it scared the dickens out of me, and chipped the tote’s toe on the right every time. It sent the tote flying and I was left with my fingers way too close for comfort. This clamp thing is sounding better all the time! That FIRM grip on the tote is the only thing keeping it from flying when it contacts that cutter.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1549 days


#11 posted 538 days ago

Jim,
Hot-gluing the cut-offs back on also sounds like a great idea, as that should help me keep from cutting my right toe off (see above). 8-)

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1549 days


#12 posted 538 days ago

James101, that also sounds doable, but I don’t currently have a trim router to play with. Maybe this would be motivation to save for one. Hmm…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112020 posts in 2212 days


#13 posted 538 days ago

That sound like a winner Mike
I have also used my old PC router and a router mat to do it by hand ,these mats are nothing more than a piece of carpet pad. It has always seemed weird that they hold pieces why you hand route but they work and for the most part they do.
If you can find one of these old routers grab it it’s perfect for round over operations ,the two or three I own cost me less than $20 each.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1549 days


#14 posted 538 days ago

Well, I just ran out to the shop and tried the wooden clamp idea on the Zebrawood tote as seen above. I had to finagle with a couple of the cutoff pieces to wedge it properly and even used the end of the tote rod sticking out, to keep it in place while clamping. Cool! Think I may have had the router turned up a bit high as things wanted to burn rather easily, but other than that I feel A LOT SAFER routing these totes with a clamp.

Jim,
I have rubber mats in my metal-working tool drawers that will probably grab as you indicate. My thoughts are that I probably need to build an equal thickness frame a couple of inches larger than the tote, and that would help me keep the router operating as flat as possible. I think I will practice with some left over Ash, as that Zebrawood and Rosewood is expensive.

I sure appreciate the ideas folks! They helped clear my mind and shake out the cobwebs… ;-) Sometimes the best ideas are the simplest, but you just have to know they exist in order to take advantage of them. Thanks!

Here is how my clamping turned out this morning:

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1964 posts in 911 days


#15 posted 538 days ago

HMike....I found this tip in my vast collection of tips that might work for you. In reference to your comment below. In the tip, instead of double stick tape as suggested, you could use those mats from your drawer.

Jim,
I have rubber mats in my metal-working tool drawers that will probably grab as you indicate. My thoughts are that I probably need to build an equal thickness frame a couple of inches larger than the tote, and that would help me keep the router operating as flat as possible. I think I will practice with some left over Ash, as that Zebrawood and Rosewood is expensive
.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

showing 1 through 15 of 41 replies

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