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Home Made Honing Guide?

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Forum topic by richardwootton posted 03-09-2013 01:54 AM 4995 views 1 time favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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richardwootton

1459 posts in 700 days


03-09-2013 01:54 AM

Has anyone here made a honing guide for plane irons before? I don’t use a debit card due to a lack of self control and there’s no where nearby where I can buy one. Any thoughts?

-- Richard, Hot Springs, Ar -- Galoot In Training


11 replies so far

View Mark Kornell's profile

Mark Kornell

638 posts in 1275 days


#1 posted 03-09-2013 08:05 AM

http://www3.telus.net/BrentBeach/Sharpen/jigarch.html has pics and descriptions of a number of such devices. His entire section on sharpening is interesting reading.

The simple Eclipse-style guide should be available at your local BORG for about $10, and they are quite usable.

If you already have a grinder, you could teach yourself to hollow grind, and then hone on whatever abrasive system you have, no guide required.

-- Mark Kornell, Kornell Wood Design

View pastahill's profile

pastahill

89 posts in 1356 days


#2 posted 03-09-2013 09:58 AM

Try this one. It is working very well, i use it a lot. Webside is in german and english.

-- If anybody find spelling mistakes, can keep them!

View Benvolio's profile

Benvolio

135 posts in 676 days


#3 posted 03-09-2013 12:01 PM

are you looking at getting away from free hand sharpening??

If you’re new to the craft and want to try your hand at sharpening – I’d suggest you just invest the time in learning to freehand. Although it’s intimidating at first, a freehand honing tends to keep its sharp for longer and is quicker to sharpen a blade.

-- Ben, England.

View lwllms's profile

lwllms

548 posts in 2026 days


#4 posted 03-09-2013 02:38 PM

Oh good, Brent Beach’s guide to faceted blunt edges, the most stellar example of why one should avoid honing guides or how insane things can get when one focuses on the bevel. If Brent Beach had learned it’s not really difficult to control the wear bevel on the flat face of plane irons he could have avoided wasting so much time and actually got to quick dependable sharpening. The flat face, though, is the more difficult part of sharpening, the bevel is the easy part. You sure don’t need to tinker around with a honing guide for a couple passes of the bevel over the stones. Sharpening is actually really easy, don’t complicate it with a bunch of unnecessary paraphernalia and tinkering.

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

185 posts in 2713 days


#5 posted 03-10-2013 12:22 PM

Larry

That is incredibly funny … but I really should not reply as it will just encourage you to post more :) :)

(I’ve yet to understand the advantage of multiple secondary bevels).

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

View paratrooper34's profile

paratrooper34

760 posts in 1696 days


#6 posted 03-10-2013 05:12 PM

Richard, I use honing guides all the time to sharpen the blades in my shop. In fact, lots of people do. I don’t have a shop made one as I didn’t know about them until after I purchased one. There are several examples out there of shop made ones and some of them look to be pretty nice tools. Go for it and make your own. Then let us know how it turned out.

-- Mike

View unisaw's profile

unisaw

88 posts in 2878 days


#7 posted 03-10-2013 05:29 PM

Here is an article to FWW that I found to be the best homemade, simple setup I have seen. If you don’t subscribe I will email or PM you a copy. I won’t post the article as I have no rights to it.

http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/article/get-sharp-fast.aspx

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5277 posts in 1322 days


#8 posted 03-10-2013 06:31 PM

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

254 posts in 734 days


#9 posted 01-02-2014 04:54 PM

Multiple secondary bevels reduces the amount of material removal required to smooth the edge to the next grit level, reducing the number of strokes required. Really quite simple and ingenious, and creates razor sharp durable edges quickly. Brent Beach did a remarkable job of developing and proving out an effective, repeatable, and reasonable cost method for sharpening. I use the main concepts he describes with some modifications to simplify the jigs. The edges produced are sharper and longer lasting than any I could produce by free hand or the Tormek method.

View Vincent Nocito's profile

Vincent Nocito

455 posts in 2109 days


#10 posted 01-02-2014 05:11 PM

Woodsmith #210 (current issue) page 6 has a homemade honing guide for plane irons.

View Derek Cohen's profile

Derek Cohen

185 posts in 2713 days


#11 posted 01-07-2014 02:00 PM

Multiple secondary bevels reduces the amount of material removal required to smooth the edge to the next grit level, reducing the number of strokes required. Really quite simple and ingenious, and creates razor sharp durable edges quickly. Brent Beach did a remarkable job of developing and proving out an effective, repeatable, and reasonable cost method for sharpening. I use the main concepts he describes with some modifications to simplify the jigs. The edges produced are sharper and longer lasting than any I could produce by free hand or the Tormek method.

It is a whole bunch easier to simply hollow grind the bevel at the desired angle, and freehand on the hollow. This is a self-jigging guide. The closer to the edge of the blade you get, the less metal to remove when sharpening. This is where a Tormek scores, as it can grind to the edge of the blade. It is not necessary to go down that path however – even a dry grinder can get you close.

Honing freehand on the hollow takes me about 30 seconds from beginning to end, and no guide to set up when you wish to re-sharpen. This is the most important factor in sharpening. Anyone can get a blade sharp – but how quickly can you re-sharpen the edge. Multiple secondary bevels require multiple set ups. Freehand on a hollow requires just one.

Regards from Perth

Derek

-- Buildiing furniture, and reviewing and building tools at http://www.inthewoodshop.com

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