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Titebond Liquid Hide Glue: Educate me please!

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Forum topic by Lee Barker posted 03-04-2013 04:59 PM 1612 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1539 days


03-04-2013 04:59 PM

If you use it daily in conjunction with Titebond, I’d like to know when you choose the hide glue.

What characteristics make it preferable in a given situation?

It what applications is it a distant second to TB?

Thanks for sharing your expertise with me.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"


11 replies so far

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

3446 posts in 1502 days


#1 posted 03-04-2013 05:05 PM

I have my routine with TBII and TBII Extend, but I haven’t used their hide glue. With the original hide glue you could apparently steam joints apart if needed. If that is the case, I wouldn’t have much use for it.

Someone will educate us.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

5084 posts in 1266 days


#2 posted 03-04-2013 05:07 PM

http://www.titebond.com/product.aspx?id=9e9995b4-08eb-4fc6-8254-c47daa20f8ed

A lot of info from the manufacturer. I like to hear from others as well, as it
doesn’t stain your clothes like TBIII.

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1847 days


#3 posted 03-04-2013 05:26 PM

Open time is 20 to 30 minutes. It dries quite dark. I don’t think it dries as strong as the PVAs and ARs, but I could be wrong about that. There is reputedly a half-year shelf life…I have some expired, but have not tested it.

I use it when the weather is hot here in Texas if I’m worried about open time. Not much practice with it though.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5089 posts in 1487 days


#4 posted 03-04-2013 06:14 PM

I can’t speak for the Titebond brand but I use hide glues almost exclusively so I can answer some of your question.

1) A great advantage of all hide glues is that they are reversible. This is probably the most important.
2) Hide glues don’t creep, they dry hard so spring-back in curved lamination is very small or non-existent.
3) Hide glue glue lines actually get smaller as they dry.
4) If and when repair is required, you don’t need to remove all the old glue.
5) Squeeze-out can be cleaned up with water and won’t affect subsequent finishing.
6) If you throw in a press with heated cauls, the advantages in veneer restoration and marquetry are extensive.

The only real advantage of liquid hide glue over hot hide glue is it’s working time.

Hide glues are as strong as pva’s generally speaking. Once stronger than the wood, who cares anyway?

If you don’t need the open time, hot hide glue offers more advantages like clamp-less gluing, quick initial set
and the ability to hammer veneer.
If you want to look more deeply into hide glues, check this blog.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

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jdmaher

288 posts in 1268 days


#5 posted 03-04-2013 06:15 PM

I use it when I want to move slow and I’m doing darker wood and I expect to make a mess.

So, gluing up the back of a cherry console with 3 rails, 3 stiles and 5 panels, I want to take my time and I want to be sure I can “persuade” the final panel to square. And I ALWAYS make a mess, so the water clean-up is nice.

I wouldn’t use it with lighter woods. Or anything that would be exposed to even moderate damp conditions (garage cabinets/benches, bathroom vanities, etc.).

I like the open time and I really like the water clean-up.

-- Jim Maher, Illinois

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1539 days


#6 posted 03-04-2013 06:22 PM

The last two posts are particularly helpful.

I was wondering about the no-clamp, quick tack thing with the hot stuff.

I did not know that hide glue would bond to itself (dried).

Thanks Jim and Paul!

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View Lee Barker's profile

Lee Barker

2169 posts in 1539 days


#7 posted 03-04-2013 06:34 PM

What about biscuits? It seems too viscous to be a successful partner there.

Kindly,

Lee

-- "...in his brain, which is as dry as the remainder biscuit after a voyage, he hath strange places cramm'd with observation, the which he vents in mangled forms." --Shakespeare, "As You Like It"

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5089 posts in 1487 days


#8 posted 03-04-2013 07:14 PM

Thanks Lee
As far as color goes, the only LHG I’ve used is Old Brown Glue and it’s not dark or too viscous for biscuits.
This is a water based glue and you can add water to thin it somewhat. It will also become less viscous if heated.

As for “damp conditions”, it takes both heat and moisture to reverse hide glues so as Patrick Edwards says
“Don’t take your furniture in the bath tub with you.” From my experience trying to reverse hide glue, you might look like an albino prune by the time you could separate the parts in the bath tub. It’s not just a matter of getting it damp. You have to soak the HOT water in to where the glue is and on a thick piece, that can be a long way from the surface.

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2598 posts in 1040 days


#9 posted 03-04-2013 10:16 PM

I like the hide glue when making filler w/ saw dust. It has better gap filling properties in my opinion.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Moron's profile

Moron

4666 posts in 2582 days


#10 posted 03-05-2013 03:19 AM

I have limited experience with hide glue.

Without exception I used hot hide glue to laminate leather to a substrate where a long open time was needed,again and same for wrapping industrial band speakers, only a different textile was applied around, rounded edges and corners, again the need for long open times needed on seemless joints ( kinda like laying wallpaper )

The even odder occasion was applying veneer to a curved surface under a vacuum press where squeeze out was an issue, as other glues are not always removable

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Patricelejeune's profile

Patricelejeune

276 posts in 609 days


#11 posted 06-06-2013 08:20 PM

If you want info on hide glue or liquid hide glue I suggest couple links.
I warn you I am biased as I work with Patrick Edwards at Antique Refinishers and we produce the liquid hide glue Old Brown Glue.
But this said, the info will work with any hide or liquid hide glue as long are they are good ones.

We started a video series on liquid hide glue where you may find “educational”. If you have questions we will answer them in video to share our answer with everyone.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/85292

and there is couple articles here and there

http://www.oldbrownglue.com/articles.html

I use it everyday for anything except for hammer veneering and rub joint where I use the hot glue.

-- Patrice lejeune

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