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Jig/Fixture Poll

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Forum topic by USCJeff posted 2619 days ago 1318 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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USCJeff

1044 posts in 2672 days


2619 days ago

I’m curious, if you had to pick one shop made jig or fixture for that has made life easier and more accurate, what would it be? It’ll most likely vary by the type of work we all do, but what is your overall choice? Pics would be great!

Mine without a doubt is my auxiliary fence for my table saw/router. My router is mounted in the table saw so the fence pulls double duty. I designed it to have table saw features on one side and router features on the other. I just flip it around when I need to use either tool. The router side is nothing innovative. It has an adjustable face for different bit sizes, T-track to hold the acrylic guard, feather boards, and sleds. The dust shoot is connected to a shop vac when it use. The fence has a removable very thin shim for jointing. The table saw fence is 7” tall. It has a T-track 4” above the table top for various jigs, hold downs, and sleds. I put an acrylic guard in the track when my normal guard is in the way.

I’ll post pics when I next enter the shop.

-- Jeff, South Carolina


15 replies so far

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2640 days


#1 posted 2619 days ago

Not really one, but the thing that makes my life easier is my shop layout. With all major tools available to me without the need to have to move things out of the way, or break something down to set something else up. With my main bench, then my auxillary bench/outfeed coplanar with my talblesaw, I have lots of work surfaces that are multi function. I would love to have a bigger shop someday, but for now, I think the layout of my little shop is really the best jig/fixture for me.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2765 days


#2 posted 2619 days ago

I have not made many jigs so far, which may be somewhat surprising. I did make a jig for cutting raised panels on a table saw, from a pictures I saw in a book. It has turned out great, and made it very easy to cut the panel bevels this way. It has allowed me to avoid buying the panel bits for my router table.

Looking ahead, there are probably several jigs I need to make. But I do not know what they will be until my next project begins. So far, I am able to do what I need with the tools at hand, or at least find a way to use the tools to do what I want. I want to make jigs that I would use over and over, not just one time ones. I just have a problem with “wasting wood” to make a jig for a single purpose that I would not use again. But that is me.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View USCJeff's profile

USCJeff

1044 posts in 2672 days


#3 posted 2619 days ago

Mot, Your too right. My shop is a 12’X20’ garage. Shop layout is therefore paramount. I have not surfaces that don’t pull double duty. My bench is designed at table saw height. My flip up planer cart is the level of my assembly table. My miter saw is embedded the countertop that spans one wall. My table saw is partially tucked under the counter and can be rolled out if a wider cut is needed. Everything must be used frequently, or able to be stored out of the way.

Bill, My router is under powered for raised panels (DW616). I built a jig for the table saw and had horrible results so the jig collected dust in a cabinet. I bought a decent blade a while back and now realize the jig was not the problem.

-- Jeff, South Carolina

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2640 days


#4 posted 2619 days ago

Just as a note, my mitre saw station is the same height as the freezer outside the shop door, so cutting long boards utilizes a little help from the appliance.

Bill, I did raised panels on the tablesaw with okay results. Not stellar, then Freud had a sale on a door bit set and once you do them on the router table, it’s just not worth using the tablesaw anymore. There is something about the precision of a matched bit set that just beats the heck out of fiddling around with the tablesaw. However, I have a friend that takes the exact opposite approach that I take and makes beutiful coves by feeding the stock at varying angles across the blade. I just don’t like doing it.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2765 days


#5 posted 2619 days ago

I guess I should say that I use the table saw for the bevel part, and use the router table for the edge/undercut portion. More work, but it has come in handy.

I agree Mot, I think the router table would be the way to go. Right now I have a Sears router table, so of course it fits Sears routers. So, I borrow my Dad’s router, which is older and probably not handle the panel bits well. I need to buy an insert (or make one) that I can attach my DeWalt 618 to. That would solve that problem.

I was thinking of building one of those router tables I saw that had both vertical and horizontal set ups. Then I could use the vertical panel bits, and not worry about the speed settings like for the big horizontal ones. One more thing for the list…

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View tooladdict's profile

tooladdict

18 posts in 2628 days


#6 posted 2617 days ago

Like everyone else, it really depends on your style. I use my leg tapering jig more then any thing else. Plans are on Finewoodworking.com

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2701 days


#7 posted 2617 days ago

I made a coping sled for my router table a while back. I have a shooting board and bench hook on my near term to do list.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2765 days


#8 posted 2616 days ago

That is great Wayne. You should show us your coping sled, as I for one need to make one as well.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View woodspar's profile

woodspar

710 posts in 2703 days


#9 posted 2616 days ago

My pick for “shop made fixture” that has been most helpful in establishing my shop and increasing my work efficiency is my miter saw station.

-- John

View USCJeff's profile

USCJeff

1044 posts in 2672 days


#10 posted 2616 days ago

Very cool miter station. My setup is nearly identical in function. Instead of the good lucking wood benchtop you have, I used a kitchen counter that I got from my parent’s when they remodeled. The miter saw is embedded to be flush as is your’s. I didn’t want a permanent fence attached to the benchtop, so I added T-Track so I could put a fence or stops in when needed, and easily remove them when not needed. This allows me to also clamp things via hold downs in the middle of the counter when planing or routing free hand. It is awesome for holding stock for my biscuit joiner as well.

-- Jeff, South Carolina

View mark's profile

mark

36 posts in 2765 days


#11 posted 2616 days ago

My pick would be the shop made crosscut sled.

It was the first jig I built and the most used. I been thinking about building a new jig to do mitered corners however now that I have a radial arm saw I am hoping that I can just use that instead.

I intend on building a tenoning jig to make cutting tenons a bit easier.

-- Mark, Norfolk, VA

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2640 days


#12 posted 2616 days ago

Yeah, Bill…those big raising bits sound like a helicopter taking off. I have a PC7518 spinning them in my table. Those horizontal raising bits look like a pretty cool setup. Something more to build, eh?

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12255 posts in 2701 days


#13 posted 2616 days ago

Bill, info on the coping sled is here.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/1061

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View niki's profile

niki

426 posts in 2684 days


#14 posted 2616 days ago

I made a few jigs/fixtures but the one that I love is the “Doweling on router table”.

Not far behind is the 45° cutting sled

And than….what I talking about….I love them all…

niki

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2765 days


#15 posted 2615 days ago

Thanks for the link Wayne, I will check it out.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

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