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Mixing linseed oil and Japan drier to make BLO

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Forum topic by Millo posted 517 days ago 1214 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Millo

543 posts in 1655 days


517 days ago

I have some Tried and True ‘Danish oil” (just linseed oil, no varnish or wax blend) and was thinking of mixing some Japan Drier in order to make my own BLO. Any suggestions on proportions?

Thanks!


8 replies so far

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1655 posts in 1098 days


#1 posted 516 days ago

I wouldn’t do it. T&T is a polymerized linseed oil….that should take care of it drying.

-- I long for the days when Coke was a cola, and a joint was a bad place to be (Merle Haggard)

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Millo

543 posts in 1655 days


#2 posted 516 days ago

Hmm, I thought that whole ‘polymerized’ thing was marketing. I used it on some very small boxes and it seeped through to the wooden pieces they were seating on after 3-4 days; that is to say: moved them from a laminated countertop worksurface, then noticed, thought 3-4 days would’ve been enough. So, I left them there for longer, kept wiping and I can’t remember when it was 100% dry—that’s the problem.

I wanna used this as a first coat on a project, followed by dewaxed ruby shellac, followed by Waterlox, gel varnish or Arm R Seal.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

1655 posts in 1098 days


#3 posted 516 days ago

I’ve never used the stuff, but as I understand it the polymerization is a pre-drying effort (you’ll find it used on tung oil as well).. It dries, much quicker than raw linseed oil, but still much more slowly than BLO. Shellac can go on BLO much sooner than any other finish. Jeff Jewitt has a finish schedule he calls “quick and dirty french polish” where he applies a light coat of BLO, wipes it off and applies shellac the same day. Point being, you can probably put the garnet on sooner than you think, but you could also try it with the japan drier. Would it just be easier to pick up a small can of BLO and use it? No reason to experiment on your project.

-- I long for the days when Coke was a cola, and a joint was a bad place to be (Merle Haggard)

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Millo

543 posts in 1655 days


#4 posted 516 days ago

REgarding how quickly Jewitt adds the shellac film: You’re right. I have his video and have seen it, but hadn’t thought of it.

However, I know I will want to try a varnish/oil recipe that calls for Japan drier in the future (Don Kondra’s recipe), and I already have that can of Tried & Ture, which I won’t use often and boy, it yields and yields and yields… Knowing it’s thoroughly dry and at least partially cured I thought would lower risks.

Thanks!

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1396 posts in 966 days


#5 posted 516 days ago

The only thing linseed oil is good for is starting fires. Use a real finish, like poly.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

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Kazooman

58 posts in 557 days


#6 posted 516 days ago

I like oil finishes, but they do require time and patience. You didn’t mention what wood you had used the Tried and True on. Some open pored woods will act like you say. You have to return to them and wipe them down over and over again. It seems to never end. Oak is particularly bad in this regard. If you are looking for speed, then another finish is probably the answer.

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11639 posts in 2293 days


#7 posted 516 days ago

From the T&T website ; How do I use it? Apply a thin coat. It is almost impossible to use too little. Allow the finish to sit on the surface about 1 hour. Wipe dry and buff. Consult the label for instructions on how to dispose of wiping cloths.

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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Millo

543 posts in 1655 days


#8 posted 515 days ago

Yup, believe it or not, I actually had read the label this time around, LOL! Yes, I’ve used it correctly. It simply takes a while. It’s not the varnish/oil, which really takes a long while in drying, as per others’ stories (people who have used both products). I’ll start experimenting on my sanded samples this Tuesday.

If I ever make a crib, I plan to use it for any “chewable” parts ;-).

Thanks

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