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Machining Wolmanized lumber

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Forum topic by needshave posted 02-27-2013 06:06 PM 680 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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needshave

150 posts in 613 days


02-27-2013 06:06 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question cedar

I’m going to make an arched Pergola for the rear of our property, In what we call the courtyard. Fancy little area with brick walkways,shrubs, trees and such. I would like to prefabricate all the pieces in my shop and take home to install. There will be a considerable amount of band saw or radius work. I have never used the bandsaw or any of my shop tools to cut womanized lumber. Simply circular saws. Does Anyone have an experience using the band-saw for womanized lumber? The band saw blade would be the only machine used in the shop. If I use the band saw I will need to use an aggressive blade and one that will clear the dust out quickly. My concern is that the saw is going to gum up quickly and coat the tires. Womanizing is always wet and I’m not sure I want to expose the equipment to that. I could use a jig saw or saw-zal but that will take a while. Any thoughts? Cedar is an option, but would prefer Womanized.


6 replies so far

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Loren

7556 posts in 2302 days


#1 posted 02-27-2013 06:13 PM

Use a blade with a low TPI and a lot of set. If you
can only run 1/2” wide blades you’ll be limited in
your choices.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1837 days


#2 posted 02-27-2013 06:17 PM

Usually Wolmanized wood is for ground contact. You could make it out of cedar and attach it to poured concrete with brackets or even use short Wolmanized posts with brackets that would hold and support the cedar pergola.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

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needshave

150 posts in 613 days


#3 posted 02-27-2013 06:31 PM

Coastie,

I thought about that, the thing that is holding me back is most of the wood around it is wolmanized. There is a privacy fence around the back three sides all wolmainized, so I was trying to be consistent.

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RetiredCoastie

999 posts in 1837 days


#4 posted 02-27-2013 06:38 PM

Usually the wolmanized wood is wet because it hasn’t had time to dry. If you let the wood set in an enclosed area for a short period of time it will dry and you shouldn’t have any problem cutting it or gumming up your band saw. I’ve used wolmanized wood for several outdoor projects and have had no problems as long as the wood is dry.

-- www.thepatriotwoodworker.com Proud Supporter of Homes For Our Troops

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LoydMoore

96 posts in 611 days


#5 posted 02-27-2013 06:44 PM

There are reasons they call it WOMANized lumber.

No matter how well you plan, all of the twists and turns will throw you off course
What ever you do with it is wrong
No matter how you treat it, it will gun up the works
Once you get it up, all of the inperfections will be discussed at length

-- Loyd, San Angelo, TX http:www.moorewoodenboxes.com

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needshave

150 posts in 613 days


#6 posted 02-27-2013 06:51 PM

Sorry. Was not my intent to spell it that way, spell checker is sure it knows what I’m thinking, just like the wife, it was changed and I did not notice the change. But I get the drift, yes, I get your drift, and I’m sure there will be several “board” meetings over this before it’s done.

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