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Stabilizing punky wood slab

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Forum topic by Manitario posted 542 days ago 2367 views 2 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Manitario

2299 posts in 1509 days


542 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: stabilizing wood

Hey all, I have a large slab of redwood burl that I want to make into a coffee table. As you can see from the pics, some of the wood on the edges is pretty soft. I have read about turners using epoxy/CA glue to stabilize wood for small turning projects, however I’m not sure how I’d use CA glue to stabilize the large edge of this slab. I have also read about using Polycryl to stabilize punky wood. Anyone have any suggestions or actual experience stabilizing large areas of punky wood like this? I’d rather not cut the edge back if I don’t have to…
Thanks!!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil


17 replies so far

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CharlesNeil

1127 posts in 2497 days


#1 posted 542 days ago

pour on epoxy , only way to go in my opinion’

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2299 posts in 1509 days


#2 posted 542 days ago

Thanks Charles; can I just simply pour the epoxy onto the edges after I clean them up a bit?

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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CharlesNeil

1127 posts in 2497 days


#3 posted 542 days ago

yes you can , I prefer to thin the first coat about 25 % with acetone and brush it on and let it soak in well, after that you can either finish with another coating or continue with the epoxy ,Lowes has one by Zinnzer that I have used. Some of the craft stors has one called Enviorlite, its actually a polyester, but behaves the same.

Redwood is beautiful, but very soft, I would do the entire thing to “firm up the ” wood.

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

13737 posts in 964 days


#4 posted 542 days ago

Pour on epoxy will work. If you’ve never used it before, put something on the floor to catch the mess. First time can get ugly. As for CA, it works great but it would take a lot to do those edges. Water based poly could work as well. Let itsoak in and dry. It wworks on my blue pine anyway.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

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Monte Pittman

13737 posts in 964 days


#5 posted 542 days ago

I just realized who gave you the original epoxy advice. My advice then becomes, do whatever Charles tells you and you’ll be fine. :-)

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2299 posts in 1509 days


#6 posted 542 days ago

Thanks again Charles, the Envirolite that you suggested for my last project worked really well. I like the idea of being able to thin the epoxy a bit with acetone; hopefully it’ll soak into the edges a bit better that way.
Monte; I’m going to wear an armband in the shop that says “WWCND” ie. What Would Charles Neil Do?

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10721 posts in 1316 days


#7 posted 542 days ago

Rob, Let us know when you start marketing those arm bands. We all need one!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View Jim Bertelson's profile

Jim Bertelson

3642 posts in 1790 days


#8 posted 542 days ago

This should be of use to a lot of people, good post. Didn’t realize that stabilizing stuff was readily available.

-- Jim, Anchorage Alaska

View coachmancuso's profile

coachmancuso

257 posts in 557 days


#9 posted 541 days ago

Will this process work on all types of wood? I have spalted maple that I need to stabilize.

-- Coach Mancuso

View CharlesNeil's profile

CharlesNeil

1127 posts in 2497 days


#10 posted 541 days ago

yes sir , it works well on any wood, the key is do the first coat or 2 thinned so it can soak it up.

as to the arm bands (LOL) , just ask, glad to help if I can

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2944 posts in 913 days


#11 posted 541 days ago

Haha, you definitely don’t want to use CA on that much, the fumes will kill you.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6798 posts in 1777 days


#12 posted 541 days ago

There is also a Minwax Wood Hardener product that is basically thinned out Epoxy I have used on some rotten patio furniture that works pretty good.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View jefbelgium's profile

jefbelgium

5 posts in 552 days


#13 posted 541 days ago

You will have to protect the epoxy from UV light, sunlight, with a Varnish that has UV protection. Marine varnishes are really good. I use epiphanes. I think it is available in the US.

Jef

View crossroad's profile

crossroad

3 posts in 170 days


#14 posted 149 days ago

Hello to all – I’m new to the site and need some advice. I’ve got a beautiful and heavily spalted oak slab that I plan on turning into a breakfast table. If I use a thinned epoxy, how far can I sand after it dries and will I still need a grain filler? FYI, I plan on finishing with thinned P&L 38

View Manitario's profile

Manitario

2299 posts in 1509 days


#15 posted 149 days ago

Good questions crossroad; I did a basic sanding with 80 grit before I applied the epoxy, after the epoxy dried then I sanded through to 180 and started finishing. I don’t think the thinned epoxy itself acts as a grain filler, you want it to soak into the wood rather than sit on the surface. You might get better answers to your question if you post it as a forum topic, old threads like this one don’t get a lot of action!

-- Sometimes the creative process requires foul language. -- Charles Neil

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