LumberJocks

how to dry green would without kiln

  • Advertise with us

« back to LumberJocks.com Site Feedback forum

Forum topic by gregIND posted 548 days ago 678 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View gregIND's profile

gregIND

20 posts in 555 days


548 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

I work at small pallet shop for my second job. we get new wood n to build some new pallets . it is pretty green when we get it . ive tried to use a few pieces and it warps over nite. is there any way to dry it without a kiln? like some small pieces for cutting boards? thanks for any input.

-- gregIND


8 replies so far

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

803 posts in 742 days


#1 posted 548 days ago

A friend cuts logs into boards a little over an inch thick, stickers them and stores them in his attic with a heavy weight on top.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2489 posts in 982 days


#2 posted 548 days ago

Yes, you can air dry. Stack sticker and wait.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View gregIND's profile

gregIND

20 posts in 555 days


#3 posted 548 days ago

thanks for replies but is there any way to do it quiker? would it work to put it n an old oven overnite on the lowest setting and if u store it in attic how long should u leave it there?

-- gregIND

View Post_Oakie's profile

Post_Oakie

84 posts in 785 days


#4 posted 548 days ago

Part of the problem with using pallet stock (I’ve cut quite a bit of it) is that it is typically from logs too poor for anything else. Your best bet is to pick pieces as carefully as you can. Based on my experience running a portable sawmill, Post oak and hackberry tend to warp and twist as they dry. Yellow poplar is fairly stable and nice to work with. I have made some nice projects out of yellow poplar salvaged from pallets. Sycamore can be good, especially if quartersawn, but if the log had a spiral grain, the boards will twist as they dry. Try to get the straightest grain you can, with the growth rings centered on the board. Quartersawn is good, but not if it has the juvenile wood (within 1/2” of the center of the growth rings).

Indoors, in an out-of-the-way place, 4” off the floor and stickered with a fan or two to circulate the air through the stack is ideal. For something like cutting boards, a couple of months in the winter, maybe three months in the summer, depending on how humid your house is. Do a web search for “oven dry wood test” for info on measuring moisture content without a meter. It also turned up info on microwave drying wood—maybe someone on the forum has tried it.

-- Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

View gregIND's profile

gregIND

20 posts in 555 days


#5 posted 548 days ago

thank you Oakie that helps we jst got some real nice walnut and birch in and they both warped over nite the birch was the worst. still cant believe we are making pallets out of walnut . we are making some small crates out of it that will hold fertilizer made out of fish thats suppose to go in all lowes stores.

-- gregIND

View Post_Oakie's profile

Post_Oakie

84 posts in 785 days


#6 posted 548 days ago

How thick are the boards? I should have asked that before. Thinner wood is a lot harder to dry straight—some come out like potato chips. If possible select pieces more than 1” thick, dry, then rip to final thickness on a band saw. Walnut & birch? Guess I shouldn’t be surprised. Probably cut from large branches, which is almost impossible to dry straight. Nail them in place while green, and they’ll last long enough for a shipment.

-- Good judgement comes from experience. Experience comes from bad judgement.

View gregIND's profile

gregIND

20 posts in 555 days


#7 posted 547 days ago

thanks oakie will try that most is over an inch

-- gregIND

View sprucegum's profile

sprucegum

323 posts in 629 days


#8 posted 547 days ago

I sometimes dry small pieces that I am in a hurry for by putting them on a ceiling rack almost over my wood burning furnace in the basement. It gets pretty hot there and green wood will dry in 2 weeks if I am burning wood. Sometimes it twists and cracks painting the ends helps. usually I can straiten them out by flat buzzing them on my jointer. The good thing is you don’t have to worry about you project twisting when you put it in a warm dry house it has already been there done that. If you have a warm air oil or gas furnace it should work just a little slower.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase