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Laminating pieces with curved edges

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Forum topic by docspencer posted 543 days ago 630 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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docspencer

197 posts in 571 days


543 days ago

I want to make a clock by laminating pieces of different woods together – basically a butcher block look but for a clock. I want to glue together pieces with gentle curves but can’t figure out how to cut the curves so they glue together tightly. Does this make sense?


13 replies so far

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runswithscissors

904 posts in 650 days


#1 posted 543 days ago

I think we need a photo or sketch to see clearly what you are trying to do.

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Loren

7390 posts in 2273 days


#2 posted 543 days ago

Make templates out of 1/4” material with the curves carefully
sawn out and shaped to fit together. Then use pattern
routing methods to cut out the parts. Bearing guided
bits bearings are usually pretty close in size to the actual
cutting diameter. With gentle curves this will not be a
problem but if the curves are more dramatic the
bearing guided bit may make a problem if the size
of cutter or bearing is off spec.

Pat Warner is a real expert in precision template routing
and has instructional material available.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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docspencer

197 posts in 571 days


#3 posted 543 days ago

Templates – great idea. Wish I had a bandsaw – we’ll see how well my jigsaw cuts. I was looking for an excuse to buy a top bearing bit. I’ll draw a picture and post it

Looks like I have to go through photobucket to post on this forum. Gotta figure that out.

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docspencer

197 posts in 571 days


#4 posted 543 days ago

Here’s a very rough drawing of the sort of thing I’m talking about.

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runswithscissors

904 posts in 650 days


#5 posted 542 days ago

Looks like half your sketch got chopped off. Same thing happened to me on my blog when I added photos via photobucket. Are you aiming for a mantle style clock? I’m guessing you want your laminations to be vertical, oriented left to right (or could be stacked top to bottom, or front to rear?) In any case, I’d first cut the curves to your pattern (a paper or light cardboard pattern), cut out close to to the line, staying outside it, glue them together, and then plane, rasp, and sand to the final shape. If you had access to a bandsaw, you could do the glue up first, then saw to shape. A wide belt sander would help in the shaping, and you could use the end of the sander (the drum or spindle end) for sanding the concave curves. A stationary sander would be best.

If this doesn’t address your problem, let us know, and we’ll give it another shot.

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Woodendeavor

212 posts in 1232 days


#6 posted 542 days ago

Look at how they build the different drunken cutting boards. They stack 2 boards on top of each other and then cut out the curves. They then swap out the pieces and you have 2 of them with the woods opposite each other

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docspencer

197 posts in 571 days


#7 posted 542 days ago

Brilliant!

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docspencer

197 posts in 571 days


#8 posted 542 days ago

Looked that up. I think I get it. One question – what purpose do the thin little strips in between the curved pieces serve?

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palaswood

693 posts in 377 days


#9 posted 58 days ago

the thin strips are simply a design element docspencer, and introduce a huge difficulty factor in my opinion. But if thats what you’re going for, it’s a common practice in cutting boards here on LJs, and looks cool. Some very good blogs on it here too.

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

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palaswood

693 posts in 377 days


#10 posted 58 days ago

not to discourage you! If you can manage, go for it, but without a band saw, It would be super tough to pull off, I think. But I havent tried it.

-- Joseph, Lake Forest, CA, http://instagram.com/palas_woodcraft#

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docspencer

197 posts in 571 days


#11 posted 57 days ago

Palaswood – I do have a scroll saw. I figure it might be useful if the pieces aren’t too thick or too hard. I might try it with that tool. Thanks all for all the helpful advice.

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Stoli

44 posts in 1993 days


#12 posted 57 days ago

I believe the strips are there to account for the bandsaw kerf and the slightly different radii of curvature of the pieces. The FWW curved inlay method takes this to an extreme by using a 1/4” bit and 1/4” worth of material. Check out the following link for an example:

http://drunkenwoodworker.com/how-make-curved-inlay

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docspencer

197 posts in 571 days


#13 posted 57 days ago

He makes it look so easy…..but as he says “practice, practice, practice….” Great results, though!

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