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Where can I find concealed brackets for a floating shelf without buying a shelf kit?

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Forum topic by hopingtodoitmyself posted 02-24-2013 10:26 AM 30989 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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hopingtodoitmyself

3 posts in 638 days


02-24-2013 10:26 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question floating shelf solid wood shelf hardware blind shelf support concealed shelf support teak modern

I already have the wooden shelves that I want to use. I would prefer to have them floating, as I am trying to achieve a low profile, Zen look. From searching the Internet, I understand that I will need to drill long holes through the shelves (back to front) and then attach pins/bolts through them that are attached to a long narrow plate that extends beyond the pins, and which is attached to the wall, and is concealed behind the shelf. However, I cannot find the hardware to install them except in Australia. I couldn’t copy the picture, but here is the link:

Ihttp://www.shelvingshop.com.au/shopexd.asp?id=832

It shows a long bar with 2 protruding bolts/pins. The description is:

Floating shelf bracket
Finish Black
Material – steel
For shelves to 500mm long
5PB4520
NEW FOR THINNER SHELVES!

1) Does anyone know of a source for a product like this in the US? I have seen products that are single pins with single back plates, but nothing where those pins are attached to a long plate, which I think would give it more stability.

2) The available wall does not have studs in the area where these shelves need to be installed (a small wall beside the bathroom sink). The total wall spans about 24”, from the mirror to a closet, and the sheetrock was mounted on either end, with no studs in between. Therefore, I will have to install the brackets in sheetrock with, I’m assuming, mega wall anchors. The shelves are approximately 18” x 6” x 1/34”, and are made of teak, and I will be using them only for small decorative items like perfume bottles or candles, perhaps a vase, so they will not be supporting a lot of weight. Does anyone see a problem if I cannot use studs? What type of anchor would you recommend?

3) If this method is not recommended, do you have any suggestions as to how to mount them with the least visible clutter?

I will appreciate any assistance you can provide.
Thank you.


14 replies so far

View Straightbowed's profile

Straightbowed

717 posts in 1018 days


#1 posted 02-24-2013 10:34 AM

make your own jig using small blocks of wood insert them through a hole in the wall and then turn them vertical take a pc of wood or plywood and attach it to the bolts sticking out of the wall then slide your shelf over it and pin it at the top that what I done when I floated my shelves with no studs

-- Stevo, work in tha city woodshop in the country

View coachmancuso's profile

coachmancuso

259 posts in 651 days


#2 posted 02-24-2013 01:03 PM

I make mine out of wood . I used a 1×2 and then attached cleats sticking out from the cleats to the depth of the shelf . That attaches to the wall and then the shelf sldes over and you nail it to the 1×2 against the wall.

-- Coach Mancuso

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2113 days


#3 posted 02-24-2013 01:23 PM

IKEA uses the same system, their floating shelves are very affordable priced, perhaps you can buy the whole thing just to get the bracket.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View hopingtodoitmyself's profile

hopingtodoitmyself

3 posts in 638 days


#4 posted 02-24-2013 08:50 PM

Thank you all for taking the time to respond. I appreciate it. However, I’m afraid that I am not an experienced woodworker. I am basically a try to repair/reuse/repurpose it myself kind of person, and so I am not familiar with all of the woodworking tools/terms being used. I probably should do a search for “Woodworking for Dummies” and start at the beginning.

In any case, I do not think that I made my description clear enough. When I said that I had a shelf, I meant a regular shelf, flat board—not a hollow box that could slide over anything. The wood is 1” thick, and so I thought that I would simply make your own jig using small blocks of wood insert them through a hole in the wall and then turn them vertical take a pc of wood or plywood and attach it to the bolts sticking out of the wall then slide your shelf over it and pin it at the top that what I done when I floated my shelves with no studs holes through it (back to front) to attach to the type of hanger I’ve been trying to find. I am not looking forward to the drilling part, as I imagine that the angle of all holes need to be perfectly matched in order to for the shelf to slide onto the pins/bolts without bending them and causing stress breaks in the sheetrock. ANY ADVICE ON THIS ASPECT WOULD ALSO BE WELCOME

Response 1: “make your own jig using small blocks of wood insert them through a hole in the wall and then turn them vertical take a pc of wood or plywood and attach it to the bolts sticking out of the wall then slide your shelf over it and pin it at the top that what I done when I floated my shelves with no studs”

I don’t really understand what you mean by making my own jig, nor what is meant by attaching a piece of wood through the wall. How do I secure those pieces of wood? And them you recommend attaching a 1×2 to the bolts stidking out of the wall. Do you mean that I should attach bolts to the pieces of wood I just inserted into the wall? I also don’t understand what is meant by the bolts sticking out of the wall, What bolts, and how would I attach them in the first place? And if I’m attaching a 1×2 would I need more bolts on the front of it to insert into the holes I drill through the shelf board, or would I drill holes in the 1×2 and insert the bolts mentioned above through it? In any case, since the shelf itself is only 1” thick, it seems that a 1×2 strip of wood on the wall would show at the back of the shelf, both above and below the shelf.

Response 2: “I make mine out of wood . I used a 1×2 and then attached cleats sticking out from the cleats to the depth of the shelf . That attaches to the wall and then the shelf sldes over and you nail it to the 1×2 against the wall”

Can you please explain what you mean that you attached cleats sticking out from the cleats? I’m completely lost on that one. And once again, if the wood is a 1×2, it seems that it would show at the back of the shelf from both the bottom and the top since the shelf is only 1” thick.

Response 3: “IKEA uses the same system, their floating shelves are very affordable priced, perhaps you can buy the whole thing just to get the bracket.”
Ikea is not the only one making these; there are hundreds for sale on the web. What is flummoxing me is that they all use (I’m assuming) similar mounting hardware, but that hardware does not seem to be available for independent purchase anywhere.

The closest hardware match I’ve been able to find in the States is available through Rockler. Their pins are attached to a plate measuring 15/16” high x 1-1/2” long. The plates would therefore be hidden (barely) by the shelf. However, they are stand alone pins, not attached to a longer plate spanning the length of the shelf, and so I’m afraid that they won’t provide sufficient stability. Another option is provided through Smart Furniture, called a “Ping Shelf Bracket” That one is attached perpendicularly to the wall, and doesn’t even include a plate, and they recommend placing the shelf on top of it, rather than through holes drilled through the shelf. I believe that it is used most often for glass shelves, although they also state that you can use them for wood shelves.

However, both of these are recommended for use on masonry walls or with studs. If I end up needing to go that route, WHAT TYPE OF MOLLIES SHOULD I USE TO ATTACH THEM AS SECURELY AS POSSIBLE?

Thanks again for all of your suggestions.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

1147 posts in 745 days


#5 posted 02-24-2013 11:16 PM

This probably isn’t what you’re looking for, but your question got me thinking about a glass shelf SWMBO had me install in our bathroom. This shelf is about 5” deep by 18” long, and 3/8” thick. This was designed to be mounted in a corner. On the long edge against the wall, and the short end at the corner, tabs about 1/2” deep by 2” long protruded from the glass—about 3 or 4 of these on the long side and 1 or 2 at the end. The method of mounting was to carefully use a sharp utility (razor) knife to slice through the paper dry wall surface, then carefully excavate a cavity for these protruding tabs. Then the holes were filled with a caulk/adhesive like Polyyseamseal, and the tabs pressed in place. Squeeze out of excess caulk then had to be scraped off. Note that the strength of this system depends on it being installed into a corner.

Eventually, we decided that the shelf needed to be reoriented, with the long side now on the right side of the corner rather than the left. To my surprise, getting the thing unstuck from the wall was a heck of a challenge. It was way stronger than I would have guessed. I think I could have stood on it.

The nice thing about this is that no support of any kind is visible, and it doesn’t require any solid structure behind the drywall.

She bought the shelf from a catalog or online, and I don’t remember who the vendor was. If you were to try this, you might be able to use thinner teak, say 1/2” or 5/8”. The tabs could be cut on a bandsaw, scroll saw, or with a jigsaw (aka saber or bayonet saw). If there were a concern about the strength of the tabs along the long side (the grain orientation might make them vulnerable to splitting off), you could drill a hole and put in a small dowel for strength.

Anyhow, good luck with the project!

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View GaryL's profile

GaryL

1080 posts in 1550 days


#6 posted 02-24-2013 11:25 PM

Check with a local welding shop or a friend that has a welder to see if they could fabricate a few for you for a reasonable price. That way you can have them make them to any specs you desire.

-- Gary; Marysville, MI...Involve your children in your projects as much as possible, the return is priceless.

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1689 days


#7 posted 02-24-2013 11:51 PM

Have you searched for concealed shelf supports? They are listed on ebay. You could use spring toggle fixings to attach them to the wall.

View cnarf's profile

cnarf

43 posts in 757 days


#8 posted 02-25-2013 12:00 PM

I have found these excellent for hollow plasterboard fixing
http://www.toggler.com/products/snaptoggle/overview.php

-- cnarf, Ireland

View NorthAve's profile

NorthAve

1 post in 513 days


#9 posted 06-29-2013 01:07 AM

In the event you are still looking for a solution, check out the Blind Shelf Supports from Rockler here: http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=17507. It a manufactured product similar to what GaryL has suggested above. I just came across them for a project I am working on and have not yet received them so I cannot provide any firsthand experience about them.

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Dexter1221

4 posts in 390 days


#10 posted 10-30-2013 03:40 AM

Here is a good shelving shop in the UK & in Australia.

View Peewee777's profile

Peewee777

1 post in 327 days


#11 posted 01-01-2014 12:36 AM

I’ve also have been looking for a solution but the few items I’ve come across don’t quite fit the bill for a fair price.
I will be experimenting with steel rods; one end sunk into the stud and another into the shelf.
Only downside I can think of is accuracy.

View James Hou's profile

James Hou

5 posts in 467 days


#12 posted 01-02-2014 04:51 AM

Hi,
Maybeyou could visit www.homegardenmax.com, they are seller of floating shelves in CA, if they could supply you a right size metal backplate, you problem will be solved.
And i saw they also supply some shelf brackets, do they of any help to you?

-- http://www.huayi-wood.com

View hopingtodoitmyself's profile

hopingtodoitmyself

3 posts in 638 days


#13 posted 01-02-2014 06:03 AM

Thank you to everyone who replied for all of your advice and support.

I believe that I have found the perfect solution. When I first located them, the manufacturer, Italiana Ferramenta, based in Italy, did not yet have a US supplier. They do now, and I’ve provided the link. However, they appear to be a wholesale distributor, and their website suggests checking your local hardware store (for all of their products). However, I would simply call and ask them who is carrying them at the retail level. If you visit the page, be sure to click on the video. These are great! They are similar to the Blind Shelf Supports sold by Rockler, but are ADJUSTABLE. Their adjustability allows you to tilt the rods slightly upward, which apparently will solve the shelves from tilting forward. They appear to give a lot more control, and to be easier to install, than steel rods alone. I can only hit one stud, so for the bracket that will hit sheetrock, I’m going to use toggle bolts.

http://www.richelieu.com/en/triade-mini-concealed-mounting-bracket-1621412G?data=1&fr=

Thank you again.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

50 posts in 528 days


#14 posted 02-19-2014 02:01 AM

In the past I have run lag screws into the studs and then cut off the heads leaving several inches sticking out from the wall. Then I drill hole in the shelves to match and slide the shelf over the screws. It makes for a very strong support and best of all its really cheap! (-:

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