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trestle chair?

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Forum topic by moshel posted 02-23-2013 08:31 PM 884 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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moshel

864 posts in 2341 days


02-23-2013 08:31 PM

I am thinking about building a set of dining chairs. while considering the different options, i suddenly realized i have never seen a trestle chair. wouldn’t this go really well with trestle table?

i think the joints can be made strong enough so it would be like a conoid chair just really much easier to build.

while on the subject, what would be the best method to do the back? i think spindles are out of the question – i don’t have neither the lathe nor the talent to make them.

any ideas would be most welcome.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...


19 replies so far

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SPalm

4820 posts in 2539 days


#1 posted 02-23-2013 08:56 PM

Sounds like an interesting idea.

I have always kind of liked the back of Kevin Rodel’s arts and crafts chair. It is a comfortable back. If you just google “Rodel Chair” you will see examples of it.

Quite a few have been built here at LJs, and he does a complete video of the build process at FWW, if you want to go that far.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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Loren

7567 posts in 2305 days


#2 posted 02-23-2013 09:01 PM

Nakashima Studio builds a sort of trestle-ish chair.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112103 posts in 2234 days


#3 posted 02-23-2013 09:03 PM

sounds like a bench?

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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Loren

7567 posts in 2305 days


#4 posted 02-23-2013 09:08 PM

Good one, Jim.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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moshel

864 posts in 2341 days


#5 posted 02-23-2013 09:19 PM

Loren, the Nakashima one is the conoid i referred to. its n interesting project to make but it really looks good with the spindles and i think other kids of “square” backs would look strange on it.

A1Jim – yes, a narrow bench :-) being a chair to complement my beautiful trestle table it needs to be reasonably refined and not rustic. I was just wondering why no one ever made one. usually there is a good reason…..

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

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Loren

7567 posts in 2305 days


#6 posted 02-23-2013 09:29 PM

You can order spindle turnings for chair backs easily. There
are many suppliers and most any windsor chair maker
should be set up to do them efficiently.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

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moshel

864 posts in 2341 days


#7 posted 02-23-2013 09:31 PM

ha! i live in NZ – nothing is easy here!

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

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a1Jim

112103 posts in 2234 days


#8 posted 02-23-2013 09:31 PM

If I understand right about what your talking about these are close

http://www.styleture.com/2010/01/06/natures-blueprint-stone-forests-wooden-inspiration/

As you can see these I found on line made by “Stone Forest”

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

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moshel

864 posts in 2341 days


#9 posted 02-23-2013 09:35 PM

These are not what I had in mind. the trestle table is modern and not slab. they should look like proper dining chairs (much like the Nakashima conoid) but instead of having 4 legs they will have 2 I legs with a small beam. couldn’t find anything like it.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

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a1Jim

112103 posts in 2234 days


#10 posted 02-23-2013 09:49 PM

It doesn’t take a lot of skill to turn spindles,just a little practice and you can use a shop made tool like this.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rpxp1cNqEq8

or this

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2571 days


#11 posted 02-23-2013 10:37 PM

It’s probably been done but here are a few reasons why it might not produce the best chair – basically a problem with strength..
1) hard to lean back on them
2) lots of stresses where you don’t want them – stress is not evenly distributed => high probability of failure
3) if stretcher shifts or twists, your 4 legs won’t stay flat on the ground

here are suggestions on what makes a good chair from Mike Abbott, chairmaker
http://www.living-wood.co.uk/judging_a_greenwood_chair.html

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

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moshel

864 posts in 2341 days


#12 posted 02-23-2013 10:45 PM

the leaning problem is the same as the conoid and they did pretty well :-)

as for the stress, you are right but on the other hand the trestle structure gives you much more area to work and fortify the joint. but basically it requires very hard and solid wood.

as for 3 – that’s not true. regular chair has 4 places it can (and does) twist. its very hard to find a chair that will not rock… if the stretcher is laminated it should be much less susceptible to twisting.

as i said – i just find it strange that i couldn’t find any on the web.

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

View daltxguy's profile

daltxguy

1373 posts in 2571 days


#13 posted 02-23-2013 11:36 PM

”i just find it strange that i couldn’t find any on the web.”

...because they are all broken :)

I think it works in a bench because you don’t use a bench the same way you use a chair and doesn’t have to have the same qualities (light and strong)

What difference is there between a trestle chair and the conoid anyway? The conoid is a trestle chair without the trestle, isn’t it?
Nakashima’s chairs look great – but it does beg the question whether they are a lasting and proven design or just a pretty design?

-- If you can't joint it, bead it!

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moshel

864 posts in 2341 days


#14 posted 02-24-2013 12:11 AM

ha ha!

long long time ago i made a trestle table http://lumberjocks.com/projects/7947
this was made of utility grade radiata framing. as you can see the trestle is in the back and the leverage is really huge. the front now carries 2 heavy sewing machines and other bits and pieces and my children climb on it to reach the cupboard above it. it is just glued with lots of biscuits….

as for the difference between trestle and conoid…. the conoid requires (because of the use of relatively thin stock) complex joints and i still have to figure out what to do for the back as he conoid design looks strange with anything but the spindles and these are hard to make and position accurately. I am trying to come with a design that i can make very quickly and will be comfortable and strong. and pretty :-)

-- The woods are lovely, dark and deep, but I have promises to keep...

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DocSavage45

5018 posts in 1499 days


#15 posted 02-24-2013 02:33 AM

Instead of spindles possibly steamed bent wood cut in an arc? Just thining out loud. LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

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