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Forum topic by George_SA posted 02-23-2013 05:31 PM 974 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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George_SA

205 posts in 930 days


02-23-2013 05:31 PM

While flush trimming the router bit’s bearing screw came loose.

How do I recover from this? Any ideas will be welcome

Regards George

-- There are some things that money can't buy - Manners, morals and integrity


27 replies so far

View Mark Davisson's profile

Mark Davisson

503 posts in 2034 days


#1 posted 02-23-2013 05:38 PM

Jim Beam.

-- I'm selfless because it feels so good!

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a1Jim

112482 posts in 2293 days


#2 posted 02-23-2013 05:41 PM

Wow sorry this happen.It’s hard to see where the damage is ,is this an edge of a table? It would help seeing where it is on your project to offer a suggested fix.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View TimberFramerBob's profile

TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 640 days


#3 posted 02-23-2013 05:47 PM

Can you run it through a jointer or is it already cut to its final dimensions? can you make it a little smaller? if not….........Jim Beam.

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

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TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 640 days


#4 posted 02-23-2013 05:48 PM

ps. a half a drop of loctite on that screw might be a good idea for the future

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

View Jorge G.'s profile

Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1191 days


#5 posted 02-23-2013 05:56 PM

The fix is a little bit difficult, as it seems you have already glued the overhanging part to your guide part. Get a chisel, preferably one of the same width as the piece you were trimming and cut the two ends where the damage started and ended at an angle like a trapezoid. Glue anew piece that protrudes at about the same height, clamp, wait until it dries and go back to trimming with the router. If you do it carefully you should be able to glue the new piece and not get any apparent lines.

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

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a1Jim

112482 posts in 2293 days


#6 posted 02-23-2013 05:56 PM

Depending where it’s at you can cut out a longer section and try and find some grain that matches and glue it in. If this is done very well it can be almost invisible. If it’s the edge of a table top you can cut both ends off of the table top and and with loose tenons make bread board ends.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View ScottKaye's profile

ScottKaye

304 posts in 669 days


#7 posted 02-23-2013 06:02 PM

Thats a pretty good price on that 16/4 oak. I calculate it out to be 36 board feet at $100 = ~ $2.78 a board foot. Not bad on 4 year old air dried 16/4 oak! Maybe you can get him down to 2.50 a bf

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

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JesseTutt

811 posts in 827 days


#8 posted 02-23-2013 06:18 PM

I have had that happen to me, so I know how it feels. Try cutting out the bad area.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

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needshave

150 posts in 676 days


#9 posted 02-23-2013 06:20 PM

I can’t really tell what you have there. But, I was wondering if you could undercut it, basically making it a deep dado or mortise, then make a trim of your needs that would fit tightly into the dado or mortise to trim out. much like a tenon into a dado or mortise. Once Glued together, sufficient stock would remain to trim. then give it another shot. Check that bearing first though. Good luck, let us know what you do to repair, then jim beam.

View George_SA's profile

George_SA

205 posts in 930 days


#10 posted 02-23-2013 06:23 PM

Thanks for the suggestions so far.
Sorry for not showing what my project is. It is a cutting board with a draw that I am making for my daughter (similar to this)

Due to the thickness of the wall side of the slot, I can’t really cut any of that away.

Sorry for my ignorance, but what is a Jim Beam?

Regards george

-- There are some things that money can't buy - Manners, morals and integrity

View TimberFramerBob's profile

TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 640 days


#11 posted 02-23-2013 06:27 PM

whiskey brother….......Jim Beam is whiskey

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

58 posts in 669 days


#12 posted 02-23-2013 06:28 PM

Seeing the project I would rip the damaged piece off and laminate a new section in its place.

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George_SA

205 posts in 930 days


#13 posted 02-23-2013 06:29 PM

:-) We have Johnny Walker her in South Africa. I will poer myself a shot (I am finished in the shop as it is getting late 20:28 pm)

-- There are some things that money can't buy - Manners, morals and integrity

View TimberFramerBob's profile

TimberFramerBob

68 posts in 640 days


#14 posted 02-23-2013 06:30 PM

I totally agree Kazooman

-- ..........a man who works with his hands, his brains, and his heart.....is an artist.

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George_SA

205 posts in 930 days


#15 posted 02-23-2013 06:34 PM

Kazooman, that was more or less my thinking also. Unfortunately the capacity of my saw is not wide enough. I am thinking how to overcome this with a clamped on fence or something. The Jim beam suggestions sounds very enticing
:-)

-- There are some things that money can't buy - Manners, morals and integrity

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