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Gorilla Woodworking Glue. Any good?

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Forum topic by 404 - Not Found posted 430 days ago 1056 views 0 times favorited 41 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1476 days


430 days ago

I was in my local corner shop today. Next to the fridge with the dairy produce, was a new shelf fixture with stuff like duct tape, silicon sealer and, lo and behold, a dozen bottles of Gorilla Woodworking Glue on it.

I think it was ordered by mistake and I might be able to get a good deal on it, but is it any good? Is there anything I should know about it?


41 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

6780 posts in 2154 days


#1 posted 430 days ago

It doesn’t have much of a shelf life but it works well
for certain applications. For general furniture and
cabinetmaking use, I don’t like it because I find
it messy and cleanup unpleasant. It foams up
and fills gaps so it can be useful for repairing old stuff.
Waterproof too I think.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1083 posts in 579 days


#2 posted 430 days ago

G glue is a moisture activated polyisocyanate glue (like super glue) It is exothermic, and expands. It is a great glue for gluing loose joints, and dis-similar material together. I have not seen it react with oak, but it is messy, and IMO hard to sand and use. I only use it now to redo loose joints, because it expands to fill open cavities. it should be noted this is what I know about the original G glue (orange label, brownish glue) The company makes a wide variety of adhesives now.

-- Who is John Galt?

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6711 posts in 1421 days


#3 posted 430 days ago

Wow, I know Renners asked the question, BUT I sure appreciate the detailed responses on how it operates. I first bough a bottle of GG but quickly learned about TB-III and never looked back, thoug I still have a bottle of GG sitting on the shelf. I am very familiar with CA glue, so all this make much sense to me now. THANK GUYS!

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1083 posts in 579 days


#4 posted 430 days ago

It doesn’t have much of a shelf life This is because it reacts with the moisture in the air, and co’2. To extend it’s life, squeeze the bottle until all the air is out, and then cap it. It will last longer this way, but I found you only get to do this 2 or 3 times before the tip and cap get mucked up and won’t seal. Most of the places that I used it I now use a CA glue with a catalyst for instant drying. Still great for repairing old stuff. That is all, I think I am getting stuck on this topic… ;)

-- Who is John Galt?

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2697 posts in 994 days


#5 posted 430 days ago

Both Loren and Joeyinsouthaustin couldn’t be more wrong.

The OP asked about wood working glue by Gorilla which is an excellent choice. It is a PVA glue just like TiteBond and in many cases works better. Plenty of strength, about a 10 minute open time.
It is also capable of being used with radio frequency curing.

It’s also cheaper for the 18oz size than TB… $5 or less per bottle. The small 8 oz bottles aren’t much of a buy @ $4.
Our local Ace Hardware got their display in and I bought every 18 oz. bottle they had for $4.59 ea.

I have had a bottle hidden on a shelf for two years that I forgot about and it worked just fine.

Please Gentlemen, learn the difference in Gorilla products.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

908 posts in 482 days


#6 posted 430 days ago

I use the moisture cured urethane Gorilla glue for jointing boards together. I don’t recommend it for M/T joints or similar joints as the glue does foam and expand. I have found that it can make glue joints almost invisible. It is waterproof and very durable. It is also expensive. It does sand easily and takes stain. If you use it to joint a board, scrape the excess off after it cures before sanding. It scrapes rather easily.

-- Paul, Las Vegas

View DKV's profile

DKV

3053 posts in 1011 days


#7 posted 430 days ago

Renners, I agree they probably ordered Gorilla glue and received Gorilla wood glue. Try to make a deal. They probably don’t even know they have the wrong stuff.

-- 2014 will be a different year...at least for me it will.

View 404 - Not Found's profile

404 - Not Found

2544 posts in 1476 days


#8 posted 430 days ago

It is the Gorilla Woodworking PVA that I’m talking about, not the Polyurethane one, which always seems to cure in the bottle on me.
Thanks Dallas, I will go by your recommendation. FWIW, there is not much choice in PVA glue here, any English jocks will be familiar with Evostick green or blue, but I avoid that because it reacts (leaves a stain) on oak, then there’s Hafele glue, by the gallon, and that’s about it, so I was excited to see the GWG today.

That’s quite sad isn’t it?

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1083 posts in 579 days


#9 posted 430 days ago

Thanks, sorry to be heading down the wrong track,to protect my ego I did state what glue I thought I was talking about, and checked to GG website to make sure my memory was fresh. I have never used the gg pva. But this is what I can contribute. Any PVA glue has a shelf life of about 1 year, and should be protected from freezing. If it is stringy, lumpy or separated it is no good, if not even Tightbond says it will last longer. I would buy a bottle and see if your corner shop keep didn’t get a good deal on it cause it was no good, and then, since you have that much trouble getting it, buy as much as you can use in one year???

-- Who is John Galt?

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6711 posts in 1421 days


#10 posted 430 days ago

You now Dallas, if I KNEW what the heck was going on I would FIX it! Please do not bitch about those of us who want to know something WITHOUT a full correction of what the hell you are talking about! If you are going to correct me FINE! But tell what the me what the hell you ARE CORRECTING! Don’t just act smart and if the rest of the rest of the world is dumb, EXPLAIN!

Kapish!?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View NormG's profile

NormG

3632 posts in 1510 days


#11 posted 430 days ago

I like it, both coming and the white

-- Norman

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2697 posts in 994 days


#12 posted 430 days ago

HM. Hunh? I’m not sure what twisted your panties. But I apologize whatever it was. Chill out big fella, it’s all good.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8473 posts in 2155 days


#13 posted 430 days ago

I’ve used it and it worked quite well. also used it for a cutting board that is seeing daily use for the past year or 2 and its holding up very well to the liquids , soap and water it sees daily.

on specs it is identical to TB-II

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View Kreegan's profile

Kreegan

1452 posts in 653 days


#14 posted 430 days ago

It’s my wood glue of choice. Pretty much identical to Titebond II, but a little cheaper. I like it because it’s effective down to 50* F.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6711 posts in 1421 days


#15 posted 430 days ago

Come on Dallas, what the hell? Do you NOT know how to explain gorilla Glue? I do NOT understand the difference. EXPLAIN,... and get off your high horse. Geez, this is a woodworking question already… get it?

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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