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wood storage /distance between supports compared to stickering

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Forum topic by Vjeko posted 529 days ago 1259 views 1 time favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Vjeko

128 posts in 2019 days


529 days ago

Topic tags/keywords: question

From what I’ve read on the web, stickering is usually done with a spacing of 12”-16”
for 1” or thinner boards and 16” – 18” for anything thicker like framing lumber, with
20”-24” being maximum (commercial stickering is around 20”-24” ).

I’m planning a wood rack and I was wondering how is it that I see
a lot of examples of boards being supported in excess of 36” – don’t
the rules for drying wood also apply for keeping dried wood flat
i.e. need to use “stickering distances” between supports ?

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia


15 replies so far

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1471 posts in 877 days


#1 posted 528 days ago

Vjeko,

Your thoughts are valid for lumber with a higher moisture content and lumber stored in uncontrolled moisture environments, although air dried or kiln dried when minimum moisture content is achieved and lumber is stored inside in low moisture conditions it is less likely to warp and twist with a little more distance between supports but I personally still store on my racks with 16” on center supports and ‘sticker’ spacing.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

796 posts in 715 days


#2 posted 528 days ago

My racks are on 24” centers so that they align with the studs.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1223 posts in 677 days


#3 posted 528 days ago

I keep all my wood sticked at 16” when stored long term. My part of Tejas gets some wild humidity and temp changes, not to mention mold and mildew growth. this works well. there are a lot of places where I just use brackets to cantilever off of studs, that are also 16” on center(just like Jesse T, but my walls must be newer) . Automatic spacing, then just stack lumber and use ply scrap to stick as I go up. That is three and out… Problem solved!!! :)

-- Who is John Galt?

View Harry Montana's profile

Harry Montana

46 posts in 600 days


#4 posted 527 days ago

storage is not just about stickering, there are a few more issues to obbey on acclimating and storage of wood boards . Your stickers need to be vertically alligned, no sun, some wind, on this page we have listed the checklist on storage of your wood.

-- With regards from Harry Montana http://www.hardydeck.com

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2094 posts in 793 days


#5 posted 527 days ago

Lee Valley’s catalog says 2 ft spacing is fine, with the first and last support near the ends of the board. More frequent can’t hurt, but I’ve followed their recommendation and had no problems.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View Vjeko's profile

Vjeko

128 posts in 2019 days


#6 posted 526 days ago

OK, thanks for all the comments – that certainly confirmed what I was thinking – now to try and find an
optimal solution for my cramped space ;)

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1223 posts in 677 days


#7 posted 526 days ago

Here is a pic from my old shop. Look past the guy on the saw, and you’ll see the brackets I used. They actuall extend over the side outfeed of the saw and take advantage of that space. It was also easy to just pull rips down and go right to the saw. They only extended about 16 to 18” off the saw which is about the same width as my unisaw fence, so it never interfered. On the back wall in the same shadow was my chop saw bank. the shelves extended above that as well. I could rip, stack, walk around and pull rips down from the other end right onto the chop saw. There were actually 5 sets of these brackets made up on that wall above the saw, and three under the table along the same wall. The material in the pic is ply so is not sticked the second pic gives a perspective of how small the space was. If you could see to the left of the camera it is right in line with the line of my chop saw, and you can see storage below the table. very efficient. Sorry bout the mess, this was shortly before i moved. You can see in my profile I liked this system so much I duplicated it with pallet rack in my new shop… on a grander scale.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1447 posts in 1119 days


#8 posted 526 days ago

I think Len has it right – if you are working with lumber with a higher moisture content, stickering, following the rules noted by Harry are in play.
Personally, I almost always buy kiln dried, and I have for the last three years stacked it on side edges on flat shelves – all my lumber, maybe 500+ board feet, over 20 species. Haven’t lost a board foot yet.

As far as the stuff I find that is not kiln dried, or even if I buy some from somebody that is air dried, I cut it up on my bandsaw and put it up to dry. It all gets stickered at 3/4” spacing in the part of my basement that gets some heat from the house, with hardwood, kiln dried stickers no more then 24” apart on the run, until the wood reaches somewhere in the low teens in moisture, then I will check the whole board with a moisture meter, (I own the Ryobi surface contact model), and if it all is well under 20%, like 12-14%, I’ll put it up on the edge shelves. Once in a while some of it splits a little or just develops a double warp of some sort, but not much. Just put some flame maple I found locally and sawed a few months back up on the vertical shelves yesterday.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View Vjeko's profile

Vjeko

128 posts in 2019 days


#9 posted 526 days ago

Paul , do you have any pics of the stacking on side edges and vertical shelves you mentioned ?

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

View needshave's profile

needshave

150 posts in 564 days


#10 posted 526 days ago

Yes, +1 to Vjeko’s comment. I would appreciate seeing it stacked on side edges. How do you handle all of the random width’s? smallest to the front I would imagine. Very interesting idea. I have always store in on the flat side, on flat shelves with sticks in between. AS always, the one i need is on the bottom.

View Tennessee's profile

Tennessee

1447 posts in 1119 days


#11 posted 526 days ago

I do not have any pics of the wood on its side on the rack. Each rack is essentially eight feet long, and about 24” wide. Choose that width so I could maximize cutting up the 3/4” pressure treated ply I used for the shelves. the shelf rails are simply 2X4 bolted to vertical 2X4 which are attached to the rafters in the room I use. I made two units, three shelves each. The ply shelves are held to the 2X4s by 1 5/8” drywall screws, driven down a little below the surface of the ply. Worked great.

I separate the wood mostly by color then family, if you can believe it. Length, it has to be at least four feet long to make the rack. I keep two 48” square pallets for the shorter stuff, which is flat stacked. The first and lowest shelf is about 6” off the ground, and the highest is about 24” from the ceiling. Split the middle one.
When you stack, if you have one plank a little longer than eight feet it makes a great side border since it spans the two verticals, and provides a neat wall to stack all the others against.

I know sometimes this may not seem optimal, and you can separate any way you think is good, but after rearranging the wood three times, it occurred to me that I build most of my furniture by color, and having all the maple together is better than having it all on the shelves by size. I also have two of the shelves dedicated to the big stock, like 4X4s of old oak I got in an old barn, and the rest of that shelf is stacked with old oak. You can also stack on top of each other, so if you have a lot of 4-6” wide oak planks for instance, you can put a second layer on edge right on top of the first, which is already on edge, as long as there is wood next to it to hold it up. I usually fill one shelf so it doesn’t tip a lot.

Right now I have a lot of this Pacific Coast maple that I got for $1.00 a foot at a sale at a local lumberyard in trouble, so I have that double stacked up.

One last thing, I try to mark with a black magic marker the type of wood on the edge sticking out, so I know what I am picking, so I don’t pull a piece of pecan, when I actually wanted a piece of brown oak, and so on. It was a lot of work for the first writing of edges, but after that it is simple to do when you add new wood.

-- Paul, Tennessee, http://www.tsunamiguitars.com

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1223 posts in 677 days


#12 posted 526 days ago

+1 On the labeling Tenessee. It took a while for that habit to really ingrain itself i me, but it is such a time saver. Even though I stack flat, I still label the font edge for what it is.

-- Who is John Galt?

View Vjeko's profile

Vjeko

128 posts in 2019 days


#13 posted 525 days ago

Tennessee, I guess this is what you have described (just one plywood shelf shown)

I was curious about “on the side” storage because I buy all my lumber rough sawn i.e. log is “sliced” and dried and that’s how I buy it and store it (without any removal of bark/outer
edges). I guess you remove the outer rough edges and then store on edge ?
Was curious how you keep the boards from falling over (the boards I buy
are anywhere to 35 cm wide and thickness is 3cm, 5cm or 8cm).

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

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Vjeko

128 posts in 2019 days


#14 posted 524 days ago

Any feedback ?

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

View Vjeko's profile

Vjeko

128 posts in 2019 days


#15 posted 522 days ago

OK, did I say something wrong or did you all disappear on holidays ;) ?

-- Vjeko Balas - Croatia

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