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Why do you guys cover your shop walls with board(etc) please?

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Forum topic by orchard posted 558 days ago 1597 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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orchard

8 posts in 558 days


558 days ago

Evening/Morning :) As in the title really chaps, I’m as green as the hills in late spring and bought some board to stick on (what we call) breeze block garage wall before installing and attaching my kit to it. I sought advice as to the best way to achieve this in the uk, and I was told it was pointless, and that I may as well install directly.
You guys all seem to take it as a given, and debate whether to paint these false walls and what colour etc.
What’s the virtue(s) of doing this please?
Also, is there any way of minimising this forum for mobiles please, my BB keeps on bugging out :)
Thanks loads in advance
Cheers
Nick


22 replies so far

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Monte Pittman

13827 posts in 972 days


#1 posted 558 days ago

I see no point in painting shop walls. Just me.

My previous phone minimized the forum for me. New one doesn’t.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

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orchard

8 posts in 558 days


#2 posted 558 days ago

Thanks Monte :)
I’m probably going to have to paint whatever surface I settle on, if only because there’s no natural light.

What I was wondering was what the reason was behind you guys tending to put a wooden or plasterboard surface over a brick/breeze block wall in your shops, and whether I should do likewise over a good wall :)

[Cheers for the mobile tip, shame, because my BB bugs out, and even when it doesn’t re-formatting sucks lol]

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helluvawreck

15623 posts in 1500 days


#3 posted 558 days ago

I prefer plywood or OSB on the walls because you can hang things on it where you want without any hassle. I can do without the paint. However, white paint does reflect light very well , tends to brighten the atmosphere, and you can more easily see tools on the wall.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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knotscott

5428 posts in 2009 days


#4 posted 558 days ago

Putting drywall or paneling over it allows you to add some insulation, plus some folks prefer the finished look.

White paint will brighten up the space.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View REL's profile

REL

45 posts in 2291 days


#5 posted 558 days ago

I kinda like clean new cement blocks unpainted. Ours are usually a medium gray. Painting white brightens things up for artificial lighting, but is it really necessary? I would prefer more lighting; even more than necessary to brighten the shop up. This will result in less work and upkeep.

To answer your question, The answer is no! Wall board or wood siding is not necessary and adds nothing to the workings of a woodworking shop.

If you must paint, god bless you, pick the color and type of paint you want.

-- REL, North Jersey

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helluvawreck

15623 posts in 1500 days


#6 posted 558 days ago

Insulation saves on the heating bill if you heat your shop. However, a shop is a very personal place and you should do whatever makes you happy and enjoy your time in the shop to the fullest.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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GrandpaLen

1494 posts in 906 days


#7 posted 558 days ago

Nick,

Welcome to LumberJocks , a world of advise, opinions, and experiences, all shared without judgement.

To your point, Finished vs. Unfinished concrete block walls in the shop.
You can indeed leave the surface bare if insulating isn’t necessary and you can use French Cleats to attach cabinets, tool racks and pegboard storage to the walls with no problem or just use stand alone fixtures/cabinets.

Work Safely and have Fun. – Grandpa Len.

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile (online now)

Smitty_Cabinetshop

9818 posts in 1252 days


#8 posted 557 days ago

Personally, I’m in the ‘paint concrete walls’ camp because gray concrete, to me, is beyond industrial and is depressing. Absorbs light, looks dank, is cold, etc. etc. And it absorbs moisture. So I’d seal it and paint it before installing a french cleat system. Why that? A few well-place anchors are better than holes all over the place in cement block. My .02

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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orchard

8 posts in 558 days


#9 posted 557 days ago

Some fantastic responses thanks!
Unfortunately it’s muddied the waters, haha :)
I’ve bought the OSB for one of the two walls, so cost isn’t an issue, but with it being a single garage maybe I’d regret eating into the width…oh decisions…insulation isn’t an issue though, but I will need to attach my RAS/feed/extraction and probably storage etc…
What are French Cleats please? Are they what we call Rawl/Wall Plugs?
:)

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Smitty_Cabinetshop

9818 posts in 1252 days


#10 posted 557 days ago

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

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orchard

8 posts in 558 days


#11 posted 557 days ago

French Cleats are a good idea in the shop—well versatile and give a nice ordered feel :)

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orchard

8 posts in 558 days


#12 posted 557 days ago

Crikey Scotsman, you could build a longboat in that badger :o

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

656 posts in 807 days


#13 posted 557 days ago

That type of block leaks air badly. If you are going to heat your shop space you will need to seal the block with some kind of paint.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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bondogaposis

2493 posts in 985 days


#14 posted 557 days ago

I think the main reason to insulate and heat. The stud walls also give you a place to run the electrical wiring. In my shop I used sheet rock on the inside and painted it white for brightness as I have only one small window.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6926 posts in 1548 days


#15 posted 557 days ago

Referencing @knotscott’s image in post #4, I would go that route, BUT instead of drywall you might consider 3/4in plywood as a final surface. Yes this adds quite a bit to the cost factor, however, with a 3/4in ply wall you will be able to attach/hang anything anywhere you choose to do so. And going this route does allow you to hide all wiring for those multiple power outlets that you will need to install anyway. And painting the ply white is not a bad idea either.

My 2-cents…

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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