LumberJocks

siding

  • Advertise with us

« back to Wood & Lumber forum

Forum topic by birdman007 posted 527 days ago 617 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View birdman007's profile

birdman007

2 posts in 528 days


527 days ago

I am about to build a work shop. My question is after framing out the walls and before they are raised, would
iit be better to lay one of the t1-11 sheets on the corner of each wall, get it square then tack the four corners to hold it place while you raise the wall. It just seems it would be easier to get these first pieces
squared and plumb while it is horizontal.


15 replies so far

View Clint Searl's profile

Clint Searl

1390 posts in 964 days


#1 posted 527 days ago

Good idea; wish I’d done that.

-- Clint Searl.............We deserve what we tolerate

View cutmantom's profile

cutmantom

271 posts in 1638 days


#2 posted 527 days ago

you can sheet the whole thing if you have the means to lift it

View teejk's profile

teejk

1207 posts in 1287 days


#3 posted 527 days ago

If you ever see a “panelized” house get put together you’ll see they come off the truck with all sheathing and windows installed. Of course they use a crane.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1216 posts in 675 days


#4 posted 527 days ago

I am with the others, weight is the only thing keeping you from sheathing, insulating, heck put in the windows. If that is going to be too heavy, many just tack a diagonal 1x across the face. Can’t tell your location from your profile, but a diagonal brace may be required or recommended in your area, even on a sheathed wall, depending on the wall and different shear factors. (wind, snow) putting this brace in would suffice to raise the wall, and then panel. But I am still +10 on doing what you can while the wall is flat. Just remember to think through how the panels will overlap on the corners and raise them in the right order. ;)

-- Who is John Galt?

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

13345 posts in 941 days


#5 posted 527 days ago

If you have some help, go for it.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 880 days


#6 posted 527 days ago

Simply tacking in the four corners may not hold square when you raise the wall. As others have stated, you are better off nailing it off while its on the ground. Start by aligning the sheet on the bottom plate and nail it off. You can square the wall by tweaking the top corner until its flush with the T1-11. Once aligned nail that corner. Verify square on the other end and measure diagonally corner to corner in one direction, then the other. Once square nail it off completely. While its on the ground, cut out any window or door openings that the T1-11 covered over. Done this method for years in my youth and it works.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View teejk's profile

teejk

1207 posts in 1287 days


#7 posted 527 days ago

Joey…I forgot to mention what you said…it will require a little advance planning! The flats are easy enough to deal with but you do lose the “visual” that you get when doing it the old fashion way.

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1288 posts in 1412 days


#8 posted 527 days ago

That’s only good if you know your foundation to be true and level. Why not frame the wall and let in a one by four brace as mentioned, stand the wall , plumb it then install the siding ? Siding on a vertical wall is easier on the back too.

View joeyinsouthaustin's profile

joeyinsouthaustin

1216 posts in 675 days


#9 posted 527 days ago

There are ways to find out if, and compensate for, level long before the first cut is made. My back doesn’t agree with your back, but not all backs are the same. Any how… just points out that it is important to start from a good foundation.

-- Who is John Galt?

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 980 days


#10 posted 527 days ago

As already mentioned be sure to check that your foundation wall or slab is level or very close to level before moving ahead with installing the t-111. You want your walls plumb. Usually it is close enough unless you had a really bad mason and i’ve seen them. Brick walls 6” out of plumb in 10ft. Didn’t have to put a level on it to see it was so far out.

T-111 siding or sheathing is easier to put on while the wall is flat. Be sure to overhang the sheathing/siding on one side of the corner to catch the other wall.
Other siding (vinyl, aluminum, clapboard) is better put on after the wall is standing.

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 880 days


#11 posted 527 days ago

cabmaker- there’s more than one way to skin a cat. Let’s refer back to the question asked in the forum from birdman007. Birdman007 wants to frame his walls and stand them up into place with T1-11 applied (tacked) to the wall. In this application it would be best to nail off the T1-11 than to just tack it off. This would assure the wall remains square as it is stood up into place. Tacking it off the T1-11 might not prevent wall from racking, and defeating the purpose of sheeting it first. Your method of standing the wall up, bracing it square, then sheeting, is also acceptable and is a standard practice for many framing contractors. But wasn’t the question asked. As joeyinsouthaustin and OnlyJustMe points out any deviation of the foundation has to be addressed before hand. Before either method can be implemented

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View cabmaker's profile

cabmaker

1288 posts in 1412 days


#12 posted 527 days ago

Ok ok. It seems some of you guys read a lot into some posts. I well understand the orig. question. It’s nether here nor there whether he tacks a sheet of siding in place before standing a wall for a ground level bldg. A let in brace should be cut in on the bias and nailed fast at the top and only tacked at the bottom to allow for alignment after the wall is raised. The question itself indicates that he has no framing experience and is anticipating using the sheet of siding as a primary brace for the wall.. Therefore foregoing tithe angle bracing. had he mentioned that I would say have at it. As for as the back deal I don’t mean the wall will be too heavy to raise I meant it is easier on the back to nail in an upright position than to stay bent over for. Long periods nailing. Good luck with it ! JB

View OnlyJustME's profile

OnlyJustME

1562 posts in 980 days


#13 posted 527 days ago

Let’s remember that different areas of the country or different countries require different framing practices. What’s necessary on the west coast isn’t needed on the east coast (USA). Some areas lay the sheathing horizontal and some go vertical. We all have different ways of doing the same thing.

I of course was assuming working alone because that is how i would most likely be doing it since most of my family and friends are 3 hrs away. Hard for me to hold a 4’x8’ piece of t-111 on a standing wall and nail it off. When i was on a crew (and that was many years ago and practices may have changed) we used to stand the wall up bare and braced it plumb then nailed the sheathing on. We never let in a 2×4 brace. The braces came down after the sheathing was up. Leaving the braces in the wall would be a good idea especially if in tremor prone areas(probably required there).

-- In the end, when your life flashes before your eyes, will you like what you see?

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 880 days


#14 posted 527 days ago

cabmaker – Wasn’t trying to ruffle anyones feathers. The idea of the brace you are refering to is perhaps code in your area when using a product like T1-11 as sheating/siding. Was never a code requirement when I was framing. I read his question and I was simply pointing out that tacking a nail in each corner of a 4×8 sheet may not be sufficient to keep the wall square as you stand it into place. Four nails wouldn’t be enough. It would probably rack.

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

View kdc68's profile

kdc68

1942 posts in 880 days


#15 posted 526 days ago

Scotsman – correct. Cutting out window/door openings would also help lighten the load

-- Measure "at least" twice and cut once

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase