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Forum topic by Tony posted 2648 days ago 1190 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Tony

978 posts in 2661 days


2648 days ago

Hi to all you wood turners.

I want to turn a wine Goblet – the outside profile is not a problem, that is all done.

But when it comes to gouging out the inside of the goblet, where the importan stuff has to go, I just cannot cut the wood with the gouges I have.

What type of gouge should I be using for this – is there something special, or am just being unlucky

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)


15 replies so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12262 posts in 2729 days


#1 posted 2648 days ago

Are you using a bowel gouge? A spindle gouge would work good for the outside.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2661 days


#2 posted 2648 days ago

I did not know there was a difference. I have only ever turned spindles and such like. Thanks = I am going to a store tomorrow morning, I look up what they have for bowl gouges.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12262 posts in 2729 days


#3 posted 2648 days ago

You may want to get a video as well. There is a technique to it. Also, you will probably need a scraper.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2668 days


#4 posted 2648 days ago

End grain hollowing is tough even with the right tool for the job. If the wood is wet, you can get away with a spindle gounge on end grain, but its certainly not my first choice. I prefer to start the hollowing with a bowl gouge, and then move to a round nosed scraper. I have alot of hollowing tools as well and with goblets, nothing works better than the termite. (my opinion) for jobs like that. However, no matter what, end grain hollowing is about the most difficult cutting to do anyway. Good luck. If you have a digital camera, take some pictures of the tools you are using, and the wood. Wayne can get you on the right track and I’ll keep track of this thread along with other turners..we should be able to get you rolling in the right direction.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View jockmike2's profile

jockmike2

10635 posts in 2878 days


#5 posted 2648 days ago

I recently made a wine glass out of cherry, I also recommend the termite, if your project is round, if not use a round nose scraper. Do you have a bowl steady? I showed one I made in my projects, if you go there you’ll see both the wine glass and home made bowl steady that works great. jockmike

-- (You just have to please the man in the Mirror) Mike from Michigan -

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2668 days


#6 posted 2648 days ago

Thanks for mention of the bowl steady, jock…I’m headed over to read about it. Tony, you can get a termite at Oneway, or at Woodcraft. Oneway makes it. The great thing about it is that they have a great way of using a router to sharpen it and give you the jig and everything. It’s worth a peak as it’s not a fast cutter like the Woodcut Proforme, but it’s a very accurate and smooth cutter. I use the woodcut on bigger projects as it really augers out the wood. The termite is really nice on smaller things.

Cheers!

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2661 days


#7 posted 2647 days ago

Thanks for all the comments guys

I purchased a couple of scrapers at my local store, but theyt did not have any bowl gouges. They have been ordered and should arrive at the weekend.

As for the termite, it looks a great tool, I may order one the next time I get some equipment from the US.

I came up with a comprimise for the goblet, I used my drill chuck in the Lathe tail stock – fitted a Forstner bit and removed most of the waste from the goblet. Then using a spindle gouge and scraper refined the inside.

The result was far from perfect, but it help in the assesment as to feasability of making goblets – not as easy as I first thought.

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View Bill's profile

Bill

2579 posts in 2793 days


#8 posted 2647 days ago

Good idea Tony. I bet a lot of turners do some pre-boring and such before actually doing the turning. I know they make the systems that allow you to make multiple bowls from a single piece of wood. Basically, it cores out the center, but of course leaves it intact so you can use it for your next bowl. They look like great tools, but I have not needed one yet.

I looked at the termite too, and am considering purchasing it. Woodcraft has a nice kit that includes almost all the heads, the handle, a sharpener, and holder for a nice price. A good way to start.

-- Bill, Turlock California, http://www.brookswoodworks.com

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2653 days


#9 posted 2646 days ago

Tony: I use this set up to bore out the centers of most cylinders then switch to a bowl gouge or similar device to finish it out.

Cheers
Bob
Forstner in spindle

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12262 posts in 2729 days


#10 posted 2646 days ago

I found a MT 2 Drill chuck for a lathe at Sears on close out a while back. I think it was about $10. Always pays to check the clearance isle at Sears.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2668 days


#11 posted 2646 days ago

That’s a good idea, Bob…that should go pretty fast with uniform pressure on the piece and chuck…it should make for less chance of orbiting the piece in the early hollowing stages where I tend to get a little greedy with my cuts.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View oscorner's profile

oscorner

4564 posts in 2942 days


#12 posted 2626 days ago

Tony, I’ve done it with a narrow parting tool, but it is a scary process. You must keep the angle just right to avoid a catch. I use it and a round nose scrapper to dig out most of it, then come behind it with a Fostner Bit to clean up the center.

-- Jesus is Lord!

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2931 days


#13 posted 2625 days ago

When I made the cannister set, I made a bowl scraper out of an old flat file. I wanted fairly square bottom, so I ground it like this. You can grind to any shape you wish. I’ve used this on quite a few bowls, & vases.

Heres a couple of images.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View Tony's profile

Tony

978 posts in 2661 days


#14 posted 2624 days ago

Dick – thanks for the suggestion – I had already tried something like that for use on a drill press, before I got a lathe – I must keep my eyes open for some more old files, I can make a complete set of custom scrapers for next to nothing.

ALL – I got my termite, Oneway chuck and other goodies – all I need now is to learn to use it all. The first attempts with the Termite were disastrous!! Cutting the end grain of Beech is not so easy – so I tried “green” Silver Birch, a little easier – but not what I was expecting.
So back to the “Drawing Board” or rather the internet and start to read-up on the basics of wood turning again – Isn’t life full of little joyful moments!

-- Tony - All things are possible, just some things are more difficult than others! - SKYPE: Heron2005 (http://www.poydatjatuolit.fi)

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2668 days


#15 posted 2624 days ago

Tony, what problems are you having with the Termite? Can I help?

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

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