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Forum topic by Boatman53 posted 02-16-2013 03:13 PM 2850 views 0 times favorited 35 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Boatman53

848 posts in 948 days


02-16-2013 03:13 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tool box tool storage

I found this little (10” x 14” x 31/2”) box on a non woodworking forum and I’m trying to find some answers and generally start a discussion on compact tool storage. The question I have is, does anyone have any idea what those curved lines on that brass triangle would be used for or what they might represent? This box has inspired me to build my own, it’s much manageable than the H.O. Studley chest.I’ll be writing about my build in a blog that I’ll start in a day or so. In the meantime any thoughts on this chest or compact storage in general?
There are more photos here. http://mantiquesmodern.com/item_details.php?id=499555
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise


35 replies so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

13633 posts in 2086 days


#1 posted 02-16-2013 03:43 PM

I see some arc lines on it with nos. at the top and what appears to be holes at the bottom. My best guess is that it is used with a pencil or an awl to mark different diameter circles or maybe arcs? I’m sure someone will find about this.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15337 posts in 1940 days


#2 posted 02-16-2013 03:50 PM

How cool is that, what a great piece of history! Look fwd to hearing the answer as I was thinking the same as Stefang.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Brit's profile

Brit

5310 posts in 1594 days


#3 posted 02-16-2013 03:52 PM

Hi Jim – Here’s my 2 cents. I love the idea of compact storage for the purposes of transporting tools. I love looking at all the tools tightly packed into such a small space. What I don’t like is the thought of having to move one or two tools in order to get to the one I want to use. I would treat this kind of tool case as a means of carrying my tools around which I would unpack at the job site and leave unpacked whilst working during the day. Then I’d pack them up again in the case when it is time to head on home. One big advatage of this kind of case is that it is easy to see if you are missing anything when you’re packing up.

It is a cool project in any case. (pardon the pun)

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

5191 posts in 1044 days


#4 posted 02-16-2013 04:59 PM

If the brass triangle you’re talking about is what’s almost centered in the main tool box part,

I’m pretty sure it’s purpose is to decoratively hold the square blade in place.

I remember seeing Roy Underhill use a Passer Drill to do something similar on a Woodwrights Shop episode.

This is a video from his school. You can see the actual drilling and results starting at about 5 minutes.

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View JesseTutt's profile

JesseTutt

811 posts in 862 days


#5 posted 02-16-2013 05:11 PM

if you are talking about the brass triangle in the lower right portion of the picture then I am in agreement with Mike (stefang) that they are probably for drawing circles, or arcs, of different radii.

I like the way that a craftsman of yester yore could design and build such a compact case to hold all of his tools. Although I would agree with Brit that I would leave them out while working.

-- Jesse, Saint Louis, Missouri

View Benvolio's profile

Benvolio

135 posts in 683 days


#6 posted 02-16-2013 05:16 PM

yup.

looks like you’d offer it up to a workpiece to mark compare radiuses (radii??) for making repeat cuts on legs etc. Guess it was easier than carrying around scrap wood for jigs in the days before cheap sheet material and pick up trucks.

But my guess is as good as anyone elses

Benv

-- Ben, England.

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2145 days


#7 posted 02-16-2013 05:48 PM

Yes I know, its like all of us want to run to the shop and start making this box, it looks beautiful…..but…...

I have been a couple of times in my life in the situation that I needed to get rid of almost all I had…and the question always is: What are those tools that I’ll be always in need of…??? From all of my tools what ae those that I’ll never part from? In my personal experience, I think, those are the tools I will place in that box. Now, the organization and tool list for my box is totally different of a Luthiermakers’s Box. Just my two cents.

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1106 days


#8 posted 02-16-2013 05:56 PM

If you are talking about the square, it’s decorative, the triangle on the door on the right however is probably similiar to a framing square today, or similiar to tools you may or may not have used in your geometry class.

my guess though its that it’s for drawing angles on boards or what have you, in the way that you would with a modern speed square.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View Brit's profile

Brit

5310 posts in 1594 days


#9 posted 02-16-2013 06:28 PM

I think the brass traingle is what is known as a woodworker’s triangle. As well as using it for marking 90 and 45 degree angles, you can use those graduations to mark off other angles too. I think the scribed arcs are just a means to get the graduations along the hypotenuse. Here is a more modern version from Rockler.

Jim, if I might be so bold, I’d like to ask another question of the group: What did the owner of this toolbox do for a living? What trade are these the tools of?

-- Andy -- Old Chinese proverb say: If you think something can't be done, don't interrupt man who is doing it.

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

5191 posts in 1044 days


#10 posted 02-16-2013 06:55 PM

I didn’t even notice the other one in the door. Hard to tell it was brass, and it was cut off until I viewed the image outside of the forum. I guess my answer isn’t quite what you’re looking for lol

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View Don W's profile

Don W

15563 posts in 1319 days


#11 posted 02-16-2013 07:00 PM

That is a cool chest. I’ll be watching the blog build. Its going to be interesting.

Andy, my guess to your question would be a finish carpenter.

In carpentry that square resembles a speed square.

-- Master hand plane hoarder. - http://timetestedtools.com

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

848 posts in 948 days


#12 posted 02-16-2013 07:13 PM

Andy of course you can as and add whatever you want. I was thinking a boatbuilder mostly because of the handle on top of the box. I have several very similar in my shop. They are used for lifting hatches, yet fold flat so they can be walked on. I am indeed familiar with a speed square, and as Andy showed the angled lines are all straight. In this photo they curve down to maybe the corner or to the graduated scale along the bottom edge. It looks like there is a name/logo on the square but I can’t make it out. I like the idea of a radius reference, but the way they arch they aren’t a true radius. For laying out angles they go to the wrong point. This is a better shot.

My kit will have my most oft used tools, with some compromises. Specific jobs might need other tools. I normally have a pretty full compliment of tools in my car at least all summer long. I’d say adopt 90% of my work from May to October is out of the shop, either in a boatyard or dock or the most challenging on a boat on a mooring. The maximum inconvenience I’m striving for is moving one thing to get the tool I need, and yes it would stay out till I’m ready to leave.
Jim

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6902 posts in 1903 days


#13 posted 02-16-2013 09:27 PM

That box is definitely inspiring. I love it! Saving that picture. Cant wait to watch your blog! This is going to be good.

Maybe those arched lines are just a fancier way of going about the same thing as the speed square? I mean the thing is brass so it is definitely a show off piece, maybe they just wanted to be fancy.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

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Mauricio

6902 posts in 1903 days


#14 posted 02-16-2013 09:28 PM

Whats up with the spoke shave at the bottome with no handles?

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Boatman53's profile

Boatman53

848 posts in 948 days


#15 posted 02-16-2013 10:09 PM

I agree Mauricio, that spokeshave is throwing me a bit too. Clearly there is room in the box for a bit more handle. Could it be it was cut down to fit a particular job?, because of some restriction of space? A mystery. The other mystery is what the heck is the tool in the back right corner? It looks like a bulbous type handle with a steel pointy thing right on top?

-- Jim, Long Island, NY Ancorayachtservice.com home of the chain leg vise

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