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Forum topic by docspencer posted 02-16-2013 12:21 PM 644 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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docspencer

292 posts in 1408 days


02-16-2013 12:21 PM

I’ve got a 1” thick piece of white oak I though I’d use to make a clock. I’ve got 2 questions:

1) How do I go about figuring how deep to rout the cavity for the movement?

2) What’s the best to actually rout out that cavity? I”m thinking a thick jig and top bearing bit. Any better ideas?

I’d appreciate any ideas!!!


6 replies so far

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helluvawreck

23157 posts in 2329 days


#1 posted 02-16-2013 12:40 PM

You need to get the movement first and by looking at the movement you can figure out the depth. The movement may have directions with it to show you what the cavity will be. You can probably probably get out most of the waste with one or more forstner bits. Maybe a combination of forstner bits and router bits. It’s all going to depend on what sort of cavity the movement requires so getting the movement seems to be step one.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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docspencer

292 posts in 1408 days


#2 posted 02-16-2013 01:04 PM

Thanks, helluva. That makes perfect sense.

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JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1469 days


#3 posted 02-16-2013 02:02 PM

If you’ve never done a clock before, make sure you get one with a long enough stem so you dont end up with paper-thin wood where it comes thru the hole. (The stem is what the hands mount on)

Arts and Crafts stores like Michaels and Hobby Lobby usually carry a variety of types with varrying stem lengths.

Once you getthe hang of it and want to do more clocks, check out garage sales, and flea markets for battery operated clocks that are cheap. This past Christmas I made 4 clocks for the guys that worked in the same dept. The clock works at Hobby Lobby were $9.95 each. I happened to find 4 clocks new at WalMart that had a long enough stem that were on closeout for $3 each. That was like buying one and getting 3 free to me.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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docspencer

292 posts in 1408 days


#4 posted 02-16-2013 02:31 PM

Again, that makes sense, thanks. One movement I”m looking at is 2-3/16’’ Wide x 2-3/16’’ High x 9/16’’ D, so I think I have plenty of room for the face thickness – 7/16” minus how much I want the movement to be inside of the back of the clock. Does this make sense?

I like the idea of salvaging movements from old or cheap clocks.

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JoeinGa

7481 posts in 1469 days


#5 posted 02-16-2013 02:49 PM

Without putting a ruler to it, I’d say that sounds pretty close. You want the stem to protrude just enough to get the thin washer on and be able to tighten the nut without a bunch of threads poking out past the nut.

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

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docspencer

292 posts in 1408 days


#6 posted 02-16-2013 02:56 PM

Oh, yeah. I forgot about that washer. I went ahead and ordered that movement. If things don’t work out, I can always take another piece of scrap oak and start again.

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