LumberJocks

Building a cutting board.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by pmd73 posted 562 days ago 567 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View pmd73's profile

pmd73

13 posts in 574 days


562 days ago

I thought a cutting board would be a good project to do.I know i can’t use any old finish on it but to use food grade.But what about the glue.What kind of glue should i use and tips on the finish.


12 replies so far

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4138 posts in 1584 days


#1 posted 562 days ago

I think that most people use TiteBond II on it. That’s what I’ve used on the half-dozen or so boards I’ve made and it has worked out pretty well so far.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View Pdub's profile

Pdub

893 posts in 1812 days


#2 posted 562 days ago

Use Titebond III for the glue and mineral oil for the finish. Some add bees wax to the mineral oil but it’s not required.

Brandon is correct. TB II will work also.

-- Paul, North Dakota, USAF Ret.

View Brandon's profile

Brandon

4138 posts in 1584 days


#3 posted 562 days ago

Actually, I was thinking of Titebond III (the Green bottle, not the blue one). Sorry.

-- "hold fast to that which is good"

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 881 days


#4 posted 562 days ago

Titebond II will work just fine, but the short open time is going to give you grief. I generally use titebond 3, mineral oil, and then mineral oil with beeswax melted in.

Lately I have been favoring the Elmers Advanced. It has all the properties of TBIII, but it doesn’t dry as dark, it sands A LOT easier, and it is much less affected by finishes.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View grfrazee's profile

grfrazee

325 posts in 772 days


#5 posted 562 days ago

If I recall correctly, Titebond III is food-grade and rated for prolonged water contact. Some of the others may not be.

Granted TBIII is a bit more expensive than the others. I would steer away from polyurethane glues (think Gorilla Glue) for cutting boards though. From what I’ve read and heard from other makers, it has a tendency to deteriorate after repeated water exposures and the joints fail.

-- -=Pride is not a sin=-

View PurpLev's profile

PurpLev

8476 posts in 2281 days


#6 posted 562 days ago

you can use TB-II, TB-III, and Gorilla Wood Glue (not the polyurethane expanding glue), all are rated to be food safe.

TB-III is also rated to be water-proof, where as TD-II and Gorilla wood glue are only water-resistance. This is more useful when doing outdoor projects and the likes.

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View pmd73's profile

pmd73

13 posts in 574 days


#7 posted 561 days ago

I know this is going to take a while to do.Another thing,as youre putting the boards together,what do you lay them on to keep flat that it won’t stick to .

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 881 days


#8 posted 561 days ago

Parallel clamps:

These are just some random off cuts that were headed to the burn pile, but it shows you can make a cutting board out of anything. Parallel clamps are the single biggest improvement to making cutting boards I have found so far. They are not cheap – those tow cost me about 80$.

If you do not have parallel clamps, use wax paper.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2869 posts in 1120 days


#9 posted 561 days ago

I use parallel clamps and plastic grocery sacks with the sides cut off.

I quit using waxed paper or freezer paper when I noticed that if I put two grocery bags in a box overnight and checked in the morning there would be at least 50 more bags in there.
Our rabbits we had as kids had nothing on the reproductive abilities of grocery sacks!

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View grfrazee's profile

grfrazee

325 posts in 772 days


#10 posted 561 days ago

@Dallas, when you say you cut the sides of the grocery sacks off, what do you mean, exactly?

-- -=Pride is not a sin=-

View Dallas's profile

Dallas

2869 posts in 1120 days


#11 posted 561 days ago

Fold the sack out flat, so the handles are one either side.

Take the scissors and cut from inside the handles all the way down. When done, unfold. You now have a thin piece of plastic about 12” wide, 24” long and it’s wood glue proof.

-- Improvise.... Adapt...... Overcome!

View pmd73's profile

pmd73

13 posts in 574 days


#12 posted 561 days ago

Good tips,Thanks

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase