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Forum topic by George_SA posted 02-12-2013 07:58 PM 824 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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George_SA

203 posts in 901 days


02-12-2013 07:58 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question inspiration design

How many can relate with this?

-- There are some things that money can't buy - Manners, morals and integrity


21 replies so far

View live4ever's profile

live4ever

983 posts in 1698 days


#1 posted 02-12-2013 08:28 PM

Definitely can relate. I just saw a neat video of the same quote on a blog somewhere…

http://vimeo.com/24715531

-- Optimists are usually disappointed. Pessimists are either right or pleasantly surprised. I tend to be a disappointed pessimist.

View shipwright's profile

shipwright

5084 posts in 1485 days


#2 posted 02-12-2013 08:37 PM

I have to agree but just one question…. how much longer?

:-)

-- Paul M ..............If God wanted us to have fiberglass boats he would have given us fiberglass trees. http://prmdesigns.com/

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2842 posts in 936 days


#3 posted 02-12-2013 09:26 PM

I agree completely. I’ve gotten pretty good at turning and making some small stuff. I’ll get there one day.

Paul, I would start writing books and signing autographs if I turned out a project half as good as any of yours :)

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

830 posts in 1380 days


#4 posted 02-12-2013 10:11 PM

True, so very true. But in this day and age people want everything instantainiously. No matter what, you have to put in time and pay your dues along the way.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View Jim Rowe's profile

Jim Rowe

571 posts in 1000 days


#5 posted 02-12-2013 10:28 PM

As they say, Practice Makes Perfect.
Jim

-- It always looks better when it's finished!

View WoodenFrog's profile

WoodenFrog

2737 posts in 1601 days


#6 posted 02-12-2013 10:33 PM

I thank you for this, I did share it on my facebook site! I really love this!!!

-- Robert B. Sabina, Ohio..... http://www.etsy.com/shop/WoodenfrogWoodenProd

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2081 days


#7 posted 02-12-2013 10:43 PM

Once in a while I spend time doing what is my other passion, oil painting. I found a couple of years ago this paragraph by Chuck Close, a well known american painter, that express pretty much the same Idea but in painting related words:

”The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself. Things occur to you. If you’re sitting around trying to dream up a great art idea, you can sit there a long time before anything happens. But if you just get to work, something will occur to you and something else will occur to you and somthing else that you reject will push you in another direction. Inspiration is absolutely unnecessary and somehow deceptive. You feel like you need this great idea before you can get down to work, and I find that’s almost never the case.”
- Chuck Close

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

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a1Jim

112313 posts in 2265 days


#8 posted 02-12-2013 10:55 PM

I’m still waiting for my skills to catch up with my standards. I don’t rate anything I’ve made over a C-
just barely passable at best. I don’t know if I will ever get there,so I’ll either have to improve my skills or lower my standards :))

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Derakon's profile

Derakon

83 posts in 855 days


#9 posted 02-12-2013 11:01 PM

I have several artist (of the drawing/painting persuasion) friends, and the usual thing they say about art is that you have to get out about 10000 pieces before you really have the kind of expertise needed to produce what you want to produce. Writers produce millions of words before they can consistently make something salable (if they ever get that far!). The same kind of thing applies to woodworking.

I don’t think I’ll ever be truly satisfied with my efforts, but I do hope to eventually be pickier about what it is I don’t like about them!

View Francisco Luna's profile

Francisco Luna

936 posts in 2081 days


#10 posted 02-12-2013 11:06 PM

“when a trade is perfected, becomes art
and when art is perfected, becomes mastery”

-- Nature is my manifestation of God. I go to nature every day for inspiration in the day's work. I follow in building the principles which nature has used in its domain" Frank Lloyd Wright

View TCCcabinetmaker's profile

TCCcabinetmaker

925 posts in 1042 days


#11 posted 02-13-2013 12:41 AM

Actually, you will always be your worst critic if you desire to always get better, so even after you’ve gained some skill, you will always know it could be better. Therefore the satisfaction needs to come from your progress, not your production.

-- The mark of a good carpenter is not how few mistakes he makes, but rather how well he fixes them.

View weldoman's profile (online now)

weldoman

62 posts in 745 days


#12 posted 02-13-2013 12:41 AM

I strive for perfection, and settle for mediocre.

-- missouri, dave

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2907 posts in 1773 days


#13 posted 02-13-2013 12:46 AM

Belonging to a site like this, reading and following the hints, blogs and projects of people like a1Jim and
Shipwright will help you to eliminate a lot of mistakes and decide which skills you want to practice. If
people like them are still learning and trying to improve, then while I may never reach their skill level, I will
just keep enjoying my shop and my tools knowing that I am learning something and staying out of a lot
of trouble and off street corners. Thank you for sharing your journey.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View redryder's profile

redryder

2190 posts in 1789 days


#14 posted 02-13-2013 06:31 AM

I like the saying:

“When your at the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.”

-- mike...............

View Jorge G.'s profile

Jorge G.

1526 posts in 1163 days


#15 posted 02-13-2013 06:39 AM

I have to agree but just one question…. how much longer?

I think you have arrived Paul… :-)

Every endeavor requires discipline. Writers have to sit and write, painter have to pick up the brush and paint, woodworkers have to make something, IMO something that challenges your skills. As the saying goes, practice makes perfect…..

-- To surrender a dream leaves life as it is — and not as it could be.

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